11

I'm pretty new to Spring, so apologies if I don't see the obvious answer here.

I set up small demo project with a Spring MVC controller and deployed it to App Engine. In my controller I would like to read the content of a static file into a String. What's the best way of doing that?

I googled a bit but I'm probably searching for the wrong thing. I tried the below, but it does not work:

@Controller
@RequestMapping("/myController")
public class MyController {

    @RequestMapping(value = "/test", method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public @ResponseBody String myTest() {

        FileReader fileReader = null;
        BufferedReader bufferedReader = null;
        String content = "";
        try {
            fileReader = new FileReader("file:/WEB-INF/content/somecontent.txt");
            bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(fileReader);
            content = bufferedReader.readLine();
            bufferedReader.close(); 
        }
        catch (Exception ignored) { 
            // ignore
        }
        return content;
    }
}

Any push into the right direction will be highly appreciated :-)

1
  • 1
    Hell... sure enough, a second after asking the question here I got it working... The correct path in the FileReader should be "WEB-INF/content/somecontent.txt" I leaving the question open for now, because I feel, this is not the most elegant way how to do that.
    – StefanS
    Feb 28, 2011 at 19:35

4 Answers 4

15

Servlet containers in general, and GAE in particular, won't let you use the File API from within the servlet container like that.

Instead, autowire your controller with the ServletContext, and fetch the resource from that. Also, your exception handling isn't great, you shouldn't ignore exceptions like that, they're there for a reason.

Something like should be OK:

@Controller
@RequestMapping("/myController")
public class MyController {

    private @Autowired ServletContext servletContext;

    @RequestMapping(value = "/test", method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public @ResponseBody String myTest() throws IOException {
        InputStream inputStream = null;
        try {
            inputStream = servletContext.getResourceAsStream("/WEB-INF/content/somecontent.txt");
            BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(inputStream));
            return bufferedReader.readLine();
        } finally {
            if (inputStream != null) {
               inputStream.close();
            }
        }
    }
}

Alternatively, if you're using Spring 3.x, this might be even simpler:

<mvc:view-controller path="/test" view-name="/WEB-INF/content/somecontent.txt"/>

See docs for what this does, but it may mean you can avoid any code.

2
  • Brilliant, that works. Thanks! Regarding the exception handling: 100% agree, I just tried to keep it short because it wasn't essential ;-)
    – StefanS
    Feb 28, 2011 at 19:54
  • Is it still legal and best practice if I do this in the Service layer? :D
    – user1685185
    Feb 12, 2014 at 9:37
9

The notation "file:" and "classpath:" isn't right with FileReader. I suggest you to create a FileSystemResource

FileSystemResource resource = new FileSystemResource("/WEB-INF/content/somecontent.txt");

and then to use getFile() or getInputStream() to read file. This is very useful in a web application, because you can use relative path.

0
6

Are you sure you need encoding conversion introduced by reading a file contents via Reader and returning it as String?

If no (i.e. if you want to serve a file as is), you can use request forwarding:

@RequestMapping(value = "/test", method = RequestMethod.GET)
public View myTest() {
    return new InternalResourceView("/WEB-INF/content/somecontent.txt");
}

or even (if you have InternalViewResolver):

@RequestMapping(value = "/test", method = RequestMethod.GET)
public String myTest() {
    return "forward:/WEB-INF/content/somecontent.txt";
}

If yes, note that you didn't specify encoding when reading file, so that system default encoding is used and behaviour of your application is system-dependent.

1

Since this is a Spring application, you can rely on it's classes to help with this. In particular, org.springframework.web.context.support.ServletContextResource should prove quite useful:

ServletContextResource resource = new ServletContextResource(servletContext, 
    "/WEB-INF/content/somecontent.txt");

BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(
    new InputStreamReader(resource.getInputStream()));
1
  • 1
    ServletContextResource doesn't bring you any benefit here, though; you may as well just get it from the ServletContext directly.
    – skaffman
    Feb 28, 2011 at 19:53

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