30

I have been playing with HTML and CSS to create a simple 2-player board game without using any JavaScript. I use labels, radio buttons, and checkboxes to create different states and mimic some logic so the piece will move around the board.

It works "fine", although the usability is not great. For example, after clicking on the dice, the tile moves, and I display a button to change to the next player (controlled again with a label and a checkbox)... which is not great, it would be better if it changed player "automatically."

The problem is that the <label> can only target one element, and I don't know how to trigger two "actions" (or side-effects) with only one click.

The following code is an mcve to better visualize the problem: there are two players (specified by turns), a board with three tiles (represented by 6 radio buttons: 1 per player and tile), and two buttons to change player turn (only one visible). If you click on the turn change button, the turn will go to the next player. (A more complex example can be found here)

The problem is that the users are forced to press the button to change turn, otherwise the same player will always be active. Is there a way to make so that when a label is clicked on, not only the the tile gets activated, but also the turn is changed? Or in its absence, is there an alternative to achieve this? (without using JS)

#p1:checked ~ [for=p1],
#p1:checked ~ [for^=tile-p2],
#p1:checked ~ [name^=tile-p2],
#p2:checked ~ [for=p2],
#p2:checked ~ [for^=tile-p1],
#p2:checked ~ [name^=tile-p1]
{ 
  display: none; 
}

/* more rules to hide/show more elements */
<h1>Players:</h1>
<input type="radio" id="p1" name="player" checked /> P1
<input type="radio" id="p2" name="player" /> P2

<h1>Board: </h1>
Player 1:
<input type="radio" id="tile-p1-1" name="tile-p1" checked />
<label for="tile-p1-1">P1 to 1</label>
<input type="radio" id="tile-p1-2" name="tile-p1" />
<label for="tile-p1-2">P1 to 2</label>
<input type="radio" id="tile-p1-3" name="tile-p1" />
<label for="tile-p1-3">P1 to 3</label>
<br/>
Player 2:
<input type="radio" id="tile-p2-1" name="tile-p2" checked />
<label for="tile-p2-1">P2 to 1</label>
<input type="radio" id="tile-p2-2" name="tile-p2" />
<label for="tile-p2-2">P2 to 2</label>
<input type="radio" id="tile-p2-3" name="tile-p2" />
<label for="tile-p2-3">P2 to 3</label>

<h1>Change of turn:</h1>
<label for="p2">Change to Player 2</label>
<label for="p1">Change to Player 1</label>

Is there any way to trigger two "state changes" by clicking on just one <label> or <a>?


Some attempts at solving this:

I tried putting an <a> inside a <label> to be able to trigger two readable changes: :target and :checked (with the :target I would control the player's turn, and with the :checked it would be the piece position). It seems to be valid HTML (at least according to the W3C validator), but it doesn't really work. For example, in the next snippet, clicking on the first link will highlight the text, clicking on the second will mark the box, and (I hoped) clicking on the third would do both... but it doesn't:

#test:target {
  color: red;
}

#cb:checked

a, label {
  display: block;
  text-decoration: underline;
  color: blue;
}
<input type="checkbox" id="cb" />
<div id="test">TEST</div>

<a href="#test">Highlight test</a>
<label for="cb">Check the box</label>
<label for="cb">
  <a href="#test">Highlight test AND check the box</a>
</label>

I also tried playing with different pseudo-classes: :checked and :invalid. It didn't do much for a checkbox, as they both would apply at the same time, and from my tests, required doesn't apply to a single radio (but I may be doing something wrong):

div {
  color: purple;
}

#radio1:checked ~ div {
  color: blue;
}

#radio2:checked ~ div {
  color: fuchsia;
}

#radio1:invalid ~ div {
  color: red;
}

#radio1:invalid + #radio2:checked ~ div {
  color: green;
}
<input type="radio" name="radio1" id="radio1" required />
<input type="radio" name="radio1" id="radio2" />

<div>Text to be green if radio2 is checked</div>

  • Why do you not want to use Javascript? – user10108359 Jul 23 '18 at 17:50
  • @sdlfyeiwyrw there’s no reason in particular. It was just a constraint to make it a challenge project. – Alvaro Montoro Jul 23 '18 at 17:59
  • Do you mean no Javascript at all or just no Javascript event handlers on the label. – user10108359 Jul 23 '18 at 18:05
  • 1
    @TemaniAfif the styling of the Dice has credits to your answer (line 223 of the codepen). It would have been too much code for a minified example here ;) – Alvaro Montoro Jul 30 '18 at 15:58
  • 1
    Isn't this what you're looking for? stackoverflow.com/questions/33899682/… – Ronald Diemicke Jul 30 '18 at 16:07
9
+500

One idea is to consider the :focus state on the label that will allow you to trigger two changes. The only drawback is that the :focus state will be enabled only on the mousedown and disabled on the mouseup.

