30

I'm creating a class that extends Object in JavaScript and expect super() to initialise the keys/values when constructing a new instance of this class.

class ExtObject extends Object {
  constructor(...args) {
    super(...args);
  }
}

const obj = new Object({foo:'bar'});
console.log(obj); // { foo: 'bar' }

const ext = new ExtObject({foo:'bar'});
console.log(ext); // ExtObject {}

console.log(ext.foo); // undefined

Why isn't foo defined as 'bar' on ext in this example?

EDIT

Explanation: Using `super()` when extending `Object`

Solution: Using `super()` when extending `Object`

4
  • 4
    Although I can't answer your question, I can't help but wonder why you would even want to extend Object. Jul 20, 2018 at 9:36
  • 1
    Because I want the instances of the extended class to act the same as Object as well as have custom functionality. I get your point, because I guess the same functionality can be created when not extending Object and using Object.assign() in the constructor, as Gildas.Tambo suggests. But it really makes me wonder why it's not working this way..
    – Tim Baas
    Jul 20, 2018 at 9:44
  • The funny thing about this issue is that Babel can transpile this code to give the correct results Jul 20, 2018 at 9:45
  • 1
    Questions are questions. There are no reason why it should include a link to the answer. You can pin an answer to the top by accepting it, but that's it.
    – user202729
    Jul 20, 2018 at 15:49

3 Answers 3

11

Nobody has actually explained why it doesn't work. If we look at the latest spec, the Object function is defined as follows:

19.1.1.1 Object ( [ value ] )

When Object function is called with optional argument value, the following steps are taken:

  1. If NewTarget is neither undefined nor the active function, then
    1. Return ? OrdinaryCreateFromConstructor(NewTarget, "%ObjectPrototype%").
  2. If value is null, undefined or not supplied, return ObjectCreate(%ObjectPrototype%).
  3. Return ! ToObject(value).

The first step is the important one here: NewTarget refers to the function that new was called upon. So if you do new Object, it will be Object. If you call new ExtObject it will ExtObject.

Because ExtObject is not Object ("nor the active function"), the condition matches and OrdinaryCreateFromConstructor is evaluated and its result returned. As you can see, nothing is done with the value passed to the function.

value is only used if neither 1. nor 2. are fulfilled. And if value is an object, it is simply returned as is, no new object is created. So, new Object(objectValue) is actually the same as Object(objectValue):

var foo = {bar: 42};
console.log(new Object(foo) === foo);
console.log(Object(foo) === foo);

In other words: Object does not copy the properties of the passed in object, it simply returns the object as is. So extending Object wouldn't copy the properties either.

1
  • 1
    Great, finally understand why using Object.create() can only do the same job as Object but cannot add an extend method.
    – MT-FreeHK
    Jul 20, 2018 at 13:54
5

You are missing the Object.assign

class ExtObject extends Object {
  constructor(...args) {
    super(...args);
    Object.assign(this, ...args);
  }
}

const obj = new Object({foo:'bar'});
console.log(obj); // { foo: 'bar' }

const ext = new ExtObject({foo:'bar'});
console.log(ext); // { foo: 'bar' }

console.log(ext.foo); // bar

3
  • Although this works, we wouldn't be needing the extends Object and super() in this case, right? I guess this is more like 'copying' the source of the parents (Object) constructor method?
    – Tim Baas
    Jul 20, 2018 at 9:41
  • 1
    Yes , since we are working with objects try to understand ECMAScript 6 Class and Inheritance and Super class calls with super developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… Jul 20, 2018 at 9:45
  • @TimBaas I am doubt with this ans.... Let say you remove extends Object and super(...args) , everything work well... it is just copying the value.
    – MT-FreeHK
    Jul 20, 2018 at 13:48
5

This answer works only when using the Babel transpiler.

Because Object's constructor returns value. See spec

15.2.2.1 new Object ( [ value ] )
When the Object constructor is called with no arguments or with one argument value, the following steps are taken:
...
8. Returns obj.

class ExtObject extends Object {
  constructor(...args) {
    return super(...args);
  }
}

const obj = new Object({foo:'bar'});
console.log(obj); // { foo: 'bar' }

const ext = new ExtObject({foo:'bar'});
console.log(ext); // { foo: 'bar' }

console.log(ext.foo); // bar

3
  • 2
    @barbsan this is not a valid answer, you are using babel to transpile the code, that is why it worked , in browsers which supports ES6 natively , this will not work Jul 20, 2018 at 10:03
  • 1
    @Caramiriel That's because you're returning a new Object: {foo:'bar'} in the constructor. In barbsan's answer super() is returned which is not a new object but a new instance of this class.
    – Tim Baas
    Jul 20, 2018 at 10:11
  • 1
    @Caramiriel because I selected Babel transpiler in snippet's settings
    – barbsan
    Jul 20, 2018 at 10:58

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