10

Let's say I want to do the following:

val (k, v) = pair.split("=".toRegex(), 2)

This code is fine if I always get 2 components from the split - however, if the delimiter is not present in the string, this code throws an exception, because the second element in the array isn't present.

The answer is almost certainly "no", but is there some way to coerce destructure to assign null values to missing components?

4 Answers 4

9

When destructuring objects, Kotlin calls componentN() for that object. For arrays, component1() is equal to get(0), component2() is equal to get(1), and so on.

So if the index is out of bounds, it'll throw ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException, instead of returning null.


But you can make your operator function like this:

operator fun <T> Array<out T>.component1(): T? = if (size > 0) get(0) else null
operator fun <T> Array<out T>.component2(): T? = if (size > 1) get(1) else null

so if I run

val (k, v) = arrayOf(1)

println(k)
println(v)

the output will be

1
null

See:

1
  • 1
    Great solution - although in this particular case, it's List<> that needs the extension (split returns a List<>).
    – Melllvar
    Jul 30, 2018 at 5:41
3

You could add your own extension to List that adds the required number of null values to the end:

val (k, v) = pair.split("=".toRegex(), 2).padWithNulls(limit = 2)

Implementation can be done a couple of ways, here's just one:

private inline fun <reified E> List<E>.padWithNulls(limit: Int): List<E?> {
    if (this.size >= limit) {
        return this
    }

    val result: MutableList<E?> = this.toMutableList()
    result.addAll(arrayOfNulls(limit - this.size))
    return result
}

Here's a simpler one as well:

private fun <E> List<E>.padWithNulls(limit: Int): List<E?> {
    val result: MutableList<E?> = this.toMutableList()

    while (result.size < limit) {
        result.add(null)
    }

    return result
}

Or wrapping this functionality even further:

val (k, v) = pair.splitAndPadWithNulls("=".toRegex(), 2)

private fun String.splitAndPadWithNulls(regex: Regex, limit: Int): List<String?> {
    return this.split(regex, limit).padWithNulls(limit)
}
0

Its working for me

val pair="your string"
if(pair.isNotEmpty()&&pair.contains("=")) {
    val (k, v) = pair.split("=".toRegex(), 2)
    println(k)
    println(v)
}
1
  • 3
    Of course it'll work if you test for presence of the delimiter :). If I go that route, I might as well just save the effort, do the split, check for the size of the array, then destructure it. My question is, is there a way to do this if there may be less than expected number of components - without additional tests?
    – Melllvar
    Jul 30, 2018 at 5:27
0

It doesn't cover as many cases as other answers (also might not be as obvious what's happening) but you can always force there to be at least the correct number of values to destructure (extra values will be ignored). Using your example you can just add null to increase the size of the list returned by split:

val (k, v) = "foo=bar".split("=".toRegex(), 2) + null
> k=foo, v=bar

val (k, v) = "foo".split("=".toRegex(), 2) + null
> k=foo, v=null

Playground example https://pl.kotl.in/W7gGYyAjC

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.