Here is an example

label:focus + #test {
 color: red;
}

label {
  display: block;
  text-decoration: underline;
  color: blue;
}
<input type="checkbox" id="cb" >

<label for="cb"  tabindex=-1>Check the box and highlight the text</label>
<div id="test">TEST</div>

UPDATE

Using the above logic and considering the initial code of the dice game here is an idea using animation. The trick is to create a paused animation with 2 states and on :focus I make the animation running in order to switch between the states.

Of course, this is not 100% accurate as it will depend on the speed of the click but it can be an idea to consider:

.container {
  position: relative;
}

label {
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  line-height: 50px;
  background: #eeeeee;
  text-align: center;
  animation: changeOrder 0.6s infinite;
}

@keyframes changeOrder {
  from { z-index: 6;}
   to { z-index: 1; }
}
label:nth-of-type(1) { animation-delay: 0s; }
label:nth-of-type(2) { animation-delay: -0.1s; }
label:nth-of-type(3) { animation-delay: -0.2s; }
label:nth-of-type(4) { animation-delay: -0.3s; }
label:nth-of-type(5) { animation-delay: -0.4s; }
label:nth-of-type(6) { animation-delay: -0.5s; }


label:active {
  /*Mandatory to break the stacking context and allow 
       the pseudo element to be above everything*/
  position: static;
  /*For illustration*/
  margin-left: 50px;
  background: red;
}

label:active::before {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  right: 0;
  left: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  z-index: 10;
}
.player {
  display:inline-block;
  margin-top:80px;
}

.player:before {
 content:"Player One";
 animation: player .3s infinite step-end;
 animation-play-state: paused;
}

label:focus ~ .player:before{
 animation-play-state: running;
}

@keyframes player {
  0% {
     content:"Player One";
  }
  50% {
     content:"Player Two";
  }

}
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb1" value="1">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb2" value="2">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb3" value="3">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb4" value="4">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb5" value="5">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb6" value="6">
<div class="container">
  <label for="cb1" tabindex="-1">1</label>
  <label for="cb2" tabindex="-1">2</label>
  <label for="cb3" tabindex="-1">3</label>
  <label for="cb4" tabindex="-1">4</label>
  <label for="cb5" tabindex="-1">5</label>
  <label for="cb6" tabindex="-1">6</label>
  <span class="player" ></span>
</div>

In case you want a static permanent effect, it's pretty simple as you only need to make the duration very small and use forwards.

.container {
  position: relative;
}

label {
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  line-height: 50px;
  background: #eeeeee;
  text-align: center;
  animation: changeOrder 0.6s infinite;
}

@keyframes changeOrder {
  from { z-index: 6;}
   to { z-index: 1; }
}
label:nth-of-type(1) { animation-delay: 0s; }
label:nth-of-type(2) { animation-delay: -0.1s; }
label:nth-of-type(3) { animation-delay: -0.2s; }
label:nth-of-type(4) { animation-delay: -0.3s; }
label:nth-of-type(5) { animation-delay: -0.4s; }
label:nth-of-type(6) { animation-delay: -0.5s; }


label:active {
  /*Mandatory to break the stacking context and allow 
       the pseudo element to be above everything*/
  position: static;
  /*For illustration*/
  margin-left: 50px;
  background: red;
}

label:active::before {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  right: 0;
  left: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  z-index: 10;
}
.player {
  display:inline-block;
  margin-top:80px;
}

.player:before {
 content:"Click the dice!";
 animation: player .1s forwards;
 animation-play-state: paused;
}

label:focus ~ .player:before{
 animation-play-state: running;
}

@keyframes player {
  2%,100% {
     content:"Dice clicked!";
  }

}
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb1" value="1">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb2" value="2">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb3" value="3">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb4" value="4">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb5" value="5">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb6" value="6">
<div class="container">
  <label for="cb1" tabindex="-1">1</label>
  <label for="cb2" tabindex="-1">2</label>
  <label for="cb3" tabindex="-1">3</label>
  <label for="cb4" tabindex="-1">4</label>
  <label for="cb5" tabindex="-1">5</label>
  <label for="cb6" tabindex="-1">6</label>
  <span class="player" ></span>
</div>

UPDATE 2

Here is another idea that rely on transition and is more accurate BUT I need to rely on two dice as each one will trigger a specific state in order to change the text, so we need to find a way how to make both dice above each other and change their order on click:

