1

I have some query of ids such as ids={1000,50,300,40} I whant to select some items with that ids from db table and I want to save the sequence of items accordind to the sequence of ids. I mean, i use select statment:

SELECT * 
  FROM items 
 WHERE id IN (1000,50,300,40)

And I would like to get result as

id      name
-------------
1000   item1
50     item2
300    item3
40     item4

But SQL returns result as

id      name 
-------------
40     item4 
50     item2 
300    item3 
1000   item1

It is very important to save the order of ids. Can anybody help me?

1
  • To be honest, I'd seriously question the importance of this requirement without knowing any further details. Retaining the order of the requested IDs may just be a symptom of a more general design issue. Just my two cents... – Martin Klinke Mar 1 '11 at 16:58
5

Assuming SQL Server 2000+, use a CASE expression:

  SELECT i.* 
    FROM ITEMS i
   WHERE i.id IN (1000,50,300,40)
ORDER BY CASE i.id
           WHEN 1000 THEN 1
           WHEN 50 THEN 2
           WHEN 300 THEN 3
           WHEN 40 THEN 4
           ELSE 5
         END 
4
  • In facts I have more than 4 ids in "in" statment and I don't know the values of ids a priori. – Kate Mar 1 '11 at 17:05
  • 1
    @Kate: Sorry, SQL is declarative -- no dynamic/implicit/natural sorting available. Dynamic ORDER BY requires dynamic SQL... – OMG Ponies Mar 1 '11 at 17:09
  • 1
    @OMG - It doesn't require dynamic SQL in this instance. a join on a table variable or similar containining mappings of id and order by would do the job. – Martin Smith Mar 1 '11 at 17:49
  • @Kate: Because I answered the posted question, not the updated details only seen if reading comments. Why you don't explain the dynamic ordering requirement in the original question is beyond me. – OMG Ponies Mar 2 '11 at 15:53
4

You also have the issue of how to parameterise the in clause. If you are on SQL Server 2008 you can use Table Valued Parameters. You could use a 2 column TVP with both an order by column and a value column then join onto that.

For previous versions you can use a split Table Valued Function that returns 2 columns (index and value) and join onto that.

SELECT i.*    
FROM dbo.split('1000,50,300,40') s
JOIN items i ON i.id = s.value
ORDER BY s.idx

An example of such a function is here. I am in no way endorsing that particular implementation as there are probably far better ones about but you can use it to see the general approach.

2
  • 2
    I'm sure you meant ORDER BY s.index. – Andriy M Mar 2 '11 at 12:59
  • @Andriy - Yes I did. Thanks for letting me know. – Martin Smith Mar 2 '11 at 13:02
1

Only thing I can think of is to develop or discover some other column that will return objects in the proper order, or UNION a series of queries by individual ID which will cause each query result to be appended, in order, to all the previous result sets.

The reason this is happening is that the SQL engine is performing an index or table scan to find the records, and as records are generally stored in order of their IDs, that's the default order it will find them and add them to the result set.

3
  • Yes it is what i want, but I don't know how to add some column to my result and how to generate some numbers for that column! – Kate Mar 1 '11 at 17:08
  • 1
    You can TRY including @@RowNum or @@Identity in your select list. If there is ever a stage where the SQL engine is pulling records based solely on the IN clause order, and it's just reordering the result set to index order, you might be able to override the re-ordering by keeping track of the order in which the results were put into the result set. – KeithS Mar 1 '11 at 17:17
  • ... However, I doubt you can do this. I think the most foolproof way would be to search for the records individually in a series of UNIONed statements, or keep track of the IDs' order in your native code, and after you slurp the results into in-memory objects, place them in a collection in the same order. – KeithS Mar 1 '11 at 17:19
-2

use

select * from items WHERE id IN (1000,50,300,40) order by id desc
1
  • That is simply the opposite order of what the OP didn't want. He wants the order to be 1000, 50, 300, 40, not 1000, 300, 50, 40. – Mark Sowul Mar 2 '11 at 3:38
-4

Add an ORDER BY clause to the query with ASC or DESC for ascending or descending order respectively.

select * from items where id in (1000,50,300,40) order by id
1
  • This will not produce the order of the ids in the where-clause as requested but rather the natural order of the ids which is exactly what the OP did not ask for. – Martin Klinke Mar 1 '11 at 16:54

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