70

How does one reliably determine a file's type? File extension analysis is not acceptable. There must be a rubyesque tool similar to the UNIX file(1) command?

This is regarding MIME or content type, not file system classifications, such as directory, file, or socket.

13 Answers 13

58

There is a ruby binding to libmagic that does what you need. It is available as a gem named ruby-filemagic:

gem install ruby-filemagic

Require libmagic-dev.

The documentation seems a little thin, but this should get you started:

$ irb 
irb(main):001:0> require 'filemagic' 
=> true
irb(main):002:0> fm = FileMagic.new
=> #<FileMagic:0x7fd4afb0>
irb(main):003:0> fm.file('foo.zip') 
=> "Zip archive data, at least v2.0 to extract"
irb(main):004:0> 
34

If you're on a Unix machine try this:

mimetype = `file -Ib #{path}`.gsub(/\n/,"")

I'm not aware of any pure Ruby solutions that work as reliably as 'file'.

Edited to add: depending what OS you are running you may need to use 'i' instead of 'I' to get file to return a mime-type.

  • 17
    To prevent nasty hackery, try using popen: IO.popen(["file", "--brief", "--mime-type", path], in: :close, err: :close).read.chomp – sj26 May 22 '12 at 2:11
  • Yup, this or the cocaine gem. – maletor Feb 10 '14 at 21:44
  • 7
    @sj26 Each time I call popen, I get a zombie process because the IO object is not closed. To fix that, use a block: IO.popen(["file", "--brief", "--mime-type", path], in: :close, err: :close) { |io| io.read.chomp } – Andrew Apr 17 '14 at 21:31
  • 1
    @Pete interpolating potentially user supplied content into a command string like backticks is a potential security vulnerability. Using popen with an array of arguments prevents this category of exploit. :-) – sj26 May 7 '16 at 2:48
  • 1
    Excellent point about zombies! IO.popen(["file", "--brief", "--mime-type", path], &:read).chomp works, too. – sj26 May 7 '16 at 2:50
13

I found shelling out to be the most reliable. For compatibility on both Mac OS X and Ubuntu Linux I used:

file --mime -b myvideo.mp4
video/mp4; charset=binary

Ubuntu also prints video codec information if it can which is pretty cool:

file -b myvideo.mp4
ISO Media, MPEG v4 system, version 2

  • 5
    should be file -b --mime-type myvideo.mp4 for web usage – Yam Marcovic Oct 3 '12 at 10:22
8

You can use this reliable method base on the magic header of the file :

def get_image_extension(local_file_path)
  png = Regexp.new("\x89PNG".force_encoding("binary"))
  jpg = Regexp.new("\xff\xd8\xff\xe0\x00\x10JFIF".force_encoding("binary"))
  jpg2 = Regexp.new("\xff\xd8\xff\xe1(.*){2}Exif".force_encoding("binary"))
  case IO.read(local_file_path, 10)
  when /^GIF8/
    'gif'
  when /^#{png}/
    'png'
  when /^#{jpg}/
    'jpg'
  when /^#{jpg2}/
    'jpg'
  else
    mime_type = `file #{local_file_path} --mime-type`.gsub("\n", '') # Works on linux and mac
    raise UnprocessableEntity, "unknown file type" if !mime_type
    mime_type.split(':')[1].split('/')[1].gsub('x-', '').gsub(/jpeg/, 'jpg').gsub(/text/, 'txt').gsub(/x-/, '')
  end  
end
  • You also need to look for "\xff\xd8\xff\xdb" as a JPEG signature. – Richard Fairhurst Dec 3 '18 at 11:59
5

If you're using the File class, you can augment it with the following functions based on @PatrickRichie's answer:

class File
    def mime_type
        `file --brief --mime-type #{self.path}`.strip
    end

    def charset
        `file --brief --mime #{self.path}`.split(';').second.split('=').second.strip
    end
end

And, if you're using Ruby on Rails, you can drop this into config/initializers/file.rb and have available throughout your project.

2

You could give shared-mime a try (gem install shared-mime-info). Requires the use ofthe Freedesktop shared-mime-info library, but does both filename/extension checks as well as "magic" checks... tried giving it a whirl myself just now but I don't have the freedesktop shared-mime-info database installed and have to do "real work," unfortunately, but it might be what you're looking for.

2

For those who came here by the search engine, a modern approach to find the MimeType in pure ruby is to use the mimemagic gem.

require 'mimemagic'

MimeMagic.by_magic(File.open('tux.jpg')).type # => "image/jpeg" 

If you feel that is safe to use only the file extension, then you can use the mime-types gem:

MIME::Types.type_for('tux.jpg') => [#<MIME::Type: image/jpeg>]
1

Pure Ruby solution using magic bytes and returning a symbol for the matching type:

https://github.com/SixArm/sixarm_ruby_magic_number_type

I wrote it, so if you have suggestions, let me know.

  • The docs you link to in the readme is a broken link. – mindeavor Aug 3 '12 at 5:26
1

I recently found mimetype-fu.

It seems to be the easiest reliable solution to get a file's MIME type.

The only caveat is that on a Windows machine it only uses the file extension, whereas on *Nix based systems it works great.

0

The best I found so far:

http://bogomips.org/mahoro.git/

0

This was added as a comment on this answer but should really be its own answer:

path = # path to your file

IO.popen(
  ["file", "--brief", "--mime-type", path],
  in: :close, err: :close
) { |io| io.read.chomp }

I can confirm that it worked for me.

-1

The ruby gem is well. mime-types for ruby

  • This gem uses file extention to determine the type, not the content. – Lars Haugseth Sep 11 '09 at 15:13
  • Thanks for your response. This method is not a good idea. – Qianjigui Sep 14 '09 at 3:15
-2

You could give a go with MIME::Types for Ruby.

This library allows for the identification of a file’s likely MIME content type. The identification of MIME content type is based on a file’s filename extensions.

  • 6
    From Readme.txt: "The identification of MIME content type is based on a file‘s filename extensions". OP explicitly requested a method based on content analysis, not filename extension. – Martin Carpenter May 23 '09 at 14:37

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