4

I'd like to smooth a scatter plot shown below (the points are very dense), and the data is here.

enter image description here

There is large noise in the middle of the curve, and I'd like to smooth the curve, also the y value should monotonically increase.

Since there are lots of curves like this, it is kind of hard to know where the noise is in the curve.

I tried scipy.signal.savgol_filter, but it didn't work.

The code I used is:

from scipy.signal import savgol_filter
from scipy import interpolate
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

s = np.loadtxt('data.csv', delimiter=',')
x = s[:, 0]
y = s[:, 1]
yhat = savgol_filter(y, 551, 3)

plt.plot(x, y, 'r')
plt.plot(x, yhat, 'b')
plt.show()

Suggestions are really appreciated. Thanks!

-------------------update-------------------------

Following Colin's method, I get the results I want. Here is the code:

from scipy.signal import savgol_filter
from scipy import interpolate
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

s = np.loadtxt('data.csv', delimiter=',')
x = s[:, 0]
y = s[:, 1]
yhat = savgol_filter(y, 551, 3)

tolerance = 0.2
increased_span = 150
filter_size = 11

first_pass = medfilt(y,filter_size)
diff = (y-first_pass)**2
first = np.argmax(diff>tolerance) - increased_span
last = len(y) - np.argmax(diff[::-1]>tolerance) + increased_span
print (first, last)
#interpolate between increased span
yhat[first:last] = np.interp(x[first:last], [x[first], x[last]],  [y[first], y[last]])


f = interpolate.interp1d(x, yhat, kind='slinear')
x_inter = np.linspace(x[0], x[-1], 1000)
y_inter = f(x_inter)
y_inter = savgol_filter(y_inter, 41, 3)

plt.plot(x, y, 'r')
plt.plot(x, yhat, 'b')
plt.show()
  • You might be better off to mask that part of the data and use a spline interpolation (also part of scipy) to fill the gap. – Daniel Lenz Jul 24 '18 at 22:13
  • @DanielLenz There are many curves like this, and the noise can occur in any part of the curve. So it's kind of hard to mask the noise part. – Tom Jul 24 '18 at 22:18
  • 1
    I'm getting some decent results with the median filter. Nonetheless, the data is clearly incorrect in these regions and you should mask and interpolate, not filter. I'd recommend you attempt to automatically find these defective regions (i.e. compute a running rms) and then extrapolate over that. – Daniel Lenz Jul 24 '18 at 22:31
6

If we firstly isolate the trouble area there are many ways to remove it. Here is an example:

tolerance = 0.2
increased_span = 150
filter_size = 11

#find noise
first_pass = medfilt(y,filter_size)
diff = (yhat-first_pass)**2
first = np.argmax(diff>tolerance) - increased_span
last = len(y) - np.argmax(diff[::-1]>tolerance) + increased_span

#interpolate between increased span
yhat[first:last] = np.interp(x[first:last], [x[first], x[last]],  [y[first], y[last]])

enter image description here

  • where do the parameters come from? I have a forecast that sometimes, particularly when it is not doing so good really, produces a line that is a lot noisier than the observed trendline. it would be great to be able to automate the correction – roberto tomás Mar 15 at 14:15

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