.container {
  position:relative;
  margin-top:20px;
  overflow:hidden;
  min-height:50px;
}

label {
  display:block;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  line-height: 50px;
  background: #eeeeee;
  text-align: center;
  animation: changeOrder 0.6s infinite;
}
label:active {
  /*Mandatory to break the stacking context and allow 
       the pseudo element to be above everything*/
  position: static;
  width:0;
  height:0;
  overflow:hidden;
}

label:active::before {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  right: 0;
  left: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  z-index: 10;
}

@keyframes changeOrder {
  from { z-index: 6;}
   to { z-index: 1; }
}
label:nth-of-type(1),label:nth-of-type(7) { animation-delay: 0s; }
label:nth-of-type(2),label:nth-of-type(8) { animation-delay: -0.1s; }
label:nth-of-type(3),label:nth-of-type(9) { animation-delay: -0.2s; }
label:nth-of-type(4),label:nth-of-type(10) { animation-delay: -0.3s; }
label:nth-of-type(5),label:nth-of-type(11) { animation-delay: -0.4s; }
label:nth-of-type(6),label:nth-of-type(12) { animation-delay: -0.5s; }



label.second {
  left:100px;
}

.player {
  display:inline-block;
  margin-top:80px;
  height: 18px;
  overflow:hidden;
}
.player span {
  display:block;
  margin-top:-18px;
  transition:1000s;
}



label.first:focus ~ .player span{
  margin-top:0;
  transition:0s;
}
label.second:focus ~ .player span{
  margin-top:-36px;
  transition:0s;
}
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb1" value="1">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb2" value="2">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb3" value="3">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb4" value="4">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb5" value="5">
<input type="radio" name="cb" id="cb6" value="6">
<div class="container">
<label class="first" for="cb1" tabindex="-1">1</label>
<label class="first" for="cb2" tabindex="-1">2</label>
<label class="first" for="cb3" tabindex="-1">3</label>
<label class="first" for="cb4" tabindex="-1">4</label>
<label class="first" for="cb5" tabindex="-1">5</label>
<label class="first" for="cb6" tabindex="-1">6</label>
  
<label class="second" for="cb1" tabindex="-1">1</label>
<label class="second" for="cb2" tabindex="-1">2</label>
<label class="second" for="cb3" tabindex="-1">3</label>
<label class="second" for="cb4" tabindex="-1">4</label>
<label class="second" for="cb5" tabindex="-1">5</label>
<label class="second" for="cb6" tabindex="-1">6</label>

<div class="player">
 <span> Player One Clicked<br>
  Which player?<br>
  Player Two clicked
 </span>
</div>
</div>

As a side note, I have used :focus and :active so we can rely on thoses states as they can be triggered together even with nested element:

div {
  display:block;
  outline: none;
  padding:10px 0;
}
.first:active + div{
  color:red
}
.second:active + div{
  color:red
}

.first:focus + div{
  border:1px solid red
}
.second:focus + div{
  border:1px solid red
}
<div class="first" tabindex=-1 >
  Click me (only last text will change)
  <div class="second" tabindex=-1 >
    Click me (both text will change)
  </div>
  <div>
    I will be updated
  </div>
</div>
<div>
  I will be updated
</div>

  • 1
    I tried something similar to this but with the :active on the label. It didn't work as it was only available while mouse was down. Tried combining it with a counter (didn't work), now testing with animation delay to see if I could at least hide the dice/next button when the user clicks on something, but no results so far. – Alvaro Montoro Jul 30 '18 at 16:43
  • 1
    @AlvaroMontoro I may also have an idea with animation ... where the animation will hold your states and you maybe playing with pause/playing, etc ... Will dig into this more later ;) – Temani Afif Jul 30 '18 at 19:07
  • @AlvaroMontoro I made an update with another solution, it should be close to what you want but still need some tweaking to make it accurate, will work on this ;) – Temani Afif Jul 31 '18 at 10:01
  • The last example is the same issue I face right now: once the dice has been clicked, it is impossible to know if the click happened as part of this round or the previous one. It is always "dice clicked". – Alvaro Montoro Jul 31 '18 at 13:07
  • 2
    Thanks! This approach was not 100% what I needed, but it helped me look and search for alternatives to mimic what I wanted. – Alvaro Montoro Aug 6 '18 at 11:49
4

Regarding you question it's impossible to target multiple elements via the for attribute of an html label element.

But if a page reload is fine to start a new game, you won't really need to target two input at once with a label.

