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For quite a lot of time I struggled with finding a working solution to connect an android device and an UWP application (on PC) with either an IP connection or bluetooth. The main issue is to find a set of code or example which is simple enough to get into but is guaranteed to work (so that my efforts are not futile, which was the case for more than a week now).

What is clear is that there is no possibility for a "code pair" (as of client-server), as the libraries used and the way the code structures are built must be vastly different. A further problem is that bluetooth does not seem to allow loopback connections, which causes even more issues with testing. Another issue is possibly outdated example projects. Also it's hard to find xamarin/c# solutions, and I didn't want to get into Android Studio and Java (my project is the UWP one, the android part is just for testing). These are simply too many layers of difficulties to get into for me.

The goal for now (and thus also my question asking for help) is a basic operation:

  • Send a plain message or datastream from Xamarin-Android (as client) to UWP (as server) and have a response for receiving it - via bluetooth.

Let's ignore device searching now (if possible), let's just use IP/MAC address directly. From there on everything should fall into place. All necessary capabilities/declarations are set and devices are paired.

I would be really grateful for any help.

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  • 1
    Have you checked this official sample? – CoCaIceDew Jul 25 '18 at 9:11
  • Yes I have, quite a while back. As I don't have two viable devices for that, I dismissed it. Now that I have finally made progress and that I am close to the solution, this may be exactly what I need now (as of just using the code without being able to test the example solution itself). – Battle Jul 25 '18 at 9:17
  • Alright, I got it finally working. It was quite tricky given that the UWP part had some weird behaviors I had to circumvent, but I will try to give an answer about it and the code involved once I am finished. – Battle Jul 26 '18 at 6:50
  • I will do it Monday when I am at work again. It's a hassle to do it from home. – Battle Jul 28 '18 at 14:35
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I found out the solution myself, so here is how it went:

First of all, remember to define all necessary declarations and capabilities for bluetooth. This will explicitly focus on the code part.

For the Xamarin/Android client part. The website which was really helpful is this one. Also try out the quite well known chat sample for Xamarin. CreateMessage is a method to create debug messages on the local device which can be displayed. I kept it very simple, because my project is primarily about the UWP part. All of this was enclosed in a try { } catch { } clause, but I leave it out now due to having even more indentations and brackets.

using Java.Util;
using System.Text;
using System.IO;
using Android.Runtime;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

TestClass
{
    // The UUIDs will be displayed down below if not known.
    const string TARGET_UUID = "00001105-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb";
    BluetoothSocket socket = null;
    OutputStreamInvoker outStream = null;
    InputStreamInvoker inStream = null;

    void Connect ()
    {
        BluetoothAdapter adapter = BluetoothAdapter.DefaultAdapter;
        if (adapter == null) CreateMessage ("No Bluetooth adapter found.");
        else if (!adapter.IsEnabled) CreateMessage ("Bluetooth adapter is not enabled.");

        List<BluetoothDevice> L = new List<BluetoothDevice> ();
        foreach (BluetoothDevice d in adapter.BondedDevices)
        {
            CreateMessage ("D: " + d.Name + " " + d.Address + " " + d.BondState.ToString ());
            L.Add (d);
        }

        BluetoothDevice device = null;
        device = L.Find (j => j.Name == "PC-NAME");

        if (device == null) CreateMessage ("Named device not found.");
        else
        {
            CreateMessage ("Device has been found: " + device.Name + " " + device.Address + " " + device.BondState.ToString ());
        }

        socket = device.CreateRfcommSocketToServiceRecord (UUID.FromString (TARGET_UUID));
        await socket.ConnectAsync ();

        if (socket != null && socket.IsConnected) CreateMessage ("Connection successful!");
        else CreateMessage ("Connection failed!");

        inStream = (InputStreamInvoker) socket.InputStream;
        outStream = (OutputStreamInvoker) socket.OutputStream;

        if (socket != null && socket.IsConnected)
        {
            Task t = new Task (() => Listen (inStream));
            t.Start ();
        }
        else throw new Exception ("Socket not existing or not connected.");
    }
}

Now we enter the part with the bytes and pain. I used this format to transmit messages: [4 bytes of uint for message length] [1 byte per character]. What is important is that you use the same byte to uint conversion, because the order of bytes or how it went in general had differences in the UWP specific methods. If your word length is not what it is supposed to be (instead of ~23 something like 3000000+), that is a problem. Reading bytes which do not exist (yet) can mean exceptions or even merciless crashes despite using try { } catch { } clauses.

