3

I'm using a when statement to check if a variable is in a number of fairly large ranges.

To keep it simple, my code looks something like:

val lowRange = Int.MIN_VALUE..0
val mediumRange = 1..999_999
//...

val valToCheck = 1_000_000

when (valToCheck) {
    in lowRange -> { doSomething() }
    in mediumRange -> { doSomethingElse() }
    //...
    else -> { handleTooHighOrNull() }
}

This works fine; however, when I make valToCheck nullable:

val lowRange = Int.MIN_VALUE..0
val mediumRange = 1..999_999
//...

val valToCheck = if(someCondition) { 1_000_000 } else { null }

when (valToCheck) {
    in lowRange -> { doSomething() }
    in mediumRange -> { doSomethingElse() }
    //...
    else -> { handleTooHighOrNull() }
}

my app freezes completely.

Reducing the size of the range does fix the problem, as does making valToCheck non-nullable or checking for nulls as the first case, but I must be missing something here:

  • Why is this happening? Does the in operator really just iterate through every number in a range and compare it to the given value?

  • If it's actually iterating through every value in the range, why is it only so slow for nullable Ints? (and for that matter why is this not documented anywhere, as this seems like it should be a fairly common use case?)

  • Is there a more readable way to do this?

I'd love it if there were something like:

when(valToCheck) {
    < 0 -> { doSomething() }
    < 500 -> { doSomethingElse() }
    //...
    else -> { handleTooHighOrNull() }
}

but that doesn't seem to be possible, and in fact searching for that was what landed me on using the ranges in the first place.

I'd be very grateful for any suggestions. Thanks!

3
  • Consider reporting this as a bug if you haven't yet. Jul 20 '18 at 6:48
  • @AlexeyRomanov good idea, but I have a maybe dumb question -- what's the best/accepted way of doing that? Should I just go ahead and file a bug on the issue tracker? Or is it something I should bring up on the forums or something first?
    – ajpolt
    Jul 20 '18 at 21:35
  • For this case I think just filing the bug is entirely reasonable. Jul 21 '18 at 5:30
6

If we see the implementation of IntRange, in operator for nullable Int is not defined - thus it falls back to Iterable<T>.contains().


For Ints - O(1):

public class IntRange(start: Int, endInclusive: Int) : IntProgression(start, endInclusive, 1), ClosedRange<Int> {
    ...
    override fun contains(value: Int): Boolean = first <= value && value <= last
    ...
}

For Int?s - O(n):

public operator fun <@kotlin.internal.OnlyInputTypes T> Iterable<T>.contains(element: T): Boolean {
    if (this is Collection)
        return contains(element)
    return indexOf(element) >= 0
}

You can fix this by making an extension function like:

operator fun IntRange.contains(value: Int?): Boolean {
    return if (value != null) {
        first <= value && value <= last
    } else false
} 

This would determine if given nullable Int is in some IntRange in O(1) time.

1
  • Perfect--I assumed it was something like that! Using an extension function also seems like a good call here. Thanks!
    – ajpolt
    Jul 20 '18 at 2:28

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