Here's a simple dice game using only CSS:

.board {
  width: 100%;
  height: 200px;
  background: green;
  position: relative;
}

.board .title {
  color: white;
  font-weight: 300;
  text-align: center;
}

.board .title #p2-turn {
  display: none;
}

.dice {
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  position: absolute;
  left: 50%;
  top: 50%;
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
  background: white;
  cursor: pointer;
  text-align: center;
}

.dice .pips {
  position: absolute;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  left: 0;
  animation: diceRoll 600ms infinite;
  z-index: 10;
}

.dice:active .pips {
  animation-play-state: paused;
}


.dice .pips:nth-child(2) { animation-delay: 100ms; }
.dice .pips:nth-child(3) { animation-delay: 200ms; }
.dice .pips:nth-child(4) { animation-delay: 300ms; }
.dice .pips:nth-child(5) { animation-delay: 400ms; }
.dice .pips:nth-child(6) { animation-delay: 500ms; }

.dice.dice--p2 {
  display: none;
}

.results {
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
  top: 30px;
  bottom: 0;
  right: 0;
  background: black;
  color: white;
  display: none;
  text-align: center;
  line-height: 100px;
}

.results > .result {
  display: none;
}


@keyframes diceRoll {
  from { 
    z-index: 6;
  }
  to { 
    z-index: 1;
  }
}

/* LOGIC */

[name="p1-result"]:checked ~ .board .title #p1-turn {
  display: none;
}

[name="p1-result"]:checked ~ .board .title #p2-turn {
  display: block;
}

[name="p1-result"]:checked ~ .board .dice--p1 {
  display: none;
}

[name="p1-result"]:checked ~ .board .dice--p2 {
  display: block;
}

[name="p1-result"]:checked ~ [name="p2-result"]:checked ~ .results {
  display: block;
}



#p1-result-2:checked ~ #p2-result-1:checked ~ .results #p1-results,
#p1-result-3:checked ~ #p2-result-1:checked ~ .results #p1-results,
#p1-result-4:checked ~ #p2-result-1:checked ~ .results #p1-results,
#p1-result-5:checked ~ #p2-result-1:checked ~ .results #p1-results,
#p1-result-6:checked ~ #p2-result-1:checked ~ .results #p1-results,
#p1-result-3:checked ~ #p2-result-2:checked ~ .results #p1-results,
#p1-result-4:checked ~ #p2-result-2:checked ~ .results #p1-results,
#p1-result-5:checked ~ #p2-result-2:checked ~ .results #p1-results,
#p1-result-6:checked ~ #p2-result-2:checked ~ .results #p1-results,
#p1-result-4:checked ~ #p2-result-3:checked ~ .results #p1-results,
#p1-result-5:checked ~ #p2-result-3:checked ~ .results #p1-results,
#p1-result-6:checked ~ #p2-result-3:checked ~ .results #p1-results,
#p1-result-5:checked ~ #p2-result-4:checked ~ .results #p1-results,
#p1-result-6:checked ~ #p2-result-4:checked ~ .results #p1-results,
#p1-result-6:checked ~ #p2-result-5:checked ~ .results #p1-results,

#p1-result-1:checked ~ #p2-result-2:checked ~ .results #p2-results,
#p1-result-1:checked ~ #p2-result-3:checked ~ .results #p2-results,
#p1-result-1:checked ~ #p2-result-4:checked ~ .results #p2-results,
#p1-result-1:checked ~ #p2-result-5:checked ~ .results #p2-results,
#p1-result-1:checked ~ #p2-result-6:checked ~ .results #p2-results,
#p1-result-2:checked ~ #p2-result-3:checked ~ .results #p2-results,
#p1-result-2:checked ~ #p2-result-4:checked ~ .results #p2-results,
#p1-result-2:checked ~ #p2-result-5:checked ~ .results #p2-results,
#p1-result-2:checked ~ #p2-result-6:checked ~ .results #p2-results,
#p1-result-3:checked ~ #p2-result-4:checked ~ .results #p2-results,
#p1-result-3:checked ~ #p2-result-5:checked ~ .results #p2-results,
#p1-result-3:checked ~ #p2-result-6:checked ~ .results #p2-results,
#p1-result-4:checked ~ #p2-result-5:checked ~ .results #p2-results,
#p1-result-4:checked ~ #p2-result-6:checked ~ .results #p2-results,
#p1-result-5:checked ~ #p2-result-6:checked ~ .results #p2-results {
  display: block;
}

#p1-result-1:checked ~ #p2-result-1:checked ~ .results #draw,
#p1-result-2:checked ~ #p2-result-2:checked ~ .results #draw,
#p1-result-3:checked ~ #p2-result-3:checked ~ .results #draw,
#p1-result-4:checked ~ #p2-result-4:checked ~ .results #draw,
#p1-result-5:checked ~ #p2-result-5:checked ~ .results #draw,
#p1-result-6:checked ~ #p2-result-6:checked ~ .results #draw {
  display: block;
}
<input type="radio" name="p1-result" id="p1-result-1" value="1">
<input type="radio" name="p1-result" id="p1-result-2" value="2">
<input type="radio" name="p1-result" id="p1-result-3" value="3">
<input type="radio" name="p1-result" id="p1-result-4" value="4">
<input type="radio" name="p1-result" id="p1-result-5" value="5">
<input type="radio" name="p1-result" id="p1-result-6" value="6">

