-1

I have the following simple recursive function:

def draw_interval(center_length):
    if center_length > 0: 
        print('first value: {}'.format(center_length))
        draw_interval(center_length - 1)      
        print('second value: {}'.format(center_length))              

draw_interval(3)

and the output is:

first value: 3
first value: 2
first value: 1
second value: 1
second value: 2
second value: 3

My question is why that is the case, and the function runs draw_interval(center_length - 1) even after center_length > 0 is False. I already saw a similar question, but my question points to a different angle of recursive functionalities and conditional statements in Python.

4
  • I'm not sure I understand your problem. What other behaviour would you assume?
    – k-nut
    Commented Jul 26, 2018 at 19:59
  • "the function runs draw_interval(center_length - 1) even after center_length > 0 is False": why do you think so? It is not the case.
    – trincot
    Commented Jul 26, 2018 at 19:59
  • the block of If statement runs if the condition is True, I guess, But after printing first value: 1, it continues running. Am I missing some points here?
    – mk_sch
    Commented Jul 26, 2018 at 20:01
  • It’s worth pasting your code into PythonTutor.com or another interactive visualizer—or just using the debugger, if you know how—and stepping through step by step. Everything should become a lot clearer from that, than from anything anyone can explain abstractly.
    – abarnert
    Commented Jul 26, 2018 at 20:14

4 Answers 4

3

This is how your function recurses:

draw_interval(3):
    center_length > 0 is true
    "first value 3"
    draw_interval(2):
        center_length > 0 is true
        "first value 2"
        draw_interval(1):
            center_length > 0 is true
            "first value 1"
            draw_interval(0):
                center_length > 0 is FALSE: no more calls to `draw_interval` are made
                execution returns to draw_interval(1)
            "second value 1"
            execution returns to draw_interval(2)
        "second value 2"
        execution returns to draw_interval(3)
    "second value 3"
    execution returns to the end of your program

It does not run draw_interval(center_length - 1) after center_length > 0 is False.

3
  • Why after the FALSE line, execution returns to draw_interval(1) ?
    – mk_sch
    Commented Jul 26, 2018 at 20:05
  • @mk_sch Because after a function is finished, execution returns the the place where the function was called. That's how functions work.
    – khelwood
    Commented Jul 26, 2018 at 20:06
  • I still don't get the answer. I visualized the code in pythontutor.com but didn't help, either.
    – mk_sch
    Commented Jul 26, 2018 at 20:10
1

Let's run your code step by step -

def draw_interval(center_length):
    if center_length > 0: 
        print('first value: {}'.format(center_length))
        draw_interval(center_length - 1)      
        print('second value: {}'.format(center_length))              
draw_interval(3)

print('first value: {}'.format(center_length)) comes here, 
prints 3

draw_interval(center_length - 1) => draw_interval(2) called
1. print('second value: {}'.format(center_length)) stays in memory because draw_interval() called with 2

draw_interval(2)
print('first value: {}'.format(center_length)) comes here, 
prints 2
2. print('second value: {}'.format(center_length)) stays in memory because draw_interval() called with 1

draw_interval(1)
print('first value: {}'.format(center_length)) comes here, 
prints 1
3. print('second value: {}'.format(center_length)) stays in memory because draw_interval() called with 0

Condition gets false Unravels step 3, 2, 1 printing 1, 2, 3

Hope that makes sense

1
  • I had a hard time understanding numbers stayed in memory, when recursive function is called, not it's a bit more clear.
    – mk_sch
    Commented Jul 27, 2018 at 4:21
1

It seems like you expect the output to stop after the first three lines of output.

But although the if body is not executed the fourth time, the overall execution does not stop. There is still a call stack that is not empty. That particular function call (that did not execute the if block), returns to the execution context of the function that called it, which still has things to do. Namely, it should print "second value" ... and then also it returns to the place where it was called from, ...etc.

Note that when a function is called (maybe from within a function -- which could be the same function), the calling code will resume once that function returns. In your case the code returns within an if block of which the condition is not re-evaluated, as that was already done before. So even though center_length became 0, it does not affect where the calling code will proceed.

What's more, each function execution context has its own, separate center_length variable. So even if it is passed on as one less, this does not influence the value center_length has in the calling function. This fact does not influence the execution order in your case, but it may help to get grips on recursion.

0

This is the case because recursion creates nested functions and goes from top to bottom then comes back in the opposite order. Here is what I mean:

draw_interval(3):
    if 3 > 0:
        print('first: ', 3)
        if 2 > 0:
            print('first: ', 2)
            if 1 > 0:
                print('first: 1')
                if 0 > 0:            # this doesn't pass
                    print('first: 0') 
                    print('second: 0')
                print('second: 1')
            print('second: 2')
        print('second: 3')

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