69

In Python, how do I get a datetime object for '3 years ago today'?

UPDATE: FWIW, I don't care hugely about accuracy... i.e. it's Feb 29th today, I don't care whether I'm given Feb 28th or March 1st in my answer. Concision is more important than configurability, in this case.

6
  • possible duplicate of How to create a DateTime equal to 15 minutes ago? – Marc B Mar 1 '11 at 17:40
  • 3
    Presumably if it's March 1 today, you want to get March 1 no matter if a leap year occurs in between or not? I think all the existing answers fail in that regard. – Mark Ransom Mar 1 '11 at 17:52
  • Almost, but not quite: the difference between 15 minutes, which is invariable, and 3 years, which is not, is significant. – JasonFruit Mar 1 '11 at 17:53
  • @Jason I agree with you, although from the OP's edit he doesn't seem super concerned about that, so that being the case it would be a duplicate. – Davy8 Mar 1 '11 at 17:58
  • 3
    This site really needs a way for the community to override when people accept a clearly incorrect answer. 3*365 days is not 3 years, and there's a correct answer right there. – Glenn Maynard Mar 1 '11 at 18:19
96
import datetime
datetime.datetime.now() - datetime.timedelta(days=3*365)
7
  • 42
    AP257 said: "I don't care hugely about accuracy". I interpreted as "I don't care about leap years" – Fábio Diniz Mar 1 '11 at 18:42
  • 5
    @Diniz: You interpreted it as "I want to be wrong". It's so easy to do this right, it's just plain silly to do it wrong--and it's bizarre to accept this answer when a correct one is available. – Glenn Maynard Mar 1 '11 at 19:50
  • 6
    Is it correct to give a less concise but more accurate answer when the asker explicitly told the opposite? – Fábio Diniz Mar 1 '11 at 20:16
  • 8
    +1 For simplicity. Maybe the OP just wanted an example of how to do something like this in general. – Chris Dutrow Mar 20 '12 at 20:00
  • Thanks for simplicity. I also don't care about accuracy. I was actually looking for a difference of days anyway. – VertigoRay May 14 '16 at 17:10
142

If you need to be exact use the dateutil module to calculate relative dates

from datetime import datetime
from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta

three_yrs_ago = datetime.now() - relativedelta(years=3)
0
27

Subtracting 365*3 days is wrong, of course--you're crossing a leap year more than half the time.

dt = datetime.now()
dt = dt.replace(year=dt.year-3)
# datetime.datetime(2008, 3, 1, 13, 2, 36, 274276)

ED: To get the leap-year issue right,

def subtract_years(dt, years):
    try:
        dt = dt.replace(year=dt.year-years)
    except ValueError:
        dt = dt.replace(year=dt.year-years, day=dt.day-1)
    return dt
4
  • 1
    Well, now you have that other issue: datetime.datetime(2008,2,29).replace(year=2005) -> ValueError. It is still more accurate to catch that error and just subtract one extra day I guess. – Jochen Ritzel Mar 1 '11 at 18:10
  • I keep forgetting about replace. It makes for a simpler solution than mine. – Mark Ransom Mar 1 '11 at 18:41
  • @Mark: I did at first, too; I initially did what you did. The site seems to have misplaced that version in the edit history, though. – Glenn Maynard Mar 1 '11 at 19:50
  • What happens after 2100? – PartialOrder Oct 30 '13 at 19:38
4
def add_years(dt, years):
    try:
        result = datetime.datetime(dt.year + years, dt.month, dt.day, dt.hour, dt.minute, dt.second, dt.microsecond, dt.tzinfo)
    except ValueError:
        result = datetime.datetime(dt.year + years, dt.month, dt.day - 1, dt.hour, dt.minute, dt.second, dt.microsecond, dt.tzinfo)
    return result

>>> add_years(datetime.datetime.now(), -3)
datetime.datetime(2008, 3, 1, 12, 2, 35, 22000)
>>> add_years(datetime.datetime(2008, 2, 29), -3)
datetime.datetime(2005, 2, 28, 0, 0)
2

Although the answer using dateutil is good, an alternative is using the pendulum package on PyPI. For more info, refer to its docs.

>>> import pendulum
>>> dt = pendulum.now().subtract(years=3)
>>> dt
DateTime(2015, 10, 5, 17, 44, 41, 82598, tzinfo=Timezone('America/New_York'))
>>> type(dt)
pendulum.datetime.DateTime

If you'll be needing the current datetime for further use, you should probably first save pendulum.now() to a variable, and then use the variable!

If you really want to avoid the timezone, use .naive().

You shouldn't need to convert the result to a native Python object, but if you really need to, one way to do it is:

>>> import datetime
>>> pydt = datetime.datetime.fromisoformat(dt.isoformat())
>>> pydt
datetime.datetime(2015, 10, 5, 17, 44, 41, 82598, tzinfo=datetime.timezone(datetime.timedelta(days=-1, seconds=72000)))
>>> type(pydt)
datetime.datetime
1

Don't see this and it's super easy and concise,

In [1]: import datetime

In [2]: dt = datetime.datetime.today()

In [3]: datetime.datetime(year=dt.year-3, month=dt.month, day=dt.day)
Out[3]: datetime.datetime(2016, 4, 11, 0, 0)

Caveat is that it'll raise an error on February 29th.

-1
In [3]: import datetime as dt

In [4]: today=dt.date.today()

In [5]: three_years_ago=today-dt.timedelta(days=3*365)

In [6]: three_years_ago
Out[6]: datetime.date(2008, 3, 1)
-1

Why not simply do a check for leap year before replacing the year. This does not need any extra package or try:Except.

def years_ago(dt, years):
    if dt.month == 2 and dt.day == 29:
        dt = dt.replace(day=28)

    return dt.replace(year=dt.year - years)

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