104

Can I use the same counter variable for a for loop inside of a for loop?

Or will the variables affect each other? Should the following code use a different variable for the second loop, such as j, or is i fine?

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
  for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
  {
  }
}
  • 71
    It is confusing — it wouldn't get past me in a code review. But it is legitimate. There are two different variables both called i, with different scopes. Use -Wshadow with GCC to get such problems reported automatically. – Jonathan Leffler Jul 27 '18 at 0:26
  • 15
    I'm surprised that -Wshadow is not included in -Wall. – leftaroundabout Jul 27 '18 at 7:57
  • 5
    @leftaroundabout -Wshadow warns about shadowing of global variables as well, which could easily get annoying in larger projects. – Cubic Jul 27 '18 at 9:43
  • 9
    @leftaroundabout even more surprisingly, even -Wextra does not include -Wshadow. I guess it is common enough in some projects, or some gcc developer loves shadowing as a coding style, to warrant being left out like this. – hyde Jul 27 '18 at 10:34
  • 5
    @leftaroundabout Echoing what Cubic said, -Wshadow has a horrendous false positive rate, rendering it completely useless. Scope exists for a reason, and shadowing is a priori not problematic. Now -Wshadow-local (note: not -Wshadow=local) is very different. But unfortunately GCC has so far refused to include it in trunk (though there appear to be forks of GCC which do include it). – Konrad Rudolph Jul 27 '18 at 10:41

12 Answers 12

136

You may use the same name (identifier). It will be a different object. They will not affect each other. Inside the inner loop, there is no way to refer to the object used in the outer loop (unless you make special provisions for that, as by providing a pointer to it).

This is generally bad style, is prone to confusion, and should be avoided.

The objects are different only if the inner one is defined separately, as with the int i you have shown. If the same name is used without defining a new object, the loops will use the same object and will interfere with each other.

  • 3
    using for(i) and for(j) nested, and inside i++, will increase the outer-loop variable. However what you say is correct if you use the same identifier in both loops, because they are differently scoped variables. – KYL3R Jul 27 '18 at 11:28
  • 3
    @BloodGain: “Object” is a technical term used in the C standard. I used it deliberately here. – Eric Postpischil Jul 27 '18 at 21:27
  • 1
    @EricPostpischil: Ah, I see, yes. I was not aware of that definition in the standard, and was afraid it would be misleading to new programmers (as this is very clearly a beginner question), since C does not have "objects" in the sense that we generally use the term. I see it in the C11 standard, and now I'm curious if it was defined that way before C11. – Bloodgain Jul 27 '18 at 21:32
  • 1
    It was. It's 3.14 in the C99 standard, instead of 3.15. So no excuse on my part. That'll teach me to question you <:-| – Bloodgain Jul 27 '18 at 21:36
  • 1
    More generally: there's nothing to prevent you from re-using a variable name in any nested scope. Except, of course, the fear of God's Punishment for writing confusing code. – Isaac Rabinovitch Aug 2 '18 at 23:48
55

First, this is absolutely legal: the code will compile and run, repeating the body of the nested loop 10×10=100 times. Loop counter i inside the nested loop will hide the counter of the outer loop, so the two counters would be incremented independently of each other.

Since the outer i is hidden, the code inside the nested loop's body would have access only to the value of i of the nested loop, not i from the outer loop. In situations when the nested loop does not need access to the outer i such code could be perfectly justifiable. However, this is likely to create more confusion in its readers, so it's a good idea to avoid writing such code to avoid "maintenance liabilities."

Note: Even though the counter variables of both loops have the same identifier i, they remain two independent variables, i.e. you are not using the same variable in both loops. Using the same variable in both loops is also possible, but the code would be hard to read. Here is an example:

for (int i = 1 ; i < 100 ; i++) {
    for ( ; i % 10 != 0 ; i++) {
        printf("%02d ", i);
    }
    printf("%d\n", i);
}

Now both loops use the same variable. However, it takes a while to figure out what this code does without compiling it (demo);

  • 4
    Since the question is phrased as "using the same counter variable" I would also like to point out that the shadowing only takes place when the redefinition occurs. Omitting the int on the inner for loop, i.e. actually using the same counter variable, will cause the outer loop to only run once, as the inner loop will leave i == 10. This is trivial, but thought it provides clarification given how the question was stated – Easton Bornemeier Jul 27 '18 at 0:04
  • @EastonBornemeier You are right, I figured I should address the issue of "the same variable" in the body of the answer. Thank you! – dasblinkenlight Jul 27 '18 at 0:31
  • @EricPostpischil "Variable shadowing" is an official term, complete with its own page on wikipedia. I've updated the answer to be consistent with the wording of the standard, though. Thank you! – dasblinkenlight Jul 27 '18 at 0:39
  • 2
    @dasblinkenlight: Actually, I had a brain spasm about the direction, and the inner name does shadow the outer name. My previous comment was wrong in that regard. My apologies. (However, that is in an English sense, not in an official sense—Wikipedia is not an official publication for C or programming in general, and I am not aware of any office or authoritative body that defines the term.) The C standard uses “hide,” so that is preferable. – Eric Postpischil Jul 27 '18 at 1:07
  • Nice, especially with the "same variable" example. However, I think "the code will compile and run as expected" would be better as "the code will compile and run as someone who has read it carefully and understands all the ramifications expected" ... as you say, code like this "is likely to create more confusion in its readers" and the problem is a confused reader might expect something other than what it does. – TripeHound Jul 27 '18 at 9:54
25

You can. But you should be aware of the scope of the is. if we call the outer i with i_1 and the inner i with i_2, the scope of the is is as follows:

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
     // i means i_1
     for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
     {
        // i means i_2
     }
     // i means i_1
}

You should notice that they do not affect each other, and just their scope of definition is different.

