2

Here is a tiny example regarding mocking a class method of module Email. The method is called connect_and_send:

require 'minitest/autorun'
module Email
  def self.connect_and_send(*args)
    nil
  end
end
class Test < Minitest::Test
  def test_it
    fake = Minitest::Mock.new
    fake.expect :connect_and_send, nil, ['a', 'b', 'c']
    Email.stub :connect_and_send, fake do
      Email.connect_and_send 'a', 'b', 'z'
    end
    fake.verify
  end
end

The example is intended to verify that the method is invoked, along with its arguments.

But it produces an error message that connect_and_send was expected, but not invoked!

  1) Error:
Test#test_it:
MockExpectationError: expected connect_and_send("a", "b", "c") => nil
    -:14:in 'test_it'

1 runs, 0 assertions, 0 failures, 1 errors, 0 skips

Instead, I thought it would produce an error message that the method (connect_and_send) was given incorrect arguments.

Using Minitest, how can I stub with a mock, and also verify its arguments?

6

The answer is to expect method, :call, instead of expecting method, connect_and_send. The following code:

require 'minitest/autorun'
module Email
  def self.connect_and_send(*args)
    nil
  end
end
class Test < Minitest::Test
  def test_it
    fake = Minitest::Mock.new
    fake.expect :call, nil, ['a', 'b', 'c']
    Email.stub :connect_and_send, fake do
      Email.connect_and_send 'a', 'b', 'z'
    end
    fake.verify
  end
end

verifies, in the desired way, which arguments were passed to the method, connect_and_send.

It gives the proper error message, that the stubbed method was passed the incorrect arguments:

  1) Error:
Test#test_it:
MockExpectationError: mocked method :call called with unexpected arguments ["a", "b", "z"]
    -:12:in 'block in test_it'
    -:11:in 'test_it'

1 runs, 0 assertions, 0 failures, 1 errors, 0 skips

And it proves that the code under test invoked the method, connect_and_send.

If an object has multiple methods you wish to stub—while verifying their arguments—then use more than one mock.

Here's Minitest's documentation of Object#stub. Technically it's correct, when it says of its second parameter (see the third line):

#stub(name, val_or_callable, *block_args) ⇒ Object

Add a temporary stubbed method replacing name for the duration of the block.
If val_or_callable responds to #call, then it returns the result of calling it[.]

Yet, I suppose that many people (as did I) will misread the documentation in this phrase as meaning, instead, a "call" to the stubbed method, such as—in this example—the connect_and_send method. Why? Because:

  1. In the third line, the word, 'call' has two meanings; and

  2. The hash character # in #call slightly resembles each of the letters E, H, and T, which are all that's required, in order to misread #call as:

If val_or_callable responds to the call, then it returns the result of calling it[.]

Anyway, the documentation IMO would be improved by adding the word, "method":

If val_or_callable has a #call method, then it returns the result of invoking it[.]

To me, the examples in the Minitest documentation (in Object#stub and Mock) perhaps seem somewhat incomplete, when mocking and stubbing are combined.

Again, when you verify arguments passed to your mock (using Minitest), you should expect method :call, instead of expecting the method you're stubbing!

1
  • Is there way to see the diff between the expected and the received args? – Ben Jan 6 at 21:48

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