<input type="radio" name="p2-result" id="p2-result-1" value="1">
<input type="radio" name="p2-result" id="p2-result-2" value="2">
<input type="radio" name="p2-result" id="p2-result-3" value="3">
<input type="radio" name="p2-result" id="p2-result-4" value="4">
<input type="radio" name="p2-result" id="p2-result-5" value="5">
<input type="radio" name="p2-result" id="p2-result-6" value="6">


<div class="board">
  <h2 class="title">
    Player
    <span class="turn" id="p1-turn">1</span>
    <span class="turn" id="p2-turn">2</span>
    turn 
  </h2>
  <div class="dice dice--p1">
    roll
    <label class="pips" for="p1-result-1"></label>
    <label class="pips" for="p1-result-2"></label>
    <label class="pips" for="p1-result-3"></label>
    <label class="pips" for="p1-result-4"></label>
    <label class="pips" for="p1-result-5"></label>
    <label class="pips" for="p1-result-6"></label>
  </div>

  <div class="dice dice--p2">
    <label class="pips" for="p2-result-1"></label>
    <label class="pips" for="p2-result-2"></label>
    <label class="pips" for="p2-result-3"></label>
    <label class="pips" for="p2-result-4"></label>
    <label class="pips" for="p2-result-5"></label>
    <label class="pips" for="p2-result-6"></label>
  </div>
</div>

<div class="results">
  <div class="result" id="p1-results">Player 1 won!</div>
  <div class="result" id="p2-results">Player 2 won!</div>
  <div class="result" id="draw">Draw!</div>
</div>

This could be easily adapted to display the players current tiles and determain a certain outcome.

3

I honestly don't think there's any method that can toggle multiple checkbox states using only HTML and CSS.

That's not to say that it couldn't be made more intuitive with CSS by styling the elements in a way that makes switching between players feel more like it's simply part of the process.

I whipped up a quick-and-dirty, example snippet that provides a method of implementation (using basic opacity and cursor styles). However, this method can be utilized throughout a number of different approaches.

For instance, you could move the die off-screen altogether, or toggle a div in order to block elements from being seen/clicked (using absolute positioning and z-index).

In fact, the z-index approach could be used in order to allow player switching without having to move the cursor at all, thereby making it more intuitive from the player's perspective.

Die rolling.

Hopefully these ideas will help get the ball -- or die, rolling. 😁

/* Simple Checkbox Hack */

input[type=checkbox] {
  position: absolute;
  left: -9999px;
  }

.die { 
  position: absolute;
  height: 5em;
  width: 5em;
  background: lightgray;
  border: 1pt solid gray;
  text-align: center;
  text-decoration: none;
  display: inline-block;
  font-size: 16px;
  line-height: 5em;
  margin: .5em;
  cursor: pointer;
  }



/* Default State */

.p1, .p2 {
  width: 30em;
  height: 2em;
  line-height: 2em;
  color: white;
  text-align: center;
  opacity: 0.3;
  cursor: not-allowed;
  }

.p1 {
  background: green;
  }

.p2 {
  background: blue;
  }



/* Toggled State */

input[type=checkbox]:checked ~ .p1 {
   opacity: 1;
   cursor: pointer;
}
input[type=checkbox]:checked ~ .die {
   opacity: 0.3;
   cursor: not-allowed;
}
<small style="color: gray;"> (For this example, die can be clicked more than once.) </small>
<br>
<input type="checkbox" id="toggle-1">
<label class="die" for="toggle-1">Roll me!</label>
<br> <br> <br> <br> <br> <br>
<div class="p1">Player 1 - Click to start.</div>
<div class="p2">Player 2 - Click to start.</div>

  • This could be a good idea (hiding the button/dice after clicking on it), the thing is that the way I have it (radio buttons controlling the piece position), I cannot detect a radio change: I can detect it in the sense of the value changing and the piece moving on the board, but I am missing a sense of time. For example: moving from tile 58 to 62, how do I know that I should hide the button? the movement is easy, using tile62:checked, but how would the hiding be in CSS? How do I know that the checked radio button was checked now and not in the previous round? – Alvaro Montoro Jul 30 '18 at 17:27
  • Also, in the example that you put, player 2 doesn't seem to activate at all. – Alvaro Montoro Jul 30 '18 at 17:37
  • As @AlvaroMontoro mentioned "player 2 doesn't seem to activate at all". – user10145552 Jul 30 '18 at 21:36
  • That's because I just used a div, and not a label for the "Player Switch". It was just hastily made as an example. To be honest, I mistakenly thought you were using a dice similar to the snakes-and-ladders example. However, if there's only one move per player, the same would still work. A move would cause the "Player Switch" styling -- then clicking the "Player Switch" overlay would remove the styling. Effectively just toggling the CSS back and forth. – Dustin Halstead Jul 31 '18 at 20:39
3

