There are some scripts that do not work correctly if they check for changes.

I tried it like this:

VN=$(git describe --abbrev=7 HEAD 2>/dev/null)

git update-index -q --refresh
CHANGED=$(git diff-index --name-only HEAD --)
if [ ! -z $CHANGED ];
    then VN="$VN-mod"
fi

Is there some kind of boolean check if there has been changes since the last commit, or how can I really test if there are new changes to my local repository?

I'm doing all this for a version creation script (that I found somewhere here).

  • 3
    What's wrong with git status ? – karlphillip Feb 28 '11 at 15:25
  • 2
    @karlphillip: It does a lot of processing that you don't really need. – Cascabel Feb 28 '11 at 15:28
up vote 145 down vote accepted

What you're doing will almost work: you should quote $CHANGED in case it's empty, and -z tests for empty, which means no changes. What you meant was:

if [ -n "$CHANGED" ]; then
    VN="$VN-mod"
fi

A quote from Git's GIT-VERSION-GEN:

git update-index -q --refresh
test -z "$(git diff-index --name-only HEAD --)" ||
VN="$VN-dirty"

It looks like you were copying that, but you just forgot that detail of quoting.

Of course, you could also just do this:

if git diff-index --quiet HEAD --; then
    # No changes
else
    # Changes
fi

Or if you only care about the "something has changed" case:

if ! git diff-index --quiet HEAD --; then
    VN="$VN-mod"
fi

Using --quiet has the benefit that Git can stop processing as soon as it encounters a single diff, so it may not have to check your entire work tree.

  • 2
    Hi, that was one of the best answers on a question, you just gave me all information that I needed and that others my need as well :). I'll just need the last one, "something has changed" :) and you were right, I copied it. – kmindi Feb 28 '11 at 15:34
  • 8
    The amazing bash completion script seems to use git diff --no-ext-diff --quiet --exit-code to determine the dirty state. – mjs Jan 13 '12 at 12:20
  • 2
    @mjs: That's indeed a great place to look for things like this! The --no-ext-diff option is good for safety (in case someone has configured an external diff driver), though the --exit-code shouldn't be necessary, since it's implied by --quiet. – Cascabel Jan 13 '12 at 14:56
  • 3
    This doesn't work for me as it doesn't report untracked files – Cookie Mar 4 '16 at 11:59
  • @Jefromi The last two examples dont work correctly unless you run a "git update-index -q --refresh" before them. Specially if you did a git fetch, pull or checkout before them. – Basil Musa Mar 30 '16 at 21:29

Using git status:

cd /git/directory
if [[ `git status --porcelain` ]]; then
  # Changes
else
  # No changes
fi
  • 9
    The best answer, a shame the answers from the 'shell and git architects' are more highly voted. – jwg Sep 26 '14 at 8:28
  • 2
    This is great as it takes into account unversioned files and also using porcelain, it should be more compatible with different git versions. – Jayd May 7 '15 at 12:25
  • 1
    Best answer so far. – Basil Musa Mar 30 '16 at 15:15
  • 11
    To ignore untracked files: if [[ git status --porcelain --untracked-files=no ]]; then – storm_m2138 Aug 2 '17 at 19:02
  • 2
    For checking local changes -> if [[ $(git status --porcelain | wc -l) -gt 0 ]]; then echo CHANGED else echo NOT CHANGED locally fi – Carlos Saltos Mar 19 at 15:40

Although Jefromi's answer is good, I'm posting this just for reference.

From the Git source code there is a sh script which includes the following.

require_clean_work_tree () {
    git rev-parse --verify HEAD >/dev/null || exit 1
    git update-index -q --ignore-submodules --refresh
    err=0

    if ! git diff-files --quiet --ignore-submodules
    then
        echo >&2 "Cannot $1: You have unstaged changes."
        err=1
    fi

    if ! git diff-index --cached --quiet --ignore-submodules HEAD --
    then
        if [ $err = 0 ]
        then
            echo >&2 "Cannot $1: Your index contains uncommitted changes."
        else
            echo >&2 "Additionally, your index contains uncommitted changes."
        fi
        err=1
    fi

    if [ $err = 1 ]
    then
        test -n "$2" && echo >&2 "$2"
        exit 1
    fi
}

I had a similar problem, but I had to check for added files also. So I did the following:

cd /local/repo
RUN=0
git diff --no-ext-diff --quiet --exit-code || RUN=1
if [ $RUN = 0 ]; then
    RUN=`git ls-files --exclude-standard --others| wc -l`
fi

if [ $RUN = 0 ]; then
    exit 0
fi

git status is your friend

Change to the Git directory for git status to work:

cd c:/path/to/.git

Set a variable to set the work tree so you don't get 'This operation must be run in a work tree' error:

WORKTREE=c:/path/to/worktree

Capture the git status output in a Bash variable

Use --porcelain which guarantees to be in a standard format and parsable:

CHANGED=$(git --work-tree=${WORKTREE} status --porcelain)

If -n (not null), we have changes.

if [ -n "${CHANGED}" ]; then
  echo 'changed';

else
  echo 'not changed';
fi
  • 1
    This has the benefit of detecting untracked files as well. – Luiz C. Jun 10 '15 at 11:53

This works nicely. It will also list the files affected:

if git diff-index --name-status --exit-code HEAD;
then
    echo Git working copy is clean...;
else
    echo ;
    echo ERROR: Git working copy is dirty!;
    echo Commit your changes and try again.;
fi;
  • if you don't want to see the diff git diff --no-ext-diff --quiet --exit-code also does the work. – Alex 10 hours ago

Here is a nice set of Bash script functions that check if there is a diff, prints it to the user and prompts the user if they would like to commit changes before deployment. It is built for a Heroku and Python application, but it needs little change for any other application.

commit(){
    echo "Please enter a commit message..."
    read msg
    git add . --all
    git commit -am $msg
}

check_commit(){
    echo ========== CHECKING FOR CHANGES ========
    changes=$(git diff)
    if [ -n "$changes" ]; then
        echo ""
        echo "*** CHANGES FOUND ***"
        echo "$changes"
        echo ""
        echo "You have uncomitted changes."
        echo "Would you like to commit them (y/n)?"
        read n
        case $n in
            "y") commit;;
            "n") echo "Changes will not be included...";;
            *) echo "invalid option";;
        esac
    else
        echo "... No changes found"
    fi
}

deploy(){
    check_commit
    echo ========== DEPLOYING TO HEROKU ========
    git push heroku master
    heroku run python manage.py syncdb
}

You can copy from Gists on: https://gist.github.com/sshadmand/f33afe7c9071bb725105

Here's how I do it...

CHANGES=`git status | grep "working directory clean"`
if [ ! CHANGES -eq "" ] then
    # do stuff here
else
    echo "You have uncommitted changes..."
fi
  • 3
    I like using git status, but it is better to use --porcelain in scripts and compare the result to an empty string for no changes, since it is guaranteed not to change in an incompatible way across versions. – Paul Chernoch Jun 20 '14 at 18:07

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