31

I finally gave up and wrote a for loop to initialize a simple array of objects where each object has an incremented counter (id) as an attribute of the object. In other words, I just want:

var sampleData = [{id: 1},{id: 2},...];

I was hoping for a compact syntax I could just put on my return statement.

let sampleData = [];
for (var p = 0; p < 25; p++){
    sampleData.push({id: p});
}

return {
    data: sampleData,
    isLoading: true
};
1
51

Array.from() is a nice way to do this. You can pass a {length: somlength} object or some other array-like object and a function that defines each item. The first argument (calling it _ just to indicate it's not used) to that function would be the item from an array we passed in (but we only passed in a length so it doesn't mean much), the second i is the index, which is used for your id:

let sampleData = Array.from({length: 10}, (_, id) => ({id}))

console.log(sampleData)

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5
  • Nice solution @Mark , I had thought that "underline" was a lodash thing. Any pointers to where I can read more about the "underline" and what it means? – Pete Jul 26 '18 at 1:48
  • 5
    @Pete, what the thing you're asking about it -- looks like a character didn't come through. I added a bit about _ it's just a function argument -- could have called it anything. I use _ sometimes for arguments that will be unused or undefined. – Mark Jul 26 '18 at 1:51
  • 1
    Yup, meant the underscore. very elegant. I need of course expand it out so I can understand it. I'll check your answer as soon as SO lets me. – Pete Jul 26 '18 at 1:53
  • 1
    @Pete: _ was added because Mark needed second argument only, so generally using _ to skip arguments that you're not needed. Unless you're using lodash of course – Isaac Jul 26 '18 at 1:53
  • 2
    To add to this, quite a few languages include _ as an actual language feature. It will literally ignore that value. Two examples I can think of off the top of my head would be Rust and Haskell. In Javascript, _ is purely convention and is actually being assigned a value. const a = _ => "hi" + _; is valid code, for instance. It's literally just an identifier. It's to communicate intent rather than to change anything about how it works. – Nathaniel Pisarski Jul 26 '18 at 13:18
16

What I usually do is this:

const data = Array(10).fill().map((v, i) => ({id: i + 1}));
console.log({data});

fill ensures it can be used with map

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1
9

You can use spread operator with Array and then map each undefined element to the object that you want.

var arr = [...Array(10)].map((_,i)=>({id:i}));
console.log(arr)

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3
  • Why do you need to use the spread operator? Is it because otherwise you'll be mapping over an empty sparse array, which has 0 items? – wizzwizz4 Jul 26 '18 at 8:27
  • 4
    Yes, Array(10) just sets the length, it has no items in it. – JohanP Jul 26 '18 at 9:48
  • 1
    Assuming [...Array(10)] is equivalent to Array(10).fill(), isn't the latter more readable? Admittedly, I don't have a very good intuition for what people find clear in Javascript.... – JollyJoker Jul 26 '18 at 13:51
7

You're looking for an anamorphism, or reverse fold –

// unfold : ((r, state) -> List r, unit -> List r, state) -> List r
const unfold = (f, init) =>
  f ( (x, next) => [ x, ...unfold (f, next) ]
    , () => [] 
    , init
    )
    
// sampleData : List { id: Int }
const sampleData =
  unfold
    ( (next, done, i) =>
        i > 25
          ? done ()
          : next ({ id: i }, i + 1)
    , 0
    )
    
console .log (sampleData)
// [ { id: 0 }, { id : 1 }, ... { id: 25 } ]

You can get an intuition for how unfold works by seeing it used in other common programs –

// unfold : ((r, state) -> List r, unit -> List r, state) -> List r
const unfold = (f, init) =>
  f ( (x, next) => [ x, ...unfold (f, next) ]
    , () => []
    , init
    )
    
// fibseq : Int -> List Int
const fibseq = init =>
  unfold
    ( (next, done, [ n, a, b ]) =>
         n === 0
           ? done ()
           : next (a, [ n - 1, b, a + b ])
    , [ init, 0, 1 ]
    )
    
console .log (fibseq (10))
// [ 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34 ]

The implementation of unfold is just one possibility. Get tinkering and implement it in a way of your choosing –

