11

So I have an object array that as follows:

var array = [
    {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
    {name:"Mars", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
    {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-02', amt:250 },
    {name:"Saturn", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
    {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-02', amt:250 },
    {name:"Jupiter", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
]

I want to filter data depending if the name, amount and date has duplicate. This one doesn't filter even a duplicate name.

var unique = array.filter((v, i, a) =>{ return a.indexOf(v) === i});

How can I filter duplicate for this one based on name, amount and date?

7
  • 1
    it is not clear: once do you have 2 items that have equal name value but different date and amt. do you need to exclude them or not?
    – skyboyer
    Jul 26, 2018 at 11:22
  • The most simple solution is to unique this array 3 times: array = _.uniqBy(array, 'name'); array = _.uniqBy(array, 'date'); array = _.uniqBy(array, 'amt'); But it's not efficient
    – dark_gf
    Jul 26, 2018 at 11:25
  • @skyboyer NO. only if the 3 values are duplicate.
    – Eem Jee
    Jul 26, 2018 at 11:42
  • @ramj then check by answer (second solution) _.uniq(array);, only you need lodash library
    – dark_gf
    Jul 26, 2018 at 11:51
  • 1
    @Sylwester that's incorreect - the indexOf function when passed an object will only compare the object's reference for an exact match within the array, and does not do a deep comparison on the keys or values therein.
    – Alnitak
    Jul 26, 2018 at 14:27

11 Answers 11

19

Try this code it returns unique objects only.

var data = [
{name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
{name:"Mars", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
{name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-02', amt:250 },
{name:"Saturn", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
{name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-02', amt:250 },
{name:"Jupiter", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
]
var resArr = [];
data.filter(function(item){
  var i = resArr.findIndex(x => (x.name == item.name && x.date == item.date && x.amt == item.amt));
  if(i <= -1){
        resArr.push(item);
  }
  return null;
});
console.log(resArr)

Do tell me if this is not what you're looking for.

2
  • Thanks for this. Much simpler and cleaner.
    – Eem Jee
    Jul 27, 2018 at 9:40
  • Your welcome sir. If this was your desired solution then please mark it correct. :) Jul 27, 2018 at 9:44
16

Just try this:

     var array = [
        {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
        {name:"Mars", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
        {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-02', amt:250 },
        {name:"Saturn", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
        {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-02', amt:250 },
        {name:"Jupiter", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
    ]

    var unique = Array.from(new Set(array.map(JSON.stringify))).map(JSON.parse);
    
    console.log(unique)

2
  • Good Solution but it will only work when the objects are identical(all the values of objects are same). Jun 18, 2019 at 8:15
  • 5
    Won't work if one of the elements in the array is {amt:250,name:"Jupiter",date"2018-07-01"} (i.e., same data in a different property order) Jun 4, 2020 at 1:42
7

A solution with Array.prototype.filter and Set:

var data=[{name:"Joe",date:"2018-07-01",amt:250},{name:"Mars",date:"2018-07-01",amt:250},{name:"Joe",date:"2018-07-02",amt:250},{name:"Saturn",date:"2018-07-01",amt:250},{name:"Joe",date:"2018-07-02",amt:250},{name:"Jupiter",date:"2018-07-01",amt:250}];

var filtered = data.filter(function({name, date, amt}) {
    var key = `${name}${date}${amt}`;
    return !this.has(key) && this.add(key);
}, new Set);

console.log(filtered);

1
  • 2
    VERY elegant use of the callback thisarg
    – mplungjan
    Jun 25, 2021 at 8:39
5

var array = [
    {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
    {name:"Mars", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
    {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-02', amt:250 },
    {name:"Saturn", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
    {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-02', amt:250 },
    {name:"Jupiter", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
]

let answer = [];

array.forEach(x => {
  if(!answer.some(y => JSON.stringify(y) === JSON.stringify(x))){
    answer.push(x)
  }
})

console.log(answer)

