4

I'm using Apollo Client's <Query> within a component that is re-rendered when state is changed within a lifecycle method. I wish to have my <Query> component re-run the query because I know that data has changed. It appears that Query component is using a cache that needs to be invalidated before query is re-run.

I'm using a wonky workaround that caches the refetch callback from the render prop in the parent component, but it feels wrong. I'll post my approach in the answers if anyone is interested.

My code looks something like this. I removed loading and error handling from query as well as some other detail for brevity.

class ParentComponent extends React.Component {
  componentDidUpdate(prevProps) {
    if (this.props.refetchId !== prevProps.refetchId) {
      const otherData = this.processData() // do something
      this.setState({otherData}) // this forces component to reload
    }
  }

  render() {
    const { otherData } = this.state

    return (
      <Query query={MY_QUERY}>
        {({ data }) => {
          return <ChildComponent gqlData={data} stateData={otherData} />
        }}
      </Query>
    )
  }
}

How do I force <Query> to fetch new data to pass to <ChildComponent>?

Even though ParentComponent re-renders when props or state change, Query doesn't re-run. ChildComponent gets an updated stateData prop, but has a stale gqlData prop. As I understand Apollo's query cache need to be invalidated, but I'm not sure.

Please note that passing refetch to ChildComponent is not the answer because it only displays information from GraphQL and wouldn't know when to refetch. I don't want to introduce timers or otherwise complicate ChildComponent to solve this - it doesn't need to know about this complexity or data fetching concerns.

  • I added couple options, I always used the first one, the second method would not work if you do not want to pass anything down. – leogoesger Jul 26 '18 at 3:40
2

It seems to me that the Query component doesn't necessarily need to be inside this ParentComponent.

In that case, I would move the Query component up, since I would still be able to render other stuff while I don't have results in the ChildComponent. And then I would have access to the query.refetch method.

Note that in the example I added the graphql hoc, but you can still use Query component around <ParentComponent />.

class ParentComponent extends React.Component {
    componentDidUpdate(prevProps) {
        if (this.props.refetchId !== prevProps.refetchId) {
            const otherData = this.processData() // do something

            //   won't need this anymore, since refetch will cause the Parent component to rerender)
            //   this.setState({otherData}) // this forces component to reload 

            this.props.myQuery.refetch(); // >>> Refetch here!
        }
    }

    render() {
        const {
            otherData
        } = this.state;

        return <ChildComponent gqlData={this.props.myQuery} stateData={otherData} />;
    }
}

export graphql(MY_QUERY, {
    name: 'myQuery'
})(ParentComponent);
  • 2
    Thanks. This opened my eyes a bit. Basically, <Query> is a poor choice for almost any use case other than the most trivial ones. – Andrei R Jul 27 '18 at 2:42
  • Yes. I end up not using it that much. This this solve your problem? – Pedro Baptista Afonso Jul 27 '18 at 10:42
1

Could you refetch in parent component? Once the parent component get an update, then you can evaluate whether to trigger a fetch or not.

I have done it without using Query like the following:

class ParentComp extends React.Component {

    lifeCycleHook(e) { //here
        // call your query here
        this.props.someQuery()
    }

    render() {
        return (
            <div>
                <Child Comp data={this.props.data.key}> //child would only need to render data
            </div>
        );
    }
}

export default graphql(someQuery)(SongCreate);

So you can trigger your fetch anytime you want it to. You can get the query as a prop in this case.

For your case, you would put your query into a prop using export default graphql(addSongQuery)(SongCreate);. Then call it in your lifecyclehooks DidUpdate.

Another options is to use refetch on Query.

<Query
    query={GET_DOG_PHOTO}
    variables={{ breed }}
    skip={!breed}
  >
    {({ loading, error, data, refetch }) => {
      if (loading) return null;
      if (error) return `Error!: ${error}`;

      return (
        <div>
          <img
            src={data.dog.displayImage}
            style={{ height: 100, width: 100 }}
          />
          <button onClick={() => refetch()}>Refetch!</button>
        </div>
      );
    }}
  </Query>

The second method would require you pass something down to your child, which isn't really all that bad.

  • in both of your examples child component does something to trigger a rerender. as described in the question, child component doesn't know when to trigger a rerender (it's not interactive). thanks, but this is not really what i'm after – Andrei R Jul 26 '18 at 6:27
  • 1
    no, the first one does not. The parent has the query as a prop, and you can re-render using lifecycle hooks. – leogoesger Jul 26 '18 at 15:09
  • ah, I see. now that you've simplified it, it's easier to follow. thanks. – Andrei R Jul 26 '18 at 23:45
  • Great! Glad to be working @AndreiR. Let me know how it turns out. If works, could you up-vote and accept the answer for other viewers? Thanks – leogoesger Jul 27 '18 at 0:50

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