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How do I set multiple delays between bt.setText("№")?

    public void buttonOnClick (View button) {
    final Button bt = findViewById(R.id.button);
    bt.setText("3");
    //wait 1 second
    bt.setText("2");
    //wait 1 second
    bt.setText("1");
    //wait 1 second
    bt.setText("Click!");
2

Since you can't call Thread.sleep on the UI thread (only the final result would be displayed) you should do this on anhother Thread, such:

on constructor:

private Handler handler;
public void onCreate(Bundle x) {
     //super and get bt
     final Button bt = findViewById(R.id.button);
     handler = new Handler() {
           public void handleMessage(Message msg) {
                if(msg.what == 0)
                     bt.setText("Click!");
                else
                     bt.setText(String.toString(msg.what));
           }
     }
}

public void buttonOnClick (View button) {
   final Button bt = findViewById(R.id.button);
   bt.setText("3");
   //wait 1 second
   handler.sendEmptyMessageDelayed(2, 1000);
   //wait 2 second
   handler.sendEmptyMessageDelayed(1, 2000);
   //wait 3 second
   handler.sendEmptyMessageDelayed(0, 1000);
   bt.setText("Click!");
}

Note that I did used msg.what that is a identifier for such, but you could just create a message with an obj parameter that you could use later.

  • You just give complete answer. You don't want the OP to try out something. How is the OP going to learn? – olajide Jul 25 '18 at 16:08
  • 2
    That's the only way to show the Handler mechanins only ommiting the Message constructor part, I posted cause other people only would use postDelayed that uses Runnable while the Handler itself can be a host of messages. – Marcos Vasconcelos Jul 25 '18 at 17:20
  • why is msg red? i'm a complete n00b ( – Michael Romanchuk Jul 25 '18 at 17:29
  • Where?? is it red? – Marcos Vasconcelos Jul 25 '18 at 18:39
  • 1
    Handler is designed to be a host of a queue messages. Timer doesn't help (in the long way) for messaging between threads on concurrency while Handler does. – Marcos Vasconcelos Jul 26 '18 at 20:19
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Java has the Timer class that will probably do what you want. You may want to use the TimerTask class to produce a basic/empty task. Then run the task using Timer.

Baeldung Timer

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new CountDownTimer(4000, 1000){

   @Override
   public void onTick(long millisUntilFinished) {
       //change text
    }

   @Override
   public void onFinish() {

   }
}.start();
0

Try this:

Use postDelayed

 private static int SPLASH_TIME_OUT = 1000;

  if(bt.equal("3")){
        new Handler().postDelayed(new Runnable() {

                @Override
                public void run() {

                // This method will be executed once the timer is over 
                bt.setText("2");
                }
            }, SPLASH_TIME_OUT);  
       }
    ...
    //You can continue like that.
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Using RxJava you can do it in an efficient way.

Observable.interval(1L, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
         .take(2) // how many you want. if you want it infinite just delete this
         .observeOn(AndroidSchedulers.mainThread())
         .subscribeOn(Schedulers.io())
         .subscribe((l) -> {
               text.setText();//According to number
         }, (t) -> {
               //Handle Error
         });

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