An alternative solution. You can use Array#forEach, Array#some, JSON.stringify to achieve what you want

1
  • Except if one of the elements in the array is {amt:250,name:"Jupiter",date"2018-07-01"} (i.e., same data in a different property order) Jun 4, 2020 at 1:42
2

You can use https://lodash.com/ library

If you need unique by only one value:

array = _.uniqWith(array, function(arrVal, othVal) {
    return arrVal.name == othVal.name || arrVal.date == othVal.date || arrVal.amt == othVal.amt;
}) 
console.log(array);

And if you need to remove unique by complete object:

array = _.uniq(array);
console.log(array);
2
  • @dark_gf What or where does _.uniqWith come from?
    – Eem Jee
    Jul 27, 2018 at 1:16
  • Yep it's a lodash library lodash.com . There is quite a lot of similar libs. I've modified answer
    – dark_gf
    Jul 27, 2018 at 8:01
1

This code shows the duplicates in your console. If you want to print everything except the duplicates swap the return true with return false and the return false with return true.

var orders = [
    {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
    {name:"Mars", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
    {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-02', amt:250 },
    {name:"Saturn", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
    {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-02', amt:250 },
    {name:"Jupiter", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
];

orders = orders.filter( (order, index) => {

  // iterate over the array to check for possible duplicates
  // iterating over the items we already checked isn't necessary so we start at index+1
  for( let i = index+1; i<orders.length; i++ ){
    if(
      orders[i].name === order.name
      && orders[i].date === order.date
      && orders[i].amt === order.amt
    ){
     // just logging this stuff so you can see what happens
     console.log( `${index} is a duplicate of ${i}` );
     // if a duplicate is found return true to the filter function
     return true; 
    }
  }
  // if no duplication is found return false to the filter function
  return false;
  
}); // end filter 

// log the result to the console
console.log(orders);

1

Given your origin array:

var array = [
    {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
    {name:"Mars", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
    {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-02', amt:250 },
    {name:"Saturn", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
    {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-02', amt:250 },
    {name:"Jupiter", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 }
];

You need a function to determine the criteria you want to check to make your object comparable with anothers.

UPDATE

Such a function could be an hash function that you should write to create a unique key to identify your objects and compare each other.

The proper hash function should return the same value if called with objects that have the same composed key.

In your case, when 2 objects have name, date and amount with the same value, the hash function is supposed to return the same value.

So you can directly compare hash values instead of objects.

In the case you asked for, all the values concurred to the filter, and here is a very trivial example of such a function, that is not proper an "hash" as the output is variable (should produce a fixed length value instead):

function objectHash (obj) {
    return Object.values(obj).reduce((a, b) => {
        a += b;
        return a;
    }, '');
}

Now, you are now able to easily and properly compare items in your array in order to filter duplication.

var arrayMap = array.reduce((acc, item) => {
    var hash = objectHash(item);
    if (typeof acc[hash] === 'undefined') {
        acc[hash] = Object.assign({}, item);
    }
    return acc;
}, {})

Then you have an object with unique key values, and to have back your unique array:

 var uniqueArray = Object.values(arrayMap);

Now you have your data.

5
  • A "hash" function can be expected to have collisions. What you are describing is not a hash function, because you require uniqueness.
    – Alnitak
    Jul 26, 2018 at 13:50
  • You're right it's not an "hash" function as an hash is a constant length output value calculated from a given variable length value in input. I used the word "hash" just to give an idea of a value that is calculated from the object. Jul 27, 2018 at 6:40
  • Constant length is not a prerequisite for a hash either (and that isn't even true in your code where your so-called "hash" could be of variable length). Please fix your answer, because as written it's very misleading.
    – Alnitak
    Jul 27, 2018 at 9:45
  • What I wrote is a trivial example and a real hash algorithm is not necessary needed to achieve the result in this particular case. The point is that helps to understand the concept of a string unique representation of the object that helps in compare functions. And when I wrote "constant" I ment "fixed". Jul 27, 2018 at 14:35
  • I don't object to the technique, I object to you calling it a hash because a true hashing algorithm is precisely not the right way to generate a unique key unless you've got an exceedingly collision tolerant algorithm (e.g. SHA-1 or better) but that would be overkill for this use case.
    – Alnitak
    Jul 27, 2018 at 21:58
0