16

That is completely possible but keep in mind, you wont be able to address the first declared i

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)//I MEAN THE ONE HERE
{

  for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {

    }
}

in the second loop within the second child loop

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{

  for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)//the new i
    {
        // i cant see the i thats before this new i here
    }
}

if you need to adjust or get the value of the first i, use j in the second loop

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{

  for(int j = 0; j < 10; j++)
    {

    }
}

and if your creative enough you can do both of them in one loop

for(int i ,j= 0; i < 10; (j>9) ? (i++,j=0) : 0 ,j++)
{
    printf("%d %d\n",i,j);
}
  • 5
    If I caught shadowed i variables in nested loops during a code review, I'd see it as a coaching opportunity. If I caught someone obfuscating the inner loop like your last example (that is NOT one loop), I might throw them out a window. – Bloodgain Jul 27 '18 at 21:21
  • it is one loop, it has only one for loop, if it was 2 it would have two for keywords or two while keywords or a for and while keywords – Dodo Jul 27 '18 at 23:00
  • 2
    That's why I said you obfuscated the loop. You're still looping, you've just hidden it with less obvious syntax. And it's worse in every way for it. – Bloodgain Jul 28 '18 at 0:53
12

Yes you can use the same counter variable name for an inner for loop as for the outer for loop.

From for loop:

for ( init_clause ; cond_expression ; iteration_expression ) loop_statement
The expression statement used as loop_statement establishes its own block scope, distinct from the scope of init_clause.

for (int i = 0; ; ) {
    long i = 1;   // valid C, invalid C++
    // ...
}  

The scope of loop_statement is nested within the scope of init_clause.

From C Standards#6.8.5p5 Iteration statements [emphasis mine]

An iteration statement is a block whose scope is a strict subset of the scope of its enclosing block. The loop body is also a block whose scope is a strict subset of the scope of the iteration statement.

From C Standards#6.2.1p4 Scopes of identifiers [emphasis mine]

....Within the inner scope, the identifier designates the entity declared in the inner scope; the entity declared in the outer scope is hidden (and not visible) within the inner scope.

9

From a code / compiler perspective this would be a perfectly valid and legal thing to do. The int i declared in the inner for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++) loop is in a new and smaller scope, so that declaration shadows the declaration of int i in the outer loop (or, with other words: In the inner scope all accesses to the variable i go to the int i declared in the inner scope, leaving the int i in the outer scope untouched).

That said, from a code quality perspective this is utterly horrible. It is hard to read, hard to understand and easy to misunderstand. Don't do it.

8

Yes, you can use it but it's quite confusing. The most important thing is the scope of local variable inside the loop. As far if a variable is declared inside a function, the scope of that variable is that function.

int a = 5;
// scope of a that has value 5
int func(){
    int a = 10;
   // scope of a that has value 10
}
// scope of a that has value 5

Similarly the case with loops, variable declared inside the inner loop have different scope and variable declared outer loop has different scope.

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++){
    // In first iteration, value of i is 0

    for(int i = 1; i < 10; i++){
        // In first iteration, value of i is 1
    }
    // In first iteration, value of i is 0
}

The better approach is to use different variables for inner and outer loops.

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++){

    for(int j = 1; j < 10; j++){

    }

}
8

Yes definitely you can use same name variable.

C programming variables can be declared in three places:
local variables:-Inside a function or a block.
Global variables:-Out of all functions.
Formal parameters:-In the function parameters.

But in your case i scope will have to mind below things

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
     // i means 1st for loop variable
     for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
     {
        // but here i means 2nd for loop  variable
     }
     //interesting thing here i means 1st for loop variable
}

Note:It would be best practice to use different variables for inner and outer loops

6

Yes - and even more interestingly you can reuse a variable name each time you open a set of braces. This is often handy when inserting diagnostic code. Type an open brace '{' followed by declaration and use of variables, then close the brace and the variables go away. This guarantees that you will not interfere with anything in the main body while still retaining the advantage of any variables, classes and methods declared outside the braces.

3

Scope Rule: A variable declared in a for statement can only be used in that statement and the body of the loop.

If in your code you have defined multiple instances of i in inner loops each instance will occupy its own memory space. So there is nothing to worry about the results anyway it would be the same.

int main(void) {

    int i = 2; //defined with file global scope outside of a function and will remain 2
    if(1)
    {       //new scope, variables created here with same name are different
        int i = 5;//will remain == 5
        for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {   //new scope for "i"

            printf("i value in first loop: %d \n", i); // Will print 0 in first iteration
            for(int i = 8; i < 15; i++) 
            {   //new scope again for "i", variable with same name is not the same
                printf("i value in nested loop: %d \n", i); // Will print 8 in first iteration
            }
        }

    }

    return 0;
}

But it is not recommended to use the same variable name since it is difficult to understand and it becomes non-maintainable code later.

1

The important part is that the inner loop parameter contains int i. Because i is redefined this way, the two variables do not affect each other; their scopes are different. Here are two examples to show this:

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++) // This code will print "Test" 100 times
{
 for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
 {
  puts("Test");
 }
}

Note that the code above includes int i in the inner loop parameter, and the code below only includes i.

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++) // This code will print "Test" 10 times
{
 for(i = 0; i < 10; i++)
 {
  puts("Test");
 }
}
0

Well, you can do this without your scripts having a problem, but you should avoid that structure. It usually leads to confusion

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