Edited answer to reflect changes to original question:

Try setting different states where each state reflects both the active player and the position of the pieces, like:

input {
  position: absolute;
  bottom: 1em;
  right: 1em;
  margin: 2px;
}

.status {
  margin: 1em;
  font-family: sans-serif;
  display: none;
}
.active1:checked ~ #status1,
.active2:checked ~ #status2,
.win1:checked ~ #status3,
.win2:checked ~ #status4 {
  display: block
}

#board {
  position: relative;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  border: 1px solid black;
  padding: 2px 3px;
  margin: 1em auto;
  width: 27em;
  height: 12em;
}
#board:before {
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  margin: 2px;
  height: 9em;
  width: 9em;
  background: silver;
  content: ' ';
}
#board:after {
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  bottom: 0;;
  right: 0;
  margin: 2px;
  height: 9em;
  width: 9em;
  background: silver;
  content: ' ';
}

.piece {
  position: absolute;
  z-index: 2;
  width: 1em;
  height: 1em;
  padding: 1em;
  margin: 1px;
  border-radius: 666em;
  line-height: 1em;
  text-align: center;
}
#piece1 {
  background: white;
  color: black;
  border: 1px solid black;
}
#piece2 {
  background: black;
  color: white;
  border: 1px solid white;
}
.win2:checked ~ #piece1,
.win1:checked ~ #piece2 {
  display: none;
}
.active1:checked ~ #piece1,
.active2:checked ~ #piece2 {
  border: 1px solid red;
}
.p1_1:checked ~ #piece1,
.p2_1:checked ~ #piece2 {
  left: 3em;
  bottom: 3em;
}
.p1_2:checked ~ #piece1,
.p2_2:checked ~ #piece2 {
  left: 12em;
  bottom: 3em;
}
.p1_3:checked ~ #piece1,
.p2_3:checked ~ #piece2 {
  right: 3em;
  bottom: 3em;
}