This works by requiring by filtering the array such that the only elements included are those whose first matching entry in the original array (aliased as a) has the same index as the element currently being examined:

let uniq = array.filter(({name, date, amount}, index, a) =>
               a.findIndex(e => name === e.name &&
                                date === e.date &&
                              amount === e.amount) === index);
2
0

Here is how I would have done it:

const array = [
    {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
    {name:"Mars", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
    {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-02', amt:250 },
    {name:"Saturn", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
    {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-02', amt:250 },
    {name:"Jupiter", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 },
];

function uniqueBy(arr, key, $some = false) {
  if (key instanceof Array) {
    if ($some) {
      return key.reduce(uniqueBy, arr);
    } else {
      const fnUnique = (obj) =>
        key.reduce((a, k) => `${a}-${obj[k]}`, '');
      return Object.values(arr.reduce((a, v) => {
          const key = fnUnique(v)
          return a[key] === undefined ? (a[key] = v, a) : a;
      }, {}));
  }
}
return Object.values(arr.reduce((a, v) => (a[v[key]] === undefined ? (a[v[key]] = v, a) : a), {}));
}

// print unique objects based on the given fields
console.log(uniqueBy(array, ['name', 'date', 'amt']));

// print unique objects based on any unique value in any given fields
console.log(uniqueBy(array, ['name', 'date', 'amt'], true));

This only cares about the given fields and thus you can get less results if you had objects that were duplicates but had other properties that were not interesting.

Passing true as the third argument treats the fields as unique themselves. Thus the result will only have objects where all the fields are unique and thus since the amount is the same you end up with one element.

2
  • But where's Mars, Saturn and Jupiter? My expected output is like this: const array = [ {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 }, {name:"Mars", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 }, {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-02', amt:250 }, {name:"Saturn", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 }, {name:"Jupiter", date:'2018-07-01', amt:250 }, ]; Removing one {name:"Joe", date:'2018-07-02', amt:250 },` since it's a duplicate entry.
    – Eem Jee
    Jul 27, 2018 at 2:11
  • 1
    @ramj They are gone because they had the same amount. I figured you wanted to remove the ones that had any of the columns duplictaed and thus the result would only have the ones with a unique name, a unique date and a unique value. I've added support for the one you wanted, but you really should have added the expected result in your question.
    – Sylwester
    Jul 27, 2018 at 10:38
0

Code to Filter unique id with name

{id: 555, name: "Sales", person: "Jordan" },
{id: 555, name: "Sales", person: "Bob" },
{id: 555, name: "Sales", person: "John" },
{id: 777, name: "Accounts Payable", person: "Rhoda" },
{id: 777, name: "Accounts Payable", person: "Harry" },
{id: 888, name: "IT", person: "Joe" },
{id: 888, name: "IT", person: "Jake" },
];
var unique = [];
var tempArr = [];
data.forEach((value, index) => {
    if (unique.indexOf(value.name) === -1) {
        unique.push(value.name);
        tempArr.push(value.id);
    }
});
console.log('Unique Ids', tempArr);
0

A simple and generic solution using typescript and building upon the accepted answer above. This returns an array of unique objects of the same type as the original array, checking all properties, and should work for all types of objects. It also works if the order of the properties is different in different items (in which case the JSON.stringify approach fails).

getDistinctObjectArray<T>(arr: T[]) {
    return arr.filter((item, ix, self) =>
      self.findIndex(f => 
        Object.keys(item).every(k => f[k] === item[k])) === ix);
  }

It works by filtering the array: for each item, it searches the array for the first occurrence of an item which has the same values for all its properties. If the index of the found item is not the same index as the current item, it is removed from the list.

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