3

the code is just a simple:

<div class="top" style="background:green";>
    <div class="inner" style="border: 1px solid white;"></div>
</div>

The inner div has a transparent background so you can only see the border once I define it. I'm trying to have the right and corner border of the inner div intersect, like so:

border-example

The goal is to have that intersection on all four corners.

Cheers :)

3

You can use linear-gradient and you only need one element:

.box {
  margin:30px;
  width:100px;
  height:100px;
  padding:10px;
  background:
   linear-gradient(#fff,#fff) 10px 0,
   linear-gradient(#fff,#fff) 0 10px,
   linear-gradient(#fff,#fff) calc(100% - 10px) 0,
   linear-gradient(#fff,#fff) 0 calc(100% - 10px);
   
 background-size:1px 100%,100% 1px;
 background-repeat:no-repeat;
}

body {
 background:green;
}
<div class="box">

</div>

You can also rely on CSS variable to easily control the intersection:

.box {
  margin:20px;
  width:100px;
  height:100px;
  padding:var(--c,10px);
  background:
   linear-gradient(#fff,#fff) var(--c,10px) 0,
   linear-gradient(#fff,#fff) 0 var(--c,10px),
   linear-gradient(#fff,#fff) calc(100% - var(--c,10px)) 0,
   linear-gradient(#fff,#fff) 0 calc(100% - var(--c,10px));
   
 background-size:1px 100%,100% 1px;
 background-repeat:no-repeat;
 
 display:inline-block;
 box-sizing:border-box;
}

body {
 background:green;
}
<div class="box">
</div>
<div class="box" style="--c:20px;">
</div>
<div class="box" style="--c:0px;">
</div>
<div class="box" style="--c:40px;">
</div>

  • I'm not sure if the div.top is there for some other reason or if it's just there for the green background. I probably shouldn't have put the background on the body element in my example. – BoltClock Jul 21 '18 at 8:59
  • @BoltClock I am pretty sure he was trying to achieve this somehow using the top and the inner elements. I guess at the end, he simply need the visual intersection no matter the method used;) – Temani Afif Jul 21 '18 at 9:08
  • @BoltClock, Temai was right and your solution gives me plenty of leeway on implementation, nice and straighforward, Thanks! – gg93 Jul 23 '18 at 7:10
3

If you can add ::before and ::after pseudo-elements to the inner div, you can have one generate the top and bottom borders and the other generate the left and right borders. Then offset them so that their borders start and end outside the area of the inner div. Not the most elegant solution as it requires the inner div to be positioned, but it works pretty well.

Note that the borders will extend outside of the inner div's area without causing it to be shifted away from its static position, which I'm assuming is the goal here. If you want the div to be constricted, give it positive margins equal to the offset of the borders (so borders with -2px offsets mean giving your inner div 2px margins).

body {
  background: green;
}

.top {
  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
}

.inner {
  position: relative;
  height: 100%; /* To simulate content */
}

.inner::before, .inner::after {
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  border: solid white;
}

.inner::before {
  top: 0;
  right: -2px;
  bottom: 0;
  left: -2px;
  border-width: 1px 0;
}

.inner::after {
  top: -2px;
  right: 0;
  bottom: -2px;
  left: 0;
  border-width: 0 1px;
}
<div class="top">
    <div class="inner"></div>
</div>

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