label {
  display: none;
  position: absolute;
  bottom: 0;
  z-index: 3;
  width: 9em;
  height: 9em;
  margin: 2px;
  text-indent: -666666em;
  /*background: green;*/
  opacity: .25;
  cursor: pointer;
}
label.pos1 {
  left: 0;
}
label.pos2 {
  left: 9em;
  margin: 2px 3px;
}
label.pos3 {
  right: 0
}
label.restart {
   top: 0;
   left: 0;
   width: 27em;
   height: 12em;
   padding: 0 1px;
   /*background: orange;*/
}
label.win1,
label.win2 {
  /*background: blue;*/
}
.active1.p2_1:checked ~ label.active1.opp1,
.active1.p2_2:checked ~ label.active1.opp2,
.active1.p2_3:checked ~ label.active1.opp3,
.active2.p1_1:checked ~ label.active2.opp1,
.active2.p1_2:checked ~ label.active2.opp2,
.active2.p1_3:checked ~ label.active2.opp3 {
  display: block;
}
.active1.p1_1:checked ~ label.active1.pos1,
.active1.p1_2:checked ~ label.active1.pos2,
.active1.p1_3:checked ~ label.active1.pos3,
.active2.p2_1:checked ~ label.active2.pos1,
.active2.p2_2:checked ~ label.active2.pos2,
.active2.p2_3:checked ~ label.active2.pos3 {
  display: none;
}
.active1.p2_1:checked ~ label.win1.pos1,
.active1.p2_2:checked ~ label.win1.pos2,
.active1.p2_3:checked ~ label.win1.pos3,
.active2.p1_1:checked ~ label.win2.pos1,
.active2.p1_2:checked ~ label.win2.pos2,
.active2.p1_3:checked ~ label.win2.pos3 {
  display: block;
}
.win1:checked ~ label.restart,
.win2:checked ~ label.restart {
  display: block;
}
<html>
  <head>
    <meta charset="utf-8">
    <title>some game</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div id="board">
      <input id="s1" class="active1 p1_1 p2_2" type="radio" name="state" value="1">
      <input id="s2" class="active1 p1_1 p2_3" type="radio" name="state" value="2" checked="checked">
      <input id="s3" class="active1 p1_2 p2_1" type="radio" name="state" value="3">
      <input id="s4" class="active1 p1_2 p2_3" type="radio" name="state" value="4">
      <input id="s5" class="active1 p1_3 p2_1" type="radio" name="state" value="5">
      <input id="s6" class="active1 p1_3 p2_2" type="radio" name="state" value="6">
      <input id="s7" class="active2 p1_1 p2_2" type="radio" name="state" value="7">
      <input id="s8" class="active2 p1_1 p2_3" type="radio" name="state" value="8">
      <input id="s9" class="active2 p1_2 p2_1" type="radio" name="state" value="9">
      <input id="s10" class="active2 p1_2 p2_3" type="radio" name="state" value="10">
      <input id="s11" class="active2 p1_3 p2_1" type="radio" name="state" value="11">
      <input id="s12" class="active2 p1_3 p2_2" type="radio" name="state" value="12">
      <input id="s13" class="win1 p1_1" type="radio" name="state" value="13">
      <input id="s14" class="win1 p1_2" type="radio" name="state" value="14">
      <input id="s15" class="win1 p1_3" type="radio" name="state" value="15">
      <input id="s16" class="win2 p2_1" type="radio" name="state" value="16">
      <input id="s17" class="win2 p2_2" type="radio" name="state" value="17">
      <input id="s18" class="win2 p2_3" type="radio" name="state" value="18">
      <div id="status1" class="status">Player 1:</div>
      <div id="status2" class="status">Player 2:</div>
      <div id="status3" class="status">Player 1 won!</div>
      <div id="status4" class="status">Player 2 won!</div>
      <div id="piece1" class="piece">p1</div>
      <div id="piece2" class="piece">p2</div>
      <label for="s1" class="active2 pos2 opp1">Player 2: move piece to position 2</label>
      <label for="s2" class="active2 pos3 opp1">Player 2: move piece to position 3</label>
      <label for="s3" class="active2 pos1 opp2">Player 2: move piece to position 1</label>
      <label for="s4" class="active2 pos3 opp2">Player 2: move piece to position 3</label>
      <label for="s5" class="active2 pos1 opp3">Player 2: move piece to position 1</label>
      <label for="s6" class="active2 pos2 opp3">Player 2: move piece to position 2</label>
      <label for="s7" class="active1 pos1 opp2">Player 1: move piece to position 1</label>
      <label for="s8" class="active1 pos1 opp3">Player 1: move piece to position 1</label>
      <label for="s9" class="active1 pos2 opp1">Player 1: move piece to position 2</label>
      <label for="s10" class="active1 pos2 opp3">Player 1: move piece to position 2</label>
      <label for="s11" class="active1 pos3 opp1">Player 1: move piece to position 3</label>
      <label for="s12" class="active1 pos3 opp2">Player 1: move piece to position 3</label>
      <label for="s13" class="win1 pos1">Player 1: move piece to position 1</label>
      <label for="s14" class="win1 pos2">Player 1: move piece to position 2</label>
      <label for="s15" class="win1 pos3">Player 1: move piece to position 3</label>
      <label for="s16" class="win2 pos1">Player 2: move piece to position 1</label>
      <label for="s17" class="win2 pos2">Player 2: move piece to position 2</label>
      <label for="s18" class="win2 pos3">Player 2: move piece to position 3</label>
      <label for="s2" class="restart">Restart game</label>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

This is just some very simple example, where each player can move his piece to any field he wants and if his opponent's piece 'happens' to be on that field he wins.

In a real world scenario you might consider using some HTML- and CSS-preprocessors, like Pug / Jade and Sass to iterate over all the possible state combinations.

Update

I couldn't get this out of my head, so I played around a bit ...

:focus seemed to be a nice starting point, so I tried (hint: make sure to set tabindex="0"on the <label>s). But there's always some order to things and I couldn't find a way to achieve bidirectional relations using ~.

So I got back to my comment from yesterday, about making the UX of the 'next player' button more 'fluent'. Here is my code (the basic idea is to change the 'next player' button to a 'confirm move' state, where the player either can confirm their move or chose another tile to move to). No, it's no answer to your question, but it seems like a solution to your problem (and it scales 'nicely' more or less, at least linear, not cubical). html/css seems a bit bulky to post in here and Jade/Sass I couldn't get to work, so here's the links to those files:

