2

I have a jQuery plugin (which I don't want to modify) that is dynamically creating a div. Aside from that, I have a webcomponent scrollable-div, which is a customized built-in extended from HTMLDivElement. As I have no control over how that div is created by the jQuery plugin, I need to upgrade it after creation and after it has already been added to the DOM.

class myDiv extends HTMLDivElement {
  constructor(...args) {
    const self = super(...args);
    self.addEventListener('click', (e) => {
      e.target.textContent = 'clicked'
    })
    return self;
  }
}

customElements.define('my-div', myDiv, { extends: 'div' });

document.addEventListener('DOMContentLoaded', () => { 
  // this is where I'm trying to turn the div#upgradeMe into a my-div
  upgradeMe.setAttribute('is', 'my-div');
});
<div id="upgradeMe">Click me</div>

Simply adding the is="my-div" attribute obviously does not do the trick, the div simply stays a regular HTMLDivElement. How can I programmatically upgrade a native element that is already in the DOM to a customized built-in web component?

2
  • Have you tried creating new my-div element, copying original one's innerHTML and attributes and replacing original div with your new element? – barbsan Jul 24 '18 at 10:10
  • That feels like a very heavy-weight process to do. I haven't checked, but I would prefer a more light-weight solution here, if such a thing exists. Replacing the div would also trigger the execution of connectedCallbacks of child components, which is unwanted. – connexo Jul 24 '18 at 12:40
2

It's not possible because the element is already created as a standard <div> element and not identified when parsed as upgradable (extendable) due to the lack of the is attribute.

If the custom element is already defined, the only possible workaround is to replace the existing by a clone (as suggested in the comments by @barbsan).

The short way:

  1. create a <template> element
  2. copy the div's outerHTML into its innerHTML property
  3. replace the orginal element with the template's content with replaceChild()

class myDiv extends HTMLDivElement {
  constructor(...args) {
    const self = super(...args);
    self.addEventListener('click', (e) => {
      e.target.textContent = 'clicked'
    })
    return self;
  }
}

customElements.define('my-div', myDiv, { extends: 'div' });

document.addEventListener('DOMContentLoaded', () => { 
  // this is where I'm trying to turn the div#upgradeMe into a my-div
  upgradeMe.setAttribute('is', 'my-div');
  var t = document.createElement( 'template' )
  t.innerHTML = upgradeMe.outerHTML
  upgradeMe.parentElement.replaceChild( t.content, upgradeMe )
});
<div id="upgradeMe">Click me</div>

Précisions

When an element is parsed, an is value is affected according to the DOM spec:

Elements have an associated namespace, namespace prefix, local name, custom element state, custom element definition, is value. When an element is created, all of these values are initialized.

Only elements with a valid is attribute are identified as customizable:

An element’s custom element state is one of "undefined", "failed", "uncustomized", or "custom". An element whose custom element state is "uncustomized" or "custom" is said to be defined. An element whose custom element state is "custom" is said to be custom.

Therefore if the element has no is attribute at parse time, it will not be customizable. That's why you cannot add the is attribute afterward.

Also in the HTML specs:

After a custom element is created, changing the value of the is attribute does not change the element's behavior, as it is saved on the element as its is value.

The is attribute is used only at element creation (at parse time) to initialize the is value and has no effect if changed when the element is already created. In that sense is value is read-only.

3
  • Can you add some reference as of that not being possible? – connexo Jul 26 '18 at 0:07
  • I've updated my answer. It's difficult to give an explicit concise reference as actually it depends on the whole element creation process, which will identify once and for all if the element is a custom element or not (and there if is upgradable or not). I hope this will help you. – Supersharp Jul 26 '18 at 9:02
  • 1
    Thank you for the effort! – connexo Jul 26 '18 at 9:35
0

If you want to support all modern browser's you can't customize built in components, Apple said they will never support is="" https://github.com/w3c/webcomponents/issues/509#issuecomment-222860736

1
  • 80% of our web components are form input controls with custom behaviour, which we still need to participate in form submits and whose native API we're using. Autonomous custom elements are a pain in the ass in that regard, as you will have to re-implement all the wanted behaviour from native input elements. Aside from that, there's the document-register-element polyfill which make the code work in any Safari/Webkit/"We don't implement is=""-Browsers. Also, this is not an answer, but a comment. – connexo Jul 24 '18 at 14:43

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