6

Ok. very much totally noob question but I really don't have a clue and couldn't find a definitive answer:

Why there are different exception classes? For exemple: PDOException vs Exception? the way it goes through my brain: if something wrong happened in the code - exception will be thrown - right? why does it matter what type of exception?

example:

try {
     some code
}
catch(PDOException $e)
    {
    echo $e->getMessage();
    }

vs Exception class:

try {
     some code
}
catch(Exception $e)
    {
    echo $e->getMessage();
    }

Thanks:)

  • 1
    In PHP 7.4 Upgrade Notes: "Attempting to serialize a PDO or PDOStatement instance will now generate an Exception rather than a PDOException, consistent with other internal classes which do not support serialization." Here is the source. – N'Bayramberdiyev Aug 2 at 11:53
9

Because you should not treat all exception in the same way.

If you catch an exception, you could/should display an error message. But you could/should do some other things. And it will depend of the kind of exception you received.

If there is no db connection -> display message

If a query failed -> display a message and maybe do a rollback

...

Finally, you should catch all kind of exception and the last one should be Exception

try {
 some code
}
catch(PDOException $e)
{
    echo $e->getMessage();
    // Do something
}
catch(XYZException $e)
{
    echo $e->getMessage();
    // Do something different
}
catch(Exception $e)
{
echo $e->getMessage();
}
4

Different exceptions can alternatively provide additional information. Eg. in case of PDO exception, you can retrieve the PDO error info with the errorInfo member: http://www.php.net/manual/en/class.pdoexception.php#pdoexception.props.errorinfo

If you used the Exception class you would have no access to this information.

Another reason is that it's a convenient way to specifically handle different types of exceptions if you have a try/catch block around a larger block of code, which can throw more than one type of exception. For example if you had an exception describing that a connection failed, you might want to try to re-connect in the catch handler. However if you have a generic exception catch handler, you just might want to log the message; You "chain" catch handlers to handle multiple types of exceptions:

try {
    // ... code
} catch (ConnectionException $e) {
   // try to reconnect
} catch (Exception $e) {
   // log exception
}

Note. ConnectionException is just an example to demonstrate my point how you might want to use a specific exception type to do something based on that exception, it's not a standard exception.

1

Because then you can distinct beetween exceptions from different components.

try {
  do_something();
} catch (PDOException $e) {
  echo "PDO failed";
} catch (Exception $e) {
  echo "Unknown component failed";
}

Its not a good idea to make a "catch-all"-expression (except, it is really want is wanted: "catch all") and on the other hand is also not a good idea to throw a "Exception"-exception, because then you cannot distinct beetween this and any other exception anymore.

1

Because you may have to do something different depending on the type of exception :

  • If you catch a PDOException, you may want to rollback the current transaction, or log the SQL query.
  • If you have a RuntimeException while opening a file with SplFileObject, you can know the file could not be opened

Arguably exceptions are not very common in PHP right now, so catching specific exceptions is 99% of the time pointless (since you are only expecting one), but that doesn't stop you from using your own in your classes.

1

Some exceptions you may want to deal with (hens the try/catch) and others you may want to handle at a higher level in your application. Having Exceptions of a different type allows you to choose the types of exception you may need to handle dependant on the task at hand.

for example: if you send an email but it throws an exception of its own type/class you may want your application to continue but log the error, but a more generic exception may require your application to be killed entirely.

It allows you to structure your error handling.

1

Exceptions can have different logic. For instance not all exceptions should result in a fatal. Some Exception will allow you to resume after catching them.

Every class should have it's own exception handler

  1. because every class implementation differs. And so does the error / exception logic.
  2. This way you can easily track what package / class throws an exception

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