6

Playing with web technologies, I developed a dice using just HTML and CSS (without JavaScript). It's a simple system: a series of radio buttons and labels that simulate the dice by changing their positioning (with z-index) so every time that you click on the dice, there's a "random" number.

This is a minimal version of the code:

@keyframes changeOrder {
  from { z-index: 6;}
  to { z-index: 1; }
}

@-webkit-keyframes changeOrder {
  from { z-index: 6; }
  to { z-index: 1; }
}

label {
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  display: block;
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  line-height:50px;
  background: #eeeeee;
  text-align: center;
  animation: changeOrder 1.2s infinite;
}

label:nth-of-type(1) { animation-delay: 0s; }
label:nth-of-type(2) { animation-delay: -0.2s; }
label:nth-of-type(3) { animation-delay: -0.4s; }
label:nth-of-type(4) { animation-delay: -0.6s; }
label:nth-of-type(5) { animation-delay: -0.8s; }
label:nth-of-type(6) { animation-delay: -1.0s; }
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb1" value="1"/>
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb2" value="2"/>
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb3" value="3"/>
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb4" value="4"/>
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb5" value="5"/>
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb6" value="6"/>
<label for="cb1">1</label>
<label for="cb2">2</label>
<label for="cb3">3</label>
<label for="cb4">4</label>
<label for="cb5">5</label>
<label for="cb6">6</label>

The problem happens when, even when the dice is rolling, it not always takes action when the label is clicked on, and the radio button associated to the label is not activated. Sometimes it does, sometimes it doesn't.

I thought it could be because of the animation I used, and (unsuccessfully) played with the times to see if that would fix the problem... but it basically remains the same. I noticed that if I extend the times, the issue "disappears" (i.e. changing the times to 3s and delays in 0.5s or higher). But if I do that, it is more predictable (the goal is not to make it perfect but at least simulate some pseudo-randomness).

Why could this be happening? What can I do to fix it?

2
  • 1
    If you slow down the animation, it works as expected. I am afraid it might be a timing issue. The animation seems to be too fast for detecting a mouse-click (mouse-down + mouse-up) within the 0.2 seconds (200ms) it is running.
    – blurfus
    Jul 20 '18 at 20:42
  • 1
    @ochi thanks, I was editing to add a note on that. What I find interesting is that I see the radio button graying when clicking on the label, but it doesn't activate. It's like it "gains focus" without checking it. Jul 20 '18 at 20:43
7

As you already noticed it, the issue is due to how fast the animation is. The changes is faster than the click because a click is two actions: mousedown and mouseup and both should be done on the same element.

Here is a better illustration of the issue where you can NEVER make the input checked by clicking on the labels:

label {
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  display: block;
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  line-height:50px;
  background: #eeeeee;
  text-align: center;
}

label:active {
  background:red;
  z-index:-1;
}
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb1" value="1">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb2" value="2">
<label for="cb1">1</label>
<label for="cb2">2</label>

When clicking, the element will be hidden and the mouseup will no more be on the same element thus the click event is not done. The same is happening with your example is some cases.


An Idea to fix this is to allow the click to end by making the clicked element on the top until the end of the click event.

Here is an idea where I rely on a pseudo element with a big z-index so I can keep the click event on the needed element. You can also make the animation faster!

.container {
 position:relative;
}
label {
  display:block;
  position: absolute;
  top:0;
  left:0;
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  line-height:50px;
  background: #eeeeee;
  text-align: center;
  animation: changeOrder 0.6s infinite;
}
@keyframes changeOrder {
  from { z-index: 6;}
  to { z-index: 1; }
}
label:nth-of-type(1) { animation-delay: 0s; }
label:nth-of-type(2) { animation-delay: -0.1s; }
label:nth-of-type(3) { animation-delay: -0.2s; }
label:nth-of-type(4) { animation-delay: -0.3s; }
label:nth-of-type(5) { animation-delay: -0.4s; }
label:nth-of-type(6) { animation-delay: -0.5s; }

label:active {
  /*Mandatory to break the stacking context and allow 
   the pseudo element to be above everything*/
  position:static; 
  /*For illustration*/
  margin-left: 50px;
  background:red;
}

label:active::before {
  content:"";
  position:absolute;
  top:0;
  right:0;
  left:0;
  bottom:0;
  z-index:10;
}
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb1" value="1">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb2" value="2">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb3" value="3">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb4" value="4">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb5" value="5">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb6" value="6">
<div class="container"> 
 <label for="cb1">1</label>
 <label for="cb2">2</label>
 <label for="cb3">3</label>
 <label for="cb4">4</label>
 <label for="cb5">5</label>
 <label for="cb6">6</label>
</div>

8
  • 1
    This is a really ingenious way. It works as I wanted. Thanks! Jul 20 '18 at 23:04
  • 1
    @AlvaroMontoro fell free to answer it there ;) am not good in spanish :p Jul 21 '18 at 13:53
  • 2
    @AlvaroMontoro Hi, yes sure no problem ;) Oct 3 '19 at 8:43
  • 2
    The article was published today, and it cites you (and this answer) as a reference: css-tricks.com/are-there-random-numbers-in-css Oct 29 '19 at 15:05
  • 2
    @AlvaroMontoro good article, well written ;) by the way, I have released my website CSS Challenges (css-challenges.com) if you are intrested in spending time solving some of them or even contributing ;) Oct 29 '19 at 15:14
0

Another method is to use input:active and animation-play-state: paused, like so:

@keyframes changeOrder {
  from { z-index: 6;}
  to { z-index: 1; }
}

@-webkit-keyframes changeOrder {
  from { z-index: 6; }
  to { z-index: 1; }
}

label {
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  display: block;
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  line-height:50px;
  background: #eeeeee;
  text-align: center;
  animation: changeOrder 1.2s infinite;
}

label:nth-of-type(1) { animation-delay: 0s; }
label:nth-of-type(2) { animation-delay: -0.2s; }
label:nth-of-type(3) { animation-delay: -0.4s; }
label:nth-of-type(4) { animation-delay: -0.6s; }
label:nth-of-type(5) { animation-delay: -0.8s; }
label:nth-of-type(6) { animation-delay: -1.0s; }

input:active ~ label {
  animation-play-state: paused;
}
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb1" value="1"/>
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb2" value="2"/>
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb3" value="3"/>
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb4" value="4"/>
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb5" value="5"/>
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb6" value="6"/>
<label for="cb1">1</label>
<label for="cb2">2</label>
<label for="cb3">3</label>
<label for="cb4">4</label>
<label for="cb5">5</label>
<label for="cb6">6</label>

This works as the input actually receives the user's input from things like :active and :hover when the user does it on the corresponding label.

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