15

So lets say I have a DataFrame in pandas with a m rows and n columns. Let's also say that I wanted to reverse the order of the columns, which can be done with the following code:

df_reversed = df[df.columns[::-1]]

What is the Big O complexity of this operation? I'm assuming this would depend on the number of columns, but would it also depend on the number of rows?

5
  • 5
    Note to self: go for the lowest orders of magnitude when setting up such tests :) crashed the laptop.
    – roganjosh
    Jul 23, 2018 at 19:45
  • 1
    If you are going for performance, go with slicing df.iloc[:,::-1], which returns a view and hence should be virtually free as opposed to df[df.columns[::-1]] that creates a copy as you are indexing in the latter one.
    – Divakar
    Jul 30, 2018 at 13:11
  • 2
    @Divakar, As a general rule, is this true of only iloc, or does loc also return views? Probably beyond the scope of a single comment, but I'm also interested in why direct indexing via df[col_list] should return a copy (is it a design choice / side-effect / is there any benefit?).
    – jpp
    Jul 30, 2018 at 15:11
  • @divakar if I return a view, can I still do operations on this and then once again reverse the order of the columns and end up with the original dataframe with the operations applied? Aug 3, 2018 at 21:32
  • 1
    @TimHoldsworth Once you do operations, you create a copy.
    – Divakar
    Aug 3, 2018 at 21:43

3 Answers 3

7

I don't know how Pandas implements this, but I did test it empirically. I ran the following code (in a Jupyter notebook) to test the speed of the operation:

def get_dummy_df(n):
    return pd.DataFrame({'a': [1,2]*n, 'b': [4,5]*n, 'c': [7,8]*n})

df = get_dummy_df(100)
print df.shape
%timeit df_r = df[df.columns[::-1]]

df = get_dummy_df(1000)
print df.shape
%timeit df_r = df[df.columns[::-1]]

df = get_dummy_df(10000)
print df.shape
%timeit df_r = df[df.columns[::-1]]

df = get_dummy_df(100000)
print df.shape
%timeit df_r = df[df.columns[::-1]]

df = get_dummy_df(1000000)
print df.shape
%timeit df_r = df[df.columns[::-1]]

df = get_dummy_df(10000000)
print df.shape
%timeit df_r = df[df.columns[::-1]]

The output was:

(200, 3)
1000 loops, best of 3: 419 µs per loop
(2000, 3)
1000 loops, best of 3: 425 µs per loop
(20000, 3)
1000 loops, best of 3: 498 µs per loop
(200000, 3)
100 loops, best of 3: 2.66 ms per loop
(2000000, 3)
10 loops, best of 3: 25.2 ms per loop
(20000000, 3)
1 loop, best of 3: 207 ms per loop

As you can see, in the first 3 cases, the overhead of the operation is what takes most of the time (400-500µs), but from the 4th case, the time it takes starts to be proportional to the amount of data, increasing in an order of magnitude each time.

So, assuming there must also be a proportion to n, it seems that we are dealing with O(m*n)

4
+50

The Big O complexity (as of Pandas 0.24) is m*n where m is the number of columns and n is the number of rows. Note, this is when using the DataFrame.__getitem__ method (aka []) with an Index (see relevant code, with other types that would trigger a copy).

Here is a helpful stack trace:

 <ipython-input-4-3162cae03863>(2)<module>()
      1 columns = df.columns[::-1]
----> 2 df_reversed = df[columns]

  pandas/core/frame.py(2682)__getitem__()
   2681             # either boolean or fancy integer index
-> 2682             return self._getitem_array(key)
   2683         elif isinstance(key, DataFrame):

  pandas/core/frame.py(2727)_getitem_array()
   2726             indexer = self.loc._convert_to_indexer(key, axis=1)
-> 2727             return self._take(indexer, axis=1)
   2728 

  pandas/core/generic.py(2789)_take()
   2788                                    axis=self._get_block_manager_axis(axis),
-> 2789                                    verify=True)
   2790         result = self._constructor(new_data).__finalize__(self)

  pandas/core/internals.py(4539)take()
   4538         return self.reindex_indexer(new_axis=new_labels, indexer=indexer,
-> 4539                                     axis=axis, allow_dups=True)
   4540 

  pandas/core/internals.py(4421)reindex_indexer()
   4420             new_blocks = self._slice_take_blocks_ax0(indexer,
-> 4421                                                      fill_tuple=(fill_value,))
   4422         else:

  pandas/core/internals.py(1254)take_nd()
   1253             new_values = algos.take_nd(values, indexer, axis=axis,
-> 1254                                        allow_fill=False)
   1255         else:

> pandas/core/algorithms.py(1658)take_nd()
   1657     import ipdb; ipdb.set_trace()
-> 1658     func = _get_take_nd_function(arr.ndim, arr.dtype, out.dtype, axis=axis,
   1659                                  mask_info=mask_info)
   1660     func(arr, indexer, out, fill_value)

The func call on L1660 in pandas/core/algorithms ultimately calls a cython function with O(m * n) complexity. This is where data from the the original data is copied into out. out contains a copy of the original data in reversed order.

    inner_take_2d_axis0_template = """\
    cdef:
        Py_ssize_t i, j, k, n, idx
        %(c_type_out)s fv

    n = len(indexer)
    k = values.shape[1]

    fv = fill_value

    IF %(can_copy)s:
        cdef:
            %(c_type_out)s *v
            %(c_type_out)s *o

        #GH3130
        if (values.strides[1] == out.strides[1] and
            values.strides[1] == sizeof(%(c_type_out)s) and
            sizeof(%(c_type_out)s) * n >= 256):

            for i from 0 <= i < n:
                idx = indexer[i]
                if idx == -1:
                    for j from 0 <= j < k:
                        out[i, j] = fv
                else:
                    v = &values[idx, 0]
                    o = &out[i, 0]
                    memmove(o, v, <size_t>(sizeof(%(c_type_out)s) * k))
            return

    for i from 0 <= i < n:
        idx = indexer[i]
        if idx == -1:
            for j from 0 <= j < k:
                out[i, j] = fv
        else:
            for j from 0 <= j < k:
                out[i, j] = %(preval)svalues[idx, j]%(postval)s
"""

Note that in the above template function, there is a path that uses memmove (which is the path taken in this case because we are mapping from int64 to int64 and the dimension of the output is identical as we are just switching the indexes). Note that memmove is still O(n), being proportional to the number of bytes it has to copy, although likely faster than writing to the indexes directly.

