94

Is there a collection in C# that will not let you add duplicate items to it? For example, with the silly class of

public class Customer {
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string Address { get; set; }

    public override int GetHashCode() {
        return (FirstName + LastName + Address).GetHashCode();
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj) {
        Customer C = obj as Customer;
        return C != null && String.Equals(this.FirstName, C.FirstName) && String.Equals(this.LastName, C.LastName) && String.Equals(this.Address, C.Address);
    }
}

The following code will (obviously) throw an exception:

Customer Adam = new Customer { Address = "A", FirstName = "Adam", LastName = "" };
Customer AdamDup = new Customer { Address = "A", FirstName = "Adam", LastName = "" };

Dictionary<Customer, bool> CustomerHash = new Dictionary<Customer, bool>();
CustomerHash.Add(Adam, true);
CustomerHash.Add(AdamDup, true);

But is there a class that will similarly guarantee uniqueness, but without KeyValuePairs? I thought HashSet<T> would do that, but having read the docs it seems that class is just a set implementation (go figure).

  • 3
    I don't understand your problem with HashSet<T>. MSDN says "The HashSet<T> class provides high-performance set operations. A set is a collection that contains no duplicate elements, and whose elements are in no particular order." – Daniel Hilgarth Mar 1 '11 at 17:11
  • 4
    Can you explain more why HashSet<T> is insufficient? – JaredPar Mar 1 '11 at 17:11
  • @mootinator: The Dictionary<K,V> class does not guarantee any kind of order. – LukeH Mar 1 '11 at 17:23
  • 3
    I guess he just wants to throw an exception when you try to add an existing value... To do this, just check the bool value returned from HashSet<T>.Add method and throw when false... – digEmAll Mar 1 '11 at 17:24
  • 2
    It's also strongly recommende to only overload those for immutable types only. A mutable Customer would usually fair better with the default Reference-equality. – Henk Holterman Mar 1 '11 at 18:59
185

HashSet<T> is what you're looking for. From MSDN (emphasis added):

The HashSet<T> class provides high-performance set operations. A set is a collection that contains no duplicate elements, and whose elements are in no particular order.

Note that the HashSet<T>.Add(T item) method returns a bool -- true if the item was added to the collection; false if the item was already present.

  • 5
    T item in this case should implement IEquatable interface. If class does not inherit this interface, HashSet<T> adds duplicate elements. – Rudolf Dvoracek Oct 15 '18 at 11:04
  • Or instead of the item implementing IEquatable, you can pass a (custom) implementation of EqualityComparer<T> instance to the HashSet<T> constructor. – Sipke Schoorstra Jun 20 at 19:52
17

How about just an extension method on HashSet?

public static void AddOrThrow<T>(this HashSet<T> hash, T item)
{
    if (!hash.Add(item))
        throw new ValueExistingException();
}
13

From the HashSet<T> page on MSDN:

The HashSet(Of T) class provides high-performance set operations. A set is a collection that contains no duplicate elements, and whose elements are in no particular order.

(emphasis mine)

4

If all you need is to ensure uniqueness of elements, then HashSet is what you need.

What do you mean when you say "just a set implementation"? A set is (by definition) a collection of unique elements that doesn't save element order.

  • You're completely right; the question was kind of stupid. Basically, I was looking for something that would throw an exception when a duplicate was added (like Dictionary<TKey, TValue>), but as already mentioned, HashSet<T> returns false on a duplicate add. +1, thank you. – Adam Rackis Mar 1 '11 at 18:59
3

You can try HashSet<T>

2

Just to add my 2 cents...

if you need a ValueExistingException-throwing HashSet<T> you can also create your collection easily:

public class ThrowingHashSet<T> : ICollection<T>
{
    private HashSet<T> innerHash = new HashSet<T>();

    public void Add(T item)
    {
        if (!innerHash.Add(item))
            throw new ValueExistingException();
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        innerHash.Clear();
    }

    public bool Contains(T item)
    {
        return innerHash.Contains(item);
    }

    public void CopyTo(T[] array, int arrayIndex)
    {
        innerHash.CopyTo(array, arrayIndex);
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get { return innerHash.Count; }
    }

    public bool IsReadOnly
    {
        get { return false; }
    }

    public bool Remove(T item)
    {
        return innerHash.Remove(item);
    }

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return innerHash.GetEnumerator();
    }

    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.GetEnumerator();
    }
}

this can be useful for example if you need it in many places...

  • Sure. I was wondering if anything was built-in, but thank you +1 – Adam Rackis Mar 1 '11 at 19:05
0

You may look into something kind of Unique List as follows

public class UniqueList<T>
{
    public List<T> List
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }
    List<T> _internalList;

    public static UniqueList<T> NewList
    {
        get
        {
            return new UniqueList<T>();
        }
    }

    private UniqueList()
    {            
        _internalList = new List<T>();
        List = new List<T>();
    }

    public void Add(T value)
    {
        List.Clear();
        _internalList.Add(value);
        List.AddRange(_internalList.Distinct());
        //return List;
    }

    public void Add(params T[] values)
    {
        List.Clear();
        _internalList.AddRange(values);
        List.AddRange(_internalList.Distinct());
       // return List;
    }

    public bool Has(T value)
    {
        return List.Contains(value);
    }
}

and you can use it like follows

var uniquelist = UniqueList<string>.NewList;
uniquelist.Add("abc","def","ghi","jkl","mno");
uniquelist.Add("abc","jkl");
var _myList = uniquelist.List;

will only return "abc","def","ghi","jkl","mno" always even when duplicates are added to it

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