11

So I'm starting a journey down the road of microservices. I've spent some hours online trying immerse myself into this topic.

One concept I'm not quite grasping yet is the idea of not using SQL joins and therefore having a small independent database for authors and the same for books.

So I understand the following SQL:

BooksTable - id, name, authorid
AuthorsTable - id, name

select book.name, author.name from book 
join author on book.authorId = author.id

In Node.js world

index.js

app.get('/api/books' bookDomain.get());

bookDomain.js

exports.get = () => {
  const books = bookService.get();

  const authors = authorService.get();

  /*
    This is where I'm lost: how do you achieve the simple SQL 
    above? I'm assuming in the domain is where this information is 
    "joined"? am I correct?
  */
};

Services

Database1
**bookService.js**
database context

Database2
**authorService.js**
database context

expected data (something like it, basically i'm saying JSON should be the return type)

[{
  book {
    "name": "Book 1",
    "author": "Author Name 1"
  }
},
{
  book {
    "name": "Book 2",
    "author": "Author Name 2"
  }
}]
  • 1
    If you are going the microservice per database route your two options are to join the data on the application side or in a third web service method via foreign key (so even though your data is physically seperated you're still using relational data in actuallity, just without the conveniences of a sql join). microservices.io/patterns/data/database-per-service.html – Sal Jul 29 '18 at 15:46
8
+100

There are at least three ways that I can think of to solve this problem.

  1. Document Model NoSQL DB: Instead of using a SQL DB, consider using a document model NoSQL DB like Mongo DB. So instead of a relational DB with the tables like Books and Authors and an AuthorBooks table that are all joined on a pair of foreign keys - you can use a document NoSQL DB like Mongo where your books are stored as document type, in a BSON format that looks almost identical to the JSON in your question. A nice feature of document DBs like Mongo is that you can set up an index on JSON inside the Book document on Author, thus improving your query time. This is discussed quite well in NoSQL Distilled by Martin Fowler (Sec. 2.2 and Chp. 9).
  2. Break the foreign key relationship so that referential integrity is maintained by the service instead of the DB: Instead of relying on the relational DB to enforce referential integrity for you (via the maintenance of foreign keys) restrict access of the DB to just your microservice and maintain the integrity of foreign keys by your service itself. This tactic is discussed by Sam Newman in Building Microservices on pp. 84-85.
  3. Denormalize the DB: Instead of having two tables each for books and authors, just combine them into a denormalized table. So, create a new table where the info for your books is duplicated and author info is unique to each book per row. It's ugly. Searches now have a larger search space, but it's simple too. For example, something like the following format:

    book_id | book_name              | book_author
    =====================================================
          1 | NoSQL Distilled        | Pramod J. Sadalage
    -----------------------------------------------------
          1 | NoSQL Distilled        | Martin Fowler
    -----------------------------------------------------
          2 | Building Microservices | Sam Newman
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  • 1
    Good answer. As an addendum, I would also question whether the boundaries for the service are correct. In this example, author and book seem tightly coupled and breaking them apart in two different services might not even make sense. – jdno Jul 30 '18 at 8:31
  • Thanks for the compliment. The author and books domains do seem tightly coupled. However, if you want to split them into different services, the question for me is whether or not authors need to be split out into its own domain. Do authors need to be accessed outside the context of their book? If not you may not want to tease out a separate microservice. For microservices, one school of thought is that you limit one microservice to one bounded context (i.e. books domain and authors domain). Building Microservices discusses this on pp. 31-34. – entpnerd Jul 30 '18 at 16:53
  • @entpnerd there might be a difference, in between the theory and practical application ... because when having these as two fully individual domains/services, one has to create tons of duplicate records, in order to represent it alike that (the book/author domains are somewhat huge and splitting them a) adds further capacity and b) maintaining their integrity requires more processing)... eg. one database from which both services fetch appears to be the most practical solution approach. – Martin Zeitler Jul 31 '18 at 6:10
  • @MartinZeitler It's true. There is often a difference between theory and practice. And for existing systems, it's often a question of whether or not the change to the ideal is actually worth it. Unless you need access to the author domain outside of the context of a book, it probably isn't worth it to split out the two. – entpnerd Jul 31 '18 at 19:16
4

the basic idea to require two separate services appears questionable in this case, because 1 author may have written N books, just as well as 1 book can have N authors. and also, the idea of having to use the own database appears questionable - because there are libraries alike node-isbn, which one can wrap up into a service, which one can query for author, title and the ISBN number.

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2

For me, There are some options that we can choose:

  • Do the mapping on server. book service get the list of books from DB and then get the authorIds, using them to internally call the author service for getting author name.

  • Let the client doing the lazy loading. In this case, the book service return list of books (id, name, authorId). The client then need to aggregate list of authorId and call author service to get the name of authors. Finally, the client do the map itself.

  • Denormalizing DB. We have 2 options

options 1: Add authorName column to book DB.

options 2: Have a new NoSQL database to cache data from both book and author. With this option, It's also good for large scale application where the amount of request to get data is large (or even need search and the other query requirements).

In the 2 above options. We need to make sure every change to author table need to be synced to the related denormalized piece of information.

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2

My preferred way would look like this:

First, as already mentioned by others it is arguable if an AuthorService is needed, or if it is too close on the Book and therefore could be part of the BookService.

So, for this example I name it PersonService, because this way your future ConferenceService could use it.

By following the Microservice approach, you have to be aware of two goals you want to achieve:

  • Loose coupling
  • Cohesive behavior

this implies that those two services are not allowed to share a Database (it could be the same physically, but not logically), so that the BookService cannot modify the data of the PersonService. This has to be done by the PersonService exclusively. Otherwise Cohesive behavior would be put at risk. So we have two services with a separate database each.

I assume a RESTful API for these two services, what is great because we want to couple loosely. A JSON could look like this:

[{
    book {
        "name": "Book 1",
        "author": {
            "name": "Author Name 1"
            "href": "apis.yourdomain.com/personservice/persons/1"
            "type": "application/json"
        }

    }
},
{
    book {
        "name": "Book 2",
        "author": {
            "name": "Author Name 2"
            "href": "apis.yourdomain.com/personservice/persons/2"
            "type": "application/json"
        }
    }
}]

As you can see, those Authors are only represented as Link referencing (an entity in) the PersonService. This coupling is loose because a Link is less likely to change as a representation of a Person throughout the lifetime of you application. By naming the field author you also get the semantics of the relation between Book and Person. Of course frontend applications tend to not want that much requests for rendering a page, this has to be taken into account by expanding those Links. I prefer to have a Model-objekt, that holds only Links and a Representation-object that has the Links of its corresponding model expanded by calling the Link. In cases when you don't want to do time based caching, this has proven very valuable to me.

But things could get complicated very easily. Assume a rule like "A domain object can only be emitted by the corresponding service" in order to achieve Cohesive behavior. This means that only the BookService is allowed to deliver Books. Now imagine a request like "all books by Martin Fowler". Which service should be queried? Following the above rule, it should be the BookService. But how does the BookService know of a thing called Martin Fowler, he just knows Books? In such a case there is a thing called non-authoritative cache (which could also be persisted in a DB). This just means that the BookService is allowed to store Persons in a cache or in a database, but is not allowed to share them with others. This way the above rule is still followed and the Cohesive behavior still at hand. The non-authoritative cache does not need to reflect the full domain object Person, but everything necessary to fulfill the UseCases.

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