2
  • 1
    I went ahead and added some more examples which show more context into the path taken after calling __getitem__ and the cython function called, which ultimately is where most of the time is spent for large values. The logic in __getitem__ is not always intuitive, but I found this GH issue to be helpful for explaining what different inputs do under the hood github.com/pandas-dev/pandas/issues/9595.
    – akosel
    Aug 6, 2018 at 14:22
  • Thank you, this goes a long way to explaining the behaviour we see.
    – jpp
    Aug 7, 2018 at 9:48
-1

I ran an empirical test using big_O fitting library here

Note: All tests have been conducted on independent variable sweeping 6 orders of magnitude (i.e.

  • rows from 10 to 10^6 vs. constant column size of 3,
  • columns from 10 to 10^6 vs. constant row size of 10

The result shows that the columns reverse operation .columns[::-1] complexity in the DataFrame is

  1. Cubical: O(n^3) where n is the number of rows
  2. Cubical: O(n^3) where n is the number of columns

Prerequisites: You will need to install big_o() using terminal command pip install big_o

Code

import big_o
import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

SWEAP_LOG10 = 6
COLUMNS = 3
ROWS = 10

def build_df(rows, columns):
    # To isolated the creation of the DataFrame from the inversion operation.
    narray = np.zeros(rows*columns).reshape(rows, columns)
    df = pd.DataFrame(narray)
    return df

def flip_columns(df):
    return df[df.columns[::-1]]

def get_row_df(n, m=COLUMNS):
    return build_df(1*10**n, m)

def get_column_df(n, m=ROWS):
    return build_df(m, 1*10**n)


# infer the big_o on columns[::-1] operation vs. rows
best, others = big_o.big_o(flip_columns, get_row_df, min_n=1, max_n=SWEAP_LOG10,n_measures=SWEAP_LOG10, n_repeats=10)

# print results
print('Measuring .columns[::-1] complexity against rapid increase in # rows')
print('-'*80 + '\nBig O() fits: {}\n'.format(best) + '-'*80)

for class_, residual in others.items():
    print('{:<60s}  (res: {:.2G})'.format(str(class_), residual))

print('-'*80)

# infer the big_o on columns[::-1] operation vs. columns
best, others = big_o.big_o(flip_columns, get_column_df, min_n=1, max_n=SWEAP_LOG10,n_measures=SWEAP_LOG10, n_repeats=10)

# print results
print()
print('Measuring .columns[::-1] complexity against rapid increase in # columns')
print('-'*80 + '\nBig O() fits: {}\n'.format(best) + '-'*80)

for class_, residual in others.items():
    print('{:<60s}  (res: {:.2G})'.format(str(class_), residual))
    
print('-'*80)

Results

Measuring .columns[::-1] complexity against rapid increase in # rows
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Big O() fits: Cubic: time = -0.017 + 0.00067*n^3
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Constant: time = 0.032                                        (res: 0.021)
Linear: time = -0.051 + 0.024*n                               (res: 0.011)
Quadratic: time = -0.026 + 0.0038*n^2                         (res: 0.0077)
Cubic: time = -0.017 + 0.00067*n^3                            (res: 0.0052)
Polynomial: time = -6.3 * x^1.5                               (res: 6)
Logarithmic: time = -0.026 + 0.053*log(n)                     (res: 0.015)
Linearithmic: time = -0.024 + 0.012*n*log(n)                  (res: 0.0094)
Exponential: time = -7 * 0.66^n                               (res: 3.6)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Measuring .columns[::-1] complexity against rapid increase in # columns
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Big O() fits: Cubic: time = -0.28 + 0.009*n^3
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Constant: time = 0.38                                         (res: 3.9)
Linear: time = -0.73 + 0.32*n                                 (res: 2.1)
Quadratic: time = -0.4 + 0.052*n^2                            (res: 1.5)
Cubic: time = -0.28 + 0.009*n^3                               (res: 1.1)
Polynomial: time = -6 * x^2.2                                 (res: 16)
Logarithmic: time = -0.39 + 0.71*log(n)                       (res: 2.8)
Linearithmic: time = -0.38 + 0.16*n*log(n)                    (res: 1.8)
Exponential: time = -7 * 1^n                                  (res: 9.7)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
7
  • You're neglecting overhead at small orders of magnitude Aug 4, 2018 at 19:12
  • And yes, technically if it's O(n), O(n^3) applies too, but it's not very useful. Aug 4, 2018 at 19:13
  • @MadPhysicist can you elaborate on overhead on small orders of magnitude
    – helcode
    Aug 4, 2018 at 19:15
  • 2
    The other answer does a great job of that. Aug 4, 2018 at 19:17
  • 1
    Your just doing a fit to a limited number of points, and the low tail is throwing you off. The other answer is actually looking at the big O. I seriously doubt that any basic operation in pandas is O(n^3) Aug 4, 2018 at 19:20

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