  • I am sorry, I think the order of the examples/snippets was confusing (I have reordered now). I am actually using radio buttons instead of checkboxes. – Alvaro Montoro Jul 30 '18 at 17:17
  • I considered something like this, and I'm using Pug to preprocess all this to write as less code as possible. But when I tried it, I had some performance issues (the original game was 2 players, I was trying to push it to 4 players and that generated thousands of combinations (the board has 100 tiles) and radio buttons that affected the page load an usability. But this may be one possible option (performance issues aside) as it would reflect better the states of the game/machine. – Alvaro Montoro Jul 31 '18 at 14:16
  • @AlvaroMontoro Well, the number of states is [number of fields]^2 * [number of players], so the significant part is the number of fields, not the number of players ... and as far as I can tell, with the answer you're looking for, you'd still end up with the same number of states, you would just reduce the code for the triggering mechanisms by a factor of 0.5. – Chris Scheurle Jul 31 '18 at 18:22
  • @AlvaroMontoro Of course, you could always just change the text of the 'next player' button to 'Confirm move' ... wouldn't change a thing, but feels more 'fluent'. :) – Chris Scheurle Jul 31 '18 at 18:42
  • @AlvaroMontoro i just re-read your question, and well, seems like what I head in mind when i read 'board-game' wasn't what your meant. But still, you could make this a two-step process, mimicing the real world, by splitting 1 player's turn into the steps 'throw dice' and 'move'. Btw: the game looks great! :)' – Chris Scheurle Aug 1 '18 at 21:53
-1

Is this what you're looking for?

.boxes {
  height: 80px;
  width: 80px;
  background-color: white;
  border: 1px solid black;
  position: relative;
}

.boxes span {
  position: absolute;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
}

.boxes a div {
  display: none;
}

.boxes a:target div {
  display: block;
  height: 80px;
  width: 80px;
  background-color: black;
  border: 1px solid black;
  position: absolute;
  margin-left: 150px;
}

.boxes a:target span {
  background-color: black;
}

a {
  color: white;
}
<div class="boxes">
  <a href="#firstgroup" id="firstgroup">
    <span>Box A</span>
    <div>Box B</div>
  </a>
</div>

<div class="boxes">
  <a href="#secondgroup" id="secondgroup">
    <span>Box C</span>
    <div>Box D</div>
  </a>
</div>

This uses :target to change attributes of multiple elements by just one trigger.

  • 1
    This is an example of styling two elements based on a single state change. The question is asking how to mark up a UI such that a single user action causes two separate state changes at once (though whether or not that is a sensible approach to the problem is debatable in its own right). – BoltClock Jul 30 '18 at 16:40
  • @BoltClock is right... probably in both: this is not what I'm looking for, and what I'm trying is probably not the best way of doing things (I fear I got into an XY problem, that's why I'm open to different approaches) – Alvaro Montoro Jul 30 '18 at 17:09
  • 1
    @Alvaro Montoro: Arguably, writing a game in HTML and CSS alone itself is the XY problem ;) – BoltClock Jul 30 '18 at 17:10
  • 1
    It's an interesting challenge though, and curiousity has often led to great innovation. I'm sorry I can't be of a help here. – confetti Jul 30 '18 at 17:11
-1

Your :invalid attempt doesn't work because a required parameter in a radio button will validate if any of the buttons in the group (any that share the same name) is selected

As an alternative, you could use :not selector with :checked instead

#radio1:not(:checked) + #radio2:checked ~ div

div {
  color: purple;
}

#radio1:checked ~ div {
  color: blue;
}

#radio2:checked ~ div {
  color: fuchsia;
}

#radio1:not(:checked) ~ div {
  color: red;
}

#radio1:not(:checked) + #radio2:checked ~ div {
  color: green;
}
<input type="radio" name="radio1" id="radio1" required />
<input type="radio" name="radio1" id="radio2" />

<div>Text to be green if radio2 is checked</div>

Maybe this is enough to make your game work :)

  • he asked "Is there any way to trigger two "state changes" by clicking on just one <label> or <a>?" – user10145552 Jul 31 '18 at 0:09
  • @AhmadSalameh no, that's just the title. The real question is how to make this work. And if he thinks his :invalid approach would set him any closer to that, then the :not(:checked) alternative I proposed will do the trick. - - Going around downvoting everyone else's answer doesn't do you any favour, pretty much au contraire. – Facundo Corradini Jul 31 '18 at 15:20
  • I will check this, but it looks like .radio1:not(:checked) is always true when .radio2:checked. So truly .radio2:checked ~ div and .radio1:not(:checked) + radio2:checked ~ div are two rules for the same state (the second one being applied as it is more specific). – Alvaro Montoro Jul 31 '18 at 15:46
  • @FacundoCorradini I didn't downvoted your answer and just to let you know it's not about reputation but about helping. – user10145552 Jul 31 '18 at 16:15
  • @AlvaroMontoro that's true, as long as radio2 is inmediately after radio1. But wouldn't your :invalid approach (if it worked) be the same as well? I thought you might be checking for adjacent siblings, o maybe even trying to beat specificity issues. – Facundo Corradini Jul 31 '18 at 20:46

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