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I have been looking into deep learning frameworks lately and have been wondering about the origin of the name of PyTorch.

With Keras, their home page nicely explains the name's origin, and with something like TensorFlow, the reasoning behind the name seems rather clear. For PyTorch, however, I cannot seem to come across why it is so named.

Of course, I understand the "Py-" prefix and also know that PyTorch is a successor in some sense of Torch. But I am still wondering: what is the original idea behind the "-Torch" part? Is it known what the origin of the name is?

Thanks for any help!

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    Is this just an off-topic question for this site, is there not enough research effort, or something else? – Grayscale Jul 26 '18 at 4:17
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    @Mr.J The article did not contain what I am looking for. – Grayscale Jul 26 '18 at 4:20
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    @Mr.J I looked through some of those and no clear answer. – Grayscale Jul 26 '18 at 4:22
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    @brunodesthuilliers Is it not okay to ask about software tools rather than programming itself? From the on-topic page, SO says that "if your question generally covers a specific programming problem, or a software algorithm, or software tools commonly used by programmers; and is a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development then you’re in the right place to ask your question!" I think my question could fall under asking about "a software tool commonly used by programmers." It may not be "practical" though depending on interpretation. Is that the issue? – Grayscale Jul 26 '18 at 13:54
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    @Grayscale yes it's mostly about the "practical" part indeed. – bruno desthuilliers Jul 26 '18 at 14:12
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This is a good question, not sure why it was down-voted: there is a lot of information and history stored in the names that are chosen for artifacts.

Here a short answer, formed as another question:

Torch, SMORCH ???

PyTorch developed from Torch7. A precursor to the original Torch was a library called SVM-Torch (http://bengio.abracadoudou.com/SVMTorch.html), which was developed around 2001. The SVM stands for Support Vector Machines.

SVM-Torch is a decomposition algorithm similar to SVM-Light (http://svmlight.joachims.org/), but adapted to regression problems, according to this paper:

http://www.ai.mit.edu/projects/jmlr/papers/volume1/collobert01a/collobert01a.ps.gz

Also around this time, G.W.Flake described the sequential minimal optimization algorithm (SMO), which could be used to train SVMs on sparse data sets, and this was incorporated into NODElib.

Interestingly, this was called the SMORCH algorithm. You can find this paper on the wayback machine:

https://web.archive.org/web/20030319153242/http://www.neci.nj.nec.com/homepages/flake/smorch.ps

And more about SMORCH in the NODElib docs: https://github.com/gwf/NODElib/blob/master/include/nodelib/svm.h

Optimization of the SVMs is:

  • performed by a variation of John Platt's sequential minimal
  • optimization (SMO) algorithm. This version of SMO is generalized
  • for regression, uses kernel caching, and incorporates several
  • heuristics; for these reasons, we refer to the optimization
  • algorithm as SMORCH.

So SMORCH =

Sequential Minimal Optimization Regression Caching Heuristics

I can't answer definitively, but my thinking is "Torch" is a riff or evolution of "Light" from SVM-Light combined with a large helping of SMORCHiness. You'd need to check in with the authors of SVMTorch and SVM-Light to confirm that this is indeed what "sparked" the name. It is reasonable to assume that the "TO" of Torch stands for some other optimization, rather than SMO, such as Tensor Optimization, but I haven't found any direct reference...yet.

Update 12/3/2018: in comments below.

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    Wow, the history of the name is indeed quite interesting! I wonder if the move from SVM-Light to SVM-Torch has to do with a combination of the use of SMORCH and also a bit of a throwback to the old name in that torches produce light... – Grayscale Oct 17 '18 at 5:29
  • Also are you sure that SVM-Torch uses SMORCH? – Grayscale Oct 17 '18 at 5:31
  • Downvoted, because this question has nothing to do with programming and should be closed. What if I ask why Java is called Java or Android is called Android? Won't it be closed? – user1209216 Dec 3 '18 at 19:12
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    @user1209216 - Strongly disagree. That's like saying PHP has nothing to do with programming Personal Home Pages. It's nonsense to say that discussion about programming can't include the name of the programming language or algorithm itself...names sum up the entire 'gist' of the tool and are a great way to understand what a thing is, and its context. – Good Lux Dec 3 '18 at 19:19
  • And Android is a reference to writer Philip K Dick...cool, but agreed, not nearly as programming related on the surface, and Java just sounds cooler than Oak. If you dig in to who actually gave them those names, you will learn a lot about programming though! – Good Lux Dec 3 '18 at 19:24
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The name originates from the original Torch framework, "an open source machine learning library, a scientific computing framework, and a script language based on the Lua programming language."

It's developed by the Facebook A.I research group.

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    I note this in the question. Why is Torch called Torch though? – Grayscale Aug 3 '18 at 18:55
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Torch is a framework to make and train deep learning Models, Torch was back dated so The team of PyTorch took the framework and convert it into python language, this is why it is called as PyTorch 'Py' from Python and 'Torch' from previous Torch framework This is video of interview of Co Founder of PyTorch Soumith Chintala by Udacity about how he got started

https://www.youtube.com/embed/0eLXNFv6aT8

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Py - Using the python programming language

Torch - The architecture of the PyTorch framework is similar to the original Torch.

This is the main reason why PyTorch is named as PyTorch.

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