The following method sends the message in the format mentioned above. As said, it is among the most simple ways to do this, so I won't mention how things can be done better.

private async void SendMessage (string message)
{
    uint messageLength = (uint) message.Length;
    byte[] countBuffer = BitConverter.GetBytes (messageLength);
    byte[] buffer = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes (message);

    await outStream.WriteAsync (countBuffer, 0, countBuffer.Length);
    await outStream.WriteAsync (buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
}

Usage: Run method 1, and then method 2. You can also do a SendMessage within method 1 at the end (when it is already connected).

Now to the part about listening for messages/responses. In the first method you will see this one was run via a Task, so that it does not block the method it is started it. Maybe there are Xamarin/Android specific ways to solve that, but it does not matter to me, so I simply circumvented that.

private async void Listen (Stream inStream)
{
    bool Listening = true;
    CreateMessage ("Listening has been started.");
    byte[] uintBuffer = new byte[sizeof (uint)]; // This reads the first 4 bytes which form an uint that indicates the length of the string message.
    byte[] textBuffer; // This will contain the string message.

    // Keep listening to the InputStream while connected.
    while (Listening)
    {
        try
        {
            // This one blocks until it gets 4 bytes.
            await inStream.ReadAsync (uintBuffer, 0, uintBuffer.Length);
            uint readLength = BitConverter.ToUInt32 (uintBuffer, 0);

            textBuffer = new byte[readLength];
            // Here we know for how many bytes we are looking for.
            await inStream.ReadAsync (textBuffer, 0, (int) readLength);

            string s = Encoding.UTF8.GetString (textBuffer);
            CreateMessage ("Received: " + s);
        }
        catch (Java.IO.IOException e)
        {
            CreateMessage ("Error: " + e.Message);
            Listening = false;
            break;
        }
    }
    CreateMessage ("Listening has ended.");
}

This was only half the work. For the UWP server part, I will simply post my current code, which is way more clean and requires no editing for this.

using System;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using Windows.Devices.Bluetooth.Rfcomm;
using Windows.Networking.Sockets;
using Windows.Storage.Streams;

namespace BT
{
    public sealed class BluetoothConnectionHandler
    {
        RfcommServiceProvider provider;
        bool isAdvertising = false;
        StreamSocket socket;
        StreamSocketListener socketListener;
        DataWriter writer;
        DataReader reader;
        Task listeningTask;

        public bool Listening { get; private set; }
        // I use Actions for transmitting the output and debug output. These are custom classes I created to pack them more conveniently and to be able to just "Trigger" them without checking anything. Replace this with regular Actions and use their invoke methods.
        public ActionSingle<string> MessageOutput { get; private set; } = new ActionSingle<string> ();
        public ActionSingle<string> LogOutput { get; private set; } = new ActionSingle<string> ();

        // These were in the samples.
        const uint SERVICE_VERSION_ATTRIBUTE_ID = 0x0300;
        const byte SERVICE_VERSION_ATTRIBUTE_TYPE = 0x0a; // UINT32
        const uint SERVICE_VERSION = 200;

        const bool DO_RESPONSE = true;

        public async void StartServer ()
        {
            // Initialize the provider for the hosted RFCOMM service.
            provider = await RfcommServiceProvider.CreateAsync (RfcommServiceId.ObexObjectPush);

            // Create a listener for this service and start listening.
            socketListener = new StreamSocketListener ();
            socketListener.ConnectionReceived += OnConnectionReceived;
            await socketListener.BindServiceNameAsync (provider.ServiceId.AsString (), SocketProtectionLevel.BluetoothEncryptionAllowNullAuthentication);

            // Set the SDP attributes and start advertising.
            InitializeServiceSdpAttributes (provider);
            provider.StartAdvertising (socketListener);
            isAdvertising = true;
        }

        public void Disconnect ()
        {
            Listening = false;
            if (provider != null) { if (isAdvertising) provider.StopAdvertising (); provider = null; } // StopAdvertising relentlessly causes a crash if not advertising.
            if (socketListener != null) { socketListener.Dispose (); socketListener = null; }
            if (writer != null) { writer.DetachStream (); writer.Dispose (); writer = null; }
            if (reader != null) { reader.DetachStream (); reader.Dispose (); reader = null; }
            if (socket != null) { socket.Dispose (); socket = null; }
            if (listeningTask != null) { listeningTask = null; }
        }

        public async void SendMessage (string message)
        {
            // There's no need to send a zero length message.
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty (message)) return;

            // Make sure that the connection is still up and there is a message to send.
            if (socket == null || writer == null) { LogOutput.Trigger ("Cannot send message: No clients connected."); return; } // "No clients connected, please wait for a client to connect before attempting to send a message."

