1

whazzup,

Having the following problem, I can't get it fixed. Handling with numbers having a length around 5 - 52, I wan't to get their prime factors. Using Python, I found the following two algorithms:

I.

def faktorisiere(n):
    l = []  # Lösungsmenge
    # Auf Teilbarkeit durch 2, und alle ungeraden Zahlen von 3..n/2 testen
    for i in chain([2], range(3, n//2 + 1, 2)):
        # Ein Teiler kann mehrfach vorkommen (z.B. 4 = 2 * 2), deswegen:
        while n % i == 0:
            l.append(i)
            print(i)
            n = n // i  # "//" ist ganzzahlige Division und entspricht int(n/i)
        if i > n:  # Alle Teiler gefunden? Dann Abbruch.
            break
    print(l)

II.

x = input("Number: ")
mode = x[-1:]
x = int(x[:-1])
if int(x) < 1000000000000:
    faktorisiere(x)
else:
    if mode == 'f':
        faktorisiere(x)
    rx = int(sqrt(x)) + 1

    for i in range(1, rx+1):
        if mode == 'a':
            if x % i == 0:
                y = int(x/i)
                print(str(x), "=", i, "*", str(y))
        if mode == 'u':
            if i % 2 != 0:
                if x % i == 0:
                    y = int(x/i)
                    print(str(x), "=", i, "*", str(y))

But the first code is very slow computing numbers like these: 1917141215419419171412154194191714

The second is working a little faster, but I get wrong outputs and I can't find the mistake in code. As an example we take the given number. These are the first lines of pythons output:

  • 1917141215419419171412154194191714 = 1 * 1917141215419419143900621852114944

  • 1917141215419419171412154194191714 = 2 * 958570607709709571950310926057472

  • 1917141215419419171412154194191714 = 3 * 639047071806473023947675938062336

But as you can see, these multiplications don't equal the result. Is there any mistake in the code? Or is it just because of the length of numbers? Hope you can help me.

Best wishes, TimeMen

4
  • 3
    Factorising very large numbers is very difficult. There's no known algorithm to do it quickly. – khelwood Jul 26 '18 at 7:59
  • I think in my case it's no problem if it contains some seconds or minutes. But I don't know why I get these wrong outputs. And yeah, I know that's difficult factorise large numbers like these. It's really sad, that nobody has found an effective algorithm – js-on Jul 26 '18 at 8:03
  • 1
    Those are rounding errors, use y = x//i instead of int(x/y) as you did in algo I. – VPfB Jul 26 '18 at 8:29
  • Thanks for the advice. So it's like dividing exactly without rounding any part of the result? – js-on Jul 26 '18 at 11:34
3

You need a better algorithm than trial division to factor numbers the size you are working with. A simple step up from trial division is John Pollard's rho algorithm:

Python 2.7.13 (default, Mar 13 2017, 20:56:15)
[GCC 5.4.0] on cygwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> def isPrime(n, k=5): # miller-rabin
...     from random import randint
...     if n < 2: return False
...     for p in [2,3,5,7,11,13,17,19,23,29]:
...         if n % p == 0: return n == p
...     s, d = 0, n-1
...     while d % 2 == 0:
...         s, d = s+1, d/2
...     for i in range(k):
...         x = pow(randint(2, n-1), d, n)
...         if x == 1 or x == n-1: continue
...         for r in range(1, s):
...             x = (x * x) % n
...             if x == 1: return False
...             if x == n-1: break
...         else: return False
...     return True
...
>>> def factors(n, b2=-1, b1=10000): # 2,3,5-wheel, then rho
...     def gcd(a,b): # euclid's algorithm
...         if b == 0: return a
...         return gcd(b, a%b)
...     def insertSorted(x, xs): # linear search
...         i, ln = 0, len(xs)
...         while i < ln and xs[i] < x: i += 1
...         xs.insert(i,x)
...         return xs
...     if -1 <= n <= 1: return [n]
...     if n < -1: return [-1] + factors(-n)
...     wheel = [1,2,2,4,2,4,2,4,6,2,6]
...     w, f, fs = 0, 2, []
...     while f*f <= n and f < b1:
...         while n % f == 0:
...             fs.append(f)
...             n /= f
...         f, w = f + wheel[w], w+1
...         if w == 11: w = 3
...     if n == 1: return fs
...     h, t, g, c = 1, 1, 1, 1
...     while not isPrime(n):
...         while b2 <> 0 and g == 1:
...             h = (h*h+c)%n # the hare runs
...             h = (h*h+c)%n # twice as fast
...             t = (t*t+c)%n # as the tortoise
...             g = gcd(t-h, n); b2 -= 1
...         if b2 == 0: return fs
...         if isPrime(g):
...             while n % g == 0:
...                 fs = insertSorted(g, fs)
...                 n /= g
...         h, t, g, c = 1, 1, 1, c+1
...     return insertSorted(n, fs)
...
>>> factors(1917141215419419171412154194191714)
[2, 3, 13, 449941L, 54626569996995593878495243L]

The factorization is returned immediately. See here for an explanation of how it works. To factor even larger numbers, you will need to look at algorithms like the elliptic curve method or the quadratic sieve, but beware that both those algorithms are complicated.

3
  • I have red something about the quadratic sieve and it wasn't sounding that easy, you're right. What's the L behind the two last numbers meaning? Thanks for the code, I'll take a look at it and trying to understand what's happening in there. – js-on Jul 26 '18 at 12:25
  • L is for long integers, too big to store in a machine-native integer. I'm not sure why 449941 is marked long, but the other factor is certainly long. – user448810 Jul 26 '18 at 12:33
  • Thanks for the information user448810. Trying to implement it into my code, I don't get any result back, just an empty var. But thank you anyway for posting this algo, I'll try to get it fixed the next days. – js-on Jul 26 '18 at 12:44

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.