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I am trying to configure my dotnet core project (in Windows) as "case sensitive", so it behaves as in my production server (linux).

I have found this way of doing it:

fsutil.exe file setCaseSensitiveInfo "C:\my folder" enable

The problem is that this function is not recursive:

The case sensitivity flag only affects the specific folder to which you apply it. It isn’t automatically inherited by that folder’s subfolders.

So I am trying to build a powershell script that applies this to all folders and subfolders, recursively.

I have tried googling something similar and just modifying the command line, but I don't seem to find the corrent keywords. This is the closest that I've gotten to this sort of example.

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    (gci -Recurse -Directory).FullName | % {fsutil.exe file setCaseSensitiveInfo $_ enable} (don't have Windows 10 to test it) – robdy Jul 30 '18 at 10:20
  • @robdy This is the correct answer. Thanks. It answers with "setCaseSensitiveInfo is an invalid parameter", but this is Window7's fault ... I tested your script with (gci -Recurse -Directory).FullName | % {echo $_} and it works like a charm. – Xavier Peña Jul 30 '18 at 11:39
  • Glad to hear that. Will add the answer in a second! – robdy Jul 30 '18 at 11:40
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Correct code:

(Get-ChildItem -Recurse -Directory).FullName | ForEach-Object {fsutil.exe file setCaseSensitiveInfo $_ enable}

Explanation:

Get-ChildItem -Recurse -Directory will give you list of all folders (recursively).

As you want to pass their full path, you can access it by using .FullName (or more self-explanatory | Select-Object -ExpandProperty FullName ).

Then you use ForEach-Object to run fsutil.exe multiple times. Current file's FullName can be accessed using $_ (this represents current object in ForEach-Object).

  • first cd to the root of the directory tree that needs to become case sensitive. – Abhishek Anand Apr 10 at 13:07
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With Cygwin and bash shell, you can do this:

$ find $THEDIR -type d -exec fsutil file setCaseSensitiveInfo "{}" enable \;

It appears that Windows handles the '/' characters output by the find command just fine.

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(Get-ChildItem -Recurse -Directory).FullName | ForEach-Object {if (-Not ($_ -like '*node_modules*')) { fsutil.exe file setCaseSensitiveInfo $_ enable } }

I modified @robdy's code to allow excluding node_modules. You can replace the "node_modules" bit in the above with anything to exclude filepaths containing it.

If you're working with npm, you probably want to exclude node_modules. @robdy's answer is great, but was taking minutes at a time iterating over every single node package folder even if I didn't have the package installed; given that this is something one might want to run fairly often since directories might be added all the time, and since you probably aren't modifying anything in node_modules, excluding it seems reasonable.

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