            uint messageLength = (uint) message.Length;
            byte[] countBuffer = BitConverter.GetBytes (messageLength);
            byte[] buffer = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes (message);

            LogOutput.Trigger ("Sending: " + message);

            writer.WriteBytes (countBuffer);
            writer.WriteBytes (buffer);

            await writer.StoreAsync ();
        }



        private void InitializeServiceSdpAttributes (RfcommServiceProvider provider)
        {
            DataWriter w = new DataWriter ();

            // First write the attribute type.
            w.WriteByte (SERVICE_VERSION_ATTRIBUTE_TYPE);

            // Then write the data.
            w.WriteUInt32 (SERVICE_VERSION);

            IBuffer data = w.DetachBuffer ();
            provider.SdpRawAttributes.Add (SERVICE_VERSION_ATTRIBUTE_ID, data);
        }

        private void OnConnectionReceived (StreamSocketListener listener, StreamSocketListenerConnectionReceivedEventArgs args)
        {
            provider.StopAdvertising ();
            isAdvertising = false;
            provider = null;
            listener.Dispose ();
            socket = args.Socket;
            writer = new DataWriter (socket.OutputStream);
            reader = new DataReader (socket.InputStream);
            writer.UnicodeEncoding = Windows.Storage.Streams.UnicodeEncoding.Utf8;
            reader.UnicodeEncoding = Windows.Storage.Streams.UnicodeEncoding.Utf8;
            //StartListening ();
            LogOutput.Trigger ("Connection established.");
            listeningTask = new Task (() => StartListening ());
            listeningTask.Start ();
            // Notify connection received.
        }

        private async void StartListening ()
        {
            LogOutput.Trigger ("Starting to listen for input.");
            Listening = true;
            while (Listening)
            {
                try
                {
                    // Based on the protocol we've defined, the first uint is the size of the message. [UInt (4)] + [Message (1*n)] - The UInt describes the length of the message.
                    uint readLength = await reader.LoadAsync (sizeof (uint));

                    // Check if the size of the data is expected (otherwise the remote has already terminated the connection).
                    if (!Listening) break;
                    if (readLength < sizeof (uint))
                    {
                        Listening = false;
                        Disconnect ();
                        LogOutput.Trigger ("The connection has been terminated.");
                        break;
                    }

                    uint messageLength = reader.RReadUint (); // 

                    LogOutput.Trigger ("messageLength: " + messageLength.ToString ());

                    // Load the rest of the message since you already know the length of the data expected.
                    readLength = await reader.LoadAsync (messageLength);

                    // Check if the size of the data is expected (otherwise the remote has already terminated the connection).
                    if (!Listening) break;
                    if (readLength < messageLength)
                    {
                        Listening = false;
                        Disconnect ();
                        LogOutput.Trigger ("The connection has been terminated.");
                        break;
                    }

                    string message = reader.ReadString (messageLength);
                    MessageOutput.Trigger ("Received message: " + message);
                    if (DO_RESPONSE) SendMessage ("abcdefghij");
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    // If this is an unknown status it means that the error is fatal and retry will likely fail.
                    if (SocketError.GetStatus (e.HResult) == SocketErrorStatus.Unknown)
                    {
                        Listening = false;
                        Disconnect ();
                        LogOutput.Trigger ("Fatal unknown error occurred.");
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
            LogOutput.Trigger ("Stopped to listen for input.");
        }
    }
}

Usage is the following:

  1. Create an instance of BluetoothConnectionHandler.
  2. Set up the MessageOutput and/or LogOutput (read the comment in the code regarding this).
  3. Run its StartServer method.
  4. To send a message, use its SendMessage method.

The extension method for the RReadUint:

public static uint RReadUint (this DataReader reader)
{
    uint a = 0;
    byte[] x = new byte[sizeof (uint)];
    reader.ReadBytes (x);
    a = BitConverter.ToUInt32 (x, 0);
    return a;
}

This should contain everything needed to do what I asked for... in hintsight I see there was no simple answer possible. From here on everything can get improved, as it is meant as the possibly most basic way to have bluetooth communication between UWP and Xamarin/Android.

In case you have questions about this, feel free to ask in the comment sections.

1
  • 1
    Thank you for this, thats right what I needed. I've just used the xamarin part since I got a rpi bluetooth server with python. Simple remark, I had to put the TARGET_UUID in all caps for it to work. TARGET_UUID = "00001101-0000-1000-8000-00805F9B34FB" Ty again. – Max_Thom Aug 12 '20 at 22:21

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