// type Maybe a = Nothing | Just a    

// Just : a -> Maybe a
const Just = x =>
  ({ match: ({ Just: f }) => f (x) })

// Nothing : unit -> Maybe a
const Nothing = () =>
  ({ match: ({ Nothing: f }) => f () })

// unfold : (state -> Maybe (a, state), state) -> List a  
const unfold = (f, init) =>
  f (init) .match
    ( { Nothing: () => []
      , Just: ([ x, next ]) => [ x, ...unfold (f, next) ]
      }
    )

// fibseq : Int -> List Int
const fibseq = init =>
  unfold
    ( ([ n, a, b ]) =>
        n === 0
          ? Nothing ()
          : Just ([ a, [ n - 1, b, a + b ] ]) // <-- yikes, read more below
    , [ init, 0, 1 ]
    )
    
console .log (fibseq (10))
// [ 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34 ]

I cheated a little above using a [] as a tuple. This kept the program shorter but it's better to explicitly model things and consider their types. You tagged this question with functional-programming so it's worth going the extra inch to remove this kind of implicit handling from our programs. By showing this as a separate step, we isolate a technique that can be applied not just to unfold, but for any program we design –

// type Maybe a = Nothing | Just a
// type Tuple a b = { first: a, second: b }

// Just : a -> Maybe a
const Just = x =>
  ({ match: ({ Just: f }) => f (x) })

// Nothing : unit -> Maybe a
const Nothing = () =>
  ({ match: ({ Nothing: f }) => f () })

// Tuple : (a, b) -> Tuple a b
const Tuple = (first, second) =>
  ({ first, second })

// unfold : (state -> Maybe Tuple (a, state), state) -> List a  
const unfold = (f, init) =>
  f (init) .match
    ( { Nothing: () => []
      , Just: (t) => [ t.first, ...unfold (f, t.second) ] // <-- Tuple
      }
    )

// fibseq : Int -> List Int
const fibseq = init =>
  unfold
    ( ([ n, a, b ]) =>
        n === 0
          ? Nothing ()
          : Just (Tuple (a, [ n - 1, b, a + b ])) // <-- Tuple
    , [ init, 0, 1 ]
    )
    
console .log (fibseq (10))
// [ 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34 ]

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7
  • Very nice implementation of an anamorpishm. Unfortunately, ana is sometimes just not enough: tails("ana") yields ["ana", "na", "a", ""]. This cannot be implemented with ana, as Maybe doesn't provide a value for the base case. If you combine Mabye with Either you get an even more general morphism called apo. I picture apo as the big yet kind brother of ana. Happy (un)foldology :D – scriptum May 26 '19 at 15:19
  • Thank you kindly, bob. Indeed tails is tricky to implement with ana but it's still possible using a compound state. Thanks for sharing apo. I like exposure to category theory when I can get it; I don't make enough time to explore the dense topic too thoroughly on my own. Other readers that are feeling lost can start by reading about apomorphism. – Thank you May 26 '19 at 15:48
  • Btw, you should totally show me how to write tails using apo :D – Thank you May 26 '19 at 16:25
  • This cannot be implemented - usually I don't make such absolute claims. If I learn something new, I get all excited though. Anyway, here is my first rough implementation of tails using apo. You probably don't like it, because it's pretty imperative (trampolines, local mutations) etc., so that I can eventually use it in production. – scriptum May 26 '19 at 17:04
  • Recursion schemes without the Fix stuff is totally worth learning. zygo encodes two folds where the latter depends on the former. mutu abstracts mutual recursion also combining two folds. histo gives your algebra access to all intermediate results. futu, well, I am not quite there yet... – scriptum May 26 '19 at 17:08
4

The .from() example is great but if you really want to get creative check this out.

const newArray = length => [...`${Math.pow(10, length) - 1}`]
newArray(2)
newArray(10)

Massively limited though

newArray(1000)
["I", "n", "f", "i", "n", "i", "t", "y"]
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1
  • 6
    This doesn't really answer the question, but in the spirit of fun and creativity have a +1. – Jared Smith Jul 26 '18 at 11:26
3

You can use a simple recursive process to do that.

const iter = (arr, counter) => {
  if (counter === 25) return arr;
  return iter([...arr, {id:counter}], counter + 1)
}
iter([], 0)
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