2

I have a class method declaration with three parameters:

declare class Application {
    PrintOut(OutputFileName?: string, PrintToFile?: boolean, StartPage?: number): void;
}

When printing to a file, the output file name must be passed; when not printing to a file, the filename cannot be passed. This means that the OutputFileName parameter's type depends on the PrintToFile parameter, as follows:

  • If PrintToFile is true, then OutputFileName is of type string and not undefined -- i.e. not optional.
  • Otherwise (PrintToFile is false / undefined, or not passed), then OutputFileName must be undefined

Or, using overloads:

declare class Application {
    PrintOut(OutputFileName: string, PrintToFile: true, StartPage?: number): void;
    PrintOut(OutputFileName?: undefined, PrintToFile?: false, StartPage?: number): void;
}

the following calls are valid:

x.PrintOut('abcd', true);
x.PrintOut(undefined, false);
x.PrintOut(undefined, undefined);
x.PrintOut();

and the following calls are invalid:

x.PrintOut(undefined, true);     // first parameter must be a string
x.PrintOut('abcd', false);       // cannot pass a filename if not printing to a file
x.PrintOut('abcd', undefined);  // (same as above)
x.PrintOut('abcd');             // (same as above)

Playground1

How can I duplicate the functionality of the above overloads using conditional types?

If there were only the two parameters, I would stick with overloads. But this is just an MCVE. The actual method has 19 parameters, with multiple parameters depending on specific values of each of 3 different parameters; and similar methods are applied to 5 different object types.


Using this:

type IfPrintToFile<T, U> =
    T extends true ? U :
    undefined;

declare class Application {
    PrintOut<T extends boolean>(OutputFileName?: IfPrintToFile<T, string>, PrintToFile?: T, StartPage?: number): void;
}

doesn't prevent these:

x.PrintOut(undefined, true);
x.PrintOut('abcd', undefined);
x.PrintOut('abcd');

Playground1

while defining the constraint on the method as T extends boolean | undefined still doesn't block these:

x.PrintOut(undefined, true);
x.PrintOut('abcd');

Playground1


Defining the parameters as required:

type IfPrintToFile<T, U> =
    T extends true ? U :
    undefined;

declare class Application {
    PrintOut<T extends boolean | undefined>(OutputFileName: IfPrintToFile<T, string>, PrintToFile: T, StartPage?: number): void;
}

blocks all the invalid calls, but also blocks the following valid call:

x.PrintOut();

Playground1


1. It seems the Options settings are not stored in the Playground URL, and need to be set manually each time.

1
  • Just throwing this out there if the last version only has the problem of not allowing PrintOut() why not just define an overload for that one case. Maybe conditional types can't get you to just one signature, but they might reduce the number of overloads. – Titian Cernicova-Dragomir Jul 24 '18 at 1:48
3

You can do this nowadays using a rest parameter (things seem to have improved since jcalz's answer in 2018!):

declare class Application {
    PrintOut<T extends boolean | undefined>(
        ...args: T extends true ? [
            OutputFileName: string,
            PrintToFile: T,
            StartPage?: number,
        ] : [
            OutputFileName?: undefined,
            PrintToFile?: T,
            StartPage?: number,
        ]
    ): void;
}

const x = new Application();

// valid calls
x.PrintOut('abcd', true);
x.PrintOut(undefined, false);
x.PrintOut(undefined, undefined);
x.PrintOut();

// invalid calls
x.PrintOut(undefined, true);
x.PrintOut('abcd', false);
x.PrintOut('abcd', undefined);
x.PrintOut('abcd');

This produces exactly the expected errors and allows all the valid forms. See playground.

1

I think this probably can't be done.


Optional function arguments (and object properties) can't be turned on or off programmatically inside the types of the function arguments (or object properties), as far as I know. That is, there's no way to create an Optional<> type alias that makes these equivalent

type FuncA = (x?: string) => void;
type FuncB = (x: Optional<string>) => void;

or these equivalent

type ObjA = {x?: string};
type ObjB = {x: Optional<string>};

There is an open issue about this but I don't think there's been any progress there. So what you're trying to do is probably stymied right there.


It is true that starting in TS3.0, you will be able to use tuple types in rest/spread positions, and that there will be a way to get some handle on optional arguments:

Optional elements in tuple types

Tuple types now permit a ? postfix on element types to indicate that the element is optional:

let t: [number, string?, boolean?];
t = [42, "hello", true];
t = [42, "hello"];
t = [42];

A tuple type permits an element to be omitted if it has a postfix ? modifier on its type and all elements to the right of it also have ? modifiers.

When tuple types are inferred for rest parameters, optional parameters in the source become optional tuple elements in the inferred type.

And so you might be tempted to use this to create a union of possible argument tuples, like this:

type PrintOutParams = [string, true, number?] | [undefined?, false?, number?]

But you won't be able to use that in a rest parameter:

PrintOut(...args: PrintOutParams): void;
// error:  A rest parameter must be of an array type.

because a union of array types is not considered to be an array type itself when type checking rest parameters. At least as of 2015, this issue was considered "by design", and the reason it isn't needed is... well, see for yourself:

We perhaps could change the rule from "a rest parameter must be an array type" to "a rest parameter must be an array type or a union type in which all constituents are array types" but that seems not worth adding complexity for, since it's easy enough to add overloads to clarify the intended behavior.

And it's true... overloads do give you the behavior you want. Have you thought about using overloads?

Oh, right.


Sorry I don't have better news. Hope that helps anyway; good luck!

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