4

I have written the following to animate the text in a div, but I cannot find how does the last character gets printed repeatedly.

var textClass = $(".first-text");
var text = textClass.text();
textClass.text("");
for (var i in text) {
  $(textClass).animate({
    opacity: 0.25
  }, 200, function() {
    $(textClass).append(text.charAt(i));
  });
}
p:not(:first-child) {
  display: none;
}

p {
  margin: 0 auto;
  font-size: 24px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div class="animate-text">
  <p class="first-text">HTML</p><br>
</div>

If I try to the alert the value of i or text.charAt(i), I always get the desired output, but when I try to append the same in a div, I always get the same last letter that is printed repeatedly. I cannot find where I am mistaken. I cannot the find the bug in my logic.

If anyone could enlighten me on my mistake in the above code, I would be glad to hear it.

Here is the link to my fiddle where I tried this code.

Thanks in advance.

  • You need to make a closure – mplungjan Jul 30 '18 at 11:11
  • 1
    Switching var i in text to const i in text solves the problem. Then it becomes a scoped variable and not global as it dose with var – Endless Jul 30 '18 at 11:12
  • Thanks @Endless for the above fix, it worked (Y) – Code_Ninja Jul 30 '18 at 11:19
8

You've stumbled into a bit of learning when it comes to closures. When i loops through, and eventually gets run inside the function, it's only looking at the last character, because that's what i was overwritten to before the first animate() actually fires.

You can counteract this by manually creating a closure yourself, wrapping it in a function and passing it in, to preserve the variable at the time of the loop.

For more information on closures, check out: What is a 'Closure'?

var textClass = $(".first