5

I have a .Net Core project that registers a number of Singletons as follows:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddMemoryCache();
    services.AddLogging();

    services.AddSingleton<IConfiguration>(Configuration);
    services.AddSingleton<IDbFactory, DefaultDbFactory>();
    services.AddSingleton<IUserRepository, UserRepository>();    
    services.AddSingleton<IEmailService, EmailService>();          
    services.AddSingleton<IHostedService, BackgroundService>();
    services.AddSingleton<ISettingsRepository, SettingsRepository>();
    services.AddSingleton(typeof(TokenManager));

    var sp = services.BuildServiceProvider();
    var userRepository = sp.GetService<IUserRepository>();
    // ...
}

This is the only place these classes are registered, and no other instances are created anywhere, however I have noticed that the constructors are called twice. Why is that?

2
  • Why do you need a user repository before the services are configured? You should be able to inject an IServiceProvider into a later method and do it there.
    – nvoigt
    Jul 30, 2018 at 11:23
  • @nvoigt good question which probably deserves another SO question. The reason is that I'm adding framework services below this which include a custom Role based authorization filter, which is constructed with the user repository. This doesn't feel right to me as it creates a hard dependency, however it's not the point of this question and answer.
    – pcdev
    Jul 31, 2018 at 1:49

1 Answer 1

5

TL;DR - If you need one of your registered singletons to be passed in as a configuration option to AddMvc, Don't do what I did and use GetService in the ConfigureServices method. Skip down to EDIT 2 below.

I found this answer to a similar question but the answer wasn't clear about the order with respect to the service registration, however it did point out that calling services.BuildServiceProvider() builds a new container which causes the services to be reregistered. Kind of makes sense in hindsight...

EDIT:

My original fix was to move services.BuildServiceProvider() before the AddSingleton registrations, however it turns out this doesn't always work, as Buddha Buddy pointed out.

I've just seen this question which gives a lot more detail into what's happening. The original registrations are not discarded, as I thought they were. I was thinking about it all wrong.

Calling services.BuildServiceProvider() does build a new service provider/container, but this has nothing to do with registrations. The class implementing IUserRepository and all dependent services are instantiated by the new service provider when sp.GetService<IUserRepository>() is called, but the original IServiceProvider remains, and that's what the rest of the application will use.

So down the line when the application requires an instance of IUserRepository (say because it's an injected dependency of UsersController, which has now been requested), the IUserRepository service (and its dependencies, if any) are again instantiated, because it's now under the original IServiceProvider.

A comment in the answer to the question above states that you can prevent this and use the one IServiceProvider, "by returning the service provider instance from the ConfigureServices method so that will be the container your application uses as well". I'm not sure how you would do that short of storing a class variable pointing to it, so it can be swapped out in the Configure method by setting app.ApplicationServices - but that doesn't work for me either, because the new service provider is missing all the MVC services.

Some people recommend using the app.ApplicationServices in Configure() to access the required service instead, but that won't work for me as I need to use it in ConfigureServices as follows:

//...

serviceProvider = services.BuildServiceProvider();
var userRepository = serviceProvider.GetService<IUserRepository>();

// Add framework services
services.AddMvc(

    config =>
    {
        var policy = new AuthorizationPolicyBuilder()
                        .RequireAuthenticatedUser()
                        .Build();
        config.Filters.Add(new RolesAuthorizationFilter(userRepository));
    });

EDIT 2:

Found the solution! This brilliant post described what I was trying to achieve and presented a very tidy solution.

If you need to pass a reference to one of your registered singletons in as MVC configuration options, rather than try and instantiate it inside ConfigureServices, you can simply create a new class that implements IConfigureOptions<MvcOptions> which can take injected dependencies, register this class as a singleton - and everything else is taken care of - brilliant!

Example:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddMemoryCache();
    services.AddLogging();

    services.AddSingleton<IConfiguration>(Configuration);
    services.AddSingleton<IDbFactory, DefaultDbFactory>();
    services.AddSingleton<IUserRepository, UserRepository>();    
    services.AddSingleton<IEmailService, EmailService>();          
    services.AddSingleton<IHostedService, BackgroundService>();
    services.AddSingleton<ISettingsRepository, SettingsRepository>();
    services.AddSingleton(typeof(TokenManager));

    // var sp = services.BuildServiceProvider(); // NO NEED for this after all
    // var userRepository = sp.GetService<IUserRepository>();

    services.AddMvc(); // No config options required any more
    services.AddSingleton<IConfigureOptions<MvcOptions>, ConfigureMvcOptions>();  // Here be the magic...

    // ...
}

Then create the new class:

public class ConfigureMvcOptions : IConfigureOptions<MvcOptions>
{
    private readonly IUserRepository userRepository;
    public ConfigureMvcOptions(IUserRepository userRepository)
    {
        this.userRepository = userRepository;
    }

    public void Configure(MvcOptions options)
    {
        var policy = new AuthorizationPolicyBuilder()
                    .RequireAuthenticatedUser()
                    .Build();
        options.Filters.Add(new RolesAuthorizationFilter(userRepository));
    }
}

Thanks to the magic of DI, everything else is taken care of. My user repository singleton and its dependencies are only instantiated once.

1
  • 2
    Moving the BuildServiceProvider to before registering didn't work for me. I got a "No service for type 'IMySingleton' has been registered.' exception. Instead, I moved the singleton initialization to Startup.Configure() by using app.ApplicationServices.GetRequiredService<IMySingleton>(), and now I don't have multiple instances of my singleton created. In my case, I have a long running action that needs to start immediately, not waiting for someone to call my service, and I want the service to be unavailable until this process is finished. Aug 10, 2018 at 1:16

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