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I'm using load-tests to analyze the "ball park" performance of Dapper accessing SQL Server. My laptop is simultaneously the load-generator and the test target. My laptop has 2 cores, 16GB RAM, and is running Windows 10 Pro, v1709. The database is SQL Server 2017 running in a Docker container (the container's Hyper-V VM has 3GB RAM). My load-test and test code is using .net 4.6.1.

My load-test results after 15 seconds of a simulated 10 simultaneous clients are as follows:

  • Synchronous Dapper code: 750+ transactions per second.
  • Asynchronous Dapper code: 4 to 8 transactions per second. YIKES!

I realize that async can sometimes be slower than synchronous code. I also realize that my test setup is weak. However, I shouldn't be seeing such horrible performance from asynchronous code.

I've narrowed the problem to something associated with Dapper and the System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection. I need help to finally solve this. Profiler results are below.

I figured out a cheesy way to force my async code to achieve 650+ transactions per second, which I'll discuss in a bit, but now first it is time to show my code which is just a console app. I have a test class:

public class FitTest
{
    private List<ItemRequest> items;
    public FitTest()
    {
        //Parameters used for the Dapper call to the stored procedure.
        items = new List<ItemRequest> {
            new ItemRequest { SKU = "0010015488000060", ReqQty = 2 } ,
            new ItemRequest { SKU = "0010015491000060", ReqQty = 1 }
            };
    }
... //the rest not listed.

Synchronous Test Target

Within the FitTest class, under load, the following test-target method achieves 750+ transactions per second:

public Task LoadDB()
{
    var skus = items.Select(x => x.SKU);
    string procedureName = "GetWebInvBySkuList";
    string userDefinedTable = "[dbo].[StringList]";
    string connectionString = "Data Source=localhost;Initial Catalog=Web_Inventory;Integrated Security=False;User ID=sa;Password=1Secure*Password1;Connect Timeout=30;Encrypt=False;TrustServerCertificate=True;ApplicationIntent=ReadWrite;MultiSubnetFailover=False";

    var dt = new DataTable();
    dt.Columns.Add("Id", typeof(string));
    foreach (var sku in skus)
    {
        dt.Rows.Add(sku);
    }

    using (var conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
    {
        var inv = conn.Query<Inventory>(
            procedureName,
            new { skuList = dt.AsTableValuedParameter(userDefinedTable) },
            commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure);

        return Task.CompletedTask;
    }
}

I am not explicitly opening or closing the SqlConnection. I understand that Dapper does that for me. Also, the only reason the above code returns a Task is because my load-generation code is designed to work with that signature.

Asynchronous Test Target

The other test-target method in my FitTest class is this:

public async Task<IEnumerable<Inventory>> LoadDBAsync()
{
    var skus = items.Select(x => x.SKU);
    string procedureName = "GetWebInvBySkuList";
    string userDefinedTable = "[dbo].[StringList]";
    string connectionString = "Data Source=localhost;Initial Catalog=Web_Inventory;Integrated Security=False;User ID=sa;Password=1Secure*Password1;Connect Timeout=30;Encrypt=False;TrustServerCertificate=True;ApplicationIntent=ReadWrite;MultiSubnetFailover=False";

    var dt = new DataTable();
    dt.Columns.Add("Id", typeof(string));
    foreach (var sku in skus)
    {
        dt.Rows.Add(sku);
    }

    using (var conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
    {
        return await conn.QueryAsync<Inventory>(
            procedureName,
            new { skuList = dt.AsTableValuedParameter(userDefinedTable) },
            commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure).ConfigureAwait(false);
    }

}

Again, I'm not explicitly opening or closing the connection - because Dapper does that for me. I have also tested this code with explicitly opening and closing; it does not change the performance. The profiler results for the load-generator acting against the above code (4 TPS) is as follows:

async with "using" statement

What DOES change the performance is if I change the above as follows:

//using (var conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
//{
    var inv = await conn.QueryAsync<Inventory>(
        procedureName,
        new { skuList = dt.AsTableValuedParameter(userDefinedTable) },
        commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure);
    var foo = inv.ToArray();
    return inv;
//}

In this case I've converted the SqlConnection into a private member of the FitTest class and initialized it in the constructor. That is, one SqlConnection per client per load-test session. It is never disposed during the load-test. I also changed the connection string to include "MultipleActiveResultSets=True", because now I started getting those errors.

With these changes, my results become: 640+ transactions per second, and with 8 exceptions thrown. The exceptions were all "InvalidOperationException: BeginExecuteReader requires an open and available Connection. The connection's current state is connecting." The profiler results in this case:

enter image description here

That looks to me like a synchronization bug in Dapper with the SqlConnection.

Load-Generator

My load-generator, a class called Generator, is designed to be given a list of delegates when constructed. Each delegate has a unique instantiation of the FitTest class. If I supply an array of 10 delegates, it is interpreted as representing 10 clients to be used for generating load in parallel.

To kick off the load test, I have this:

//This `testFuncs` array (indirectly) points to either instances
//of the synchronous test-target, or the async test-target, depending
//on what I'm measuring.
private Func<Task>[] testFuncs;
private Dictionary<int, Task> map;
private TaskCompletionSource<bool> completionSource;

public void RunWithMultipleClients()
{
    completionSource = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();

    //Create a dictionary that has indexes and Task completion status info.
    //The indexes correspond to the testFuncs[] array (viz. the test clients).
    map = testFuncs
        .Select((f, j) => new KeyValuePair<int, Task>(j, Task.CompletedTask))
        .ToDictionary(p => p.Key, v => v.Value);

    //scenario.Duration is usually '15'. In other words, this test
    //will terminate after generating load for 15 seconds.
    Task.Delay(scenario.Duration * 1000).ContinueWith(x => {
        running = false;
        completionSource.SetResult(true);
    });

    RunWithMultipleClientsLoop();
    completionSource.Task.Wait();
}

So much for the setup, the actual load is generated as follows:

public void RunWithMultipleClientsLoop()
{
    //while (running)
    //{
        var idleList = map.Where(x => x.Value.IsCompleted).Select(k => k.Key).ToArray();
        foreach (var client in idleList)
        {
            //I've both of the following.  The `Task.Run` version
            //is about 20% faster for the synchronous test target.
            map[client] = Task.Run(testFuncs[client]); 
            //map[client] = testFuncs[client]();
        }
        Task.WhenAny(map.Values.ToArray())
            .ContinueWith(x => { if (running) RunWithMultipleClientsLoop(); });
    //    Task.WaitAny(map.Values.ToArray());
    //}
}

The while loop and Task.WaitAny, commented out, represent a different approach that has nearly the same performance; I keep it around for experiments.

One last detail. Each of the "client" delegates I pass in is first wrapped inside a metrics-capture function. The metrics capture function looks like this:

private async Task LoadLogic(Func<Task> testCode)
{
    try
    {
        if (!running)
        {
            slagCount++;
            return;
        }

        //This is where the actual test target method 
        //is called.
        await testCode().ConfigureAwait(false);

        if (running)
        {
            successCount++;
        }
        else
        {
            slagCount++;
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        if (ex.Message.Contains("Assert"))
        {
            errorCount++;
        }
        else
        {
            exceptionCount++;
        }
    }
}

When my code runs, I do not receive any errors or exceptions.

Ok, what am I doing wrong? In the worst case scenario, I would expect the async code to be only slightly slower than synchronous.

  • In the fast code, if you change CommandType.StoredProcedure); to CommandType.StoredProcedure).ToList(); what happens to the timings? – mjwills Jul 25 '18 at 1:00
  • @mjwills With ToList() added, I get 850+ transactions per second. I guess my laptop is faster today. But I tried the async again just now, and got 3 TPS. :( – Brent Arias Jul 25 '18 at 1:19
  • Profile it and see what's slow – Joe Phillips Jul 25 '18 at 3:50
  • @JoePhillips Updated question with profiling results. – Brent Arias Jul 25 '18 at 4:28
  • If I'm looking correctly, this is the QueryAsync code you're effectively running: github.com/StackExchange/Dapper/blob/… – Joe Phillips Jul 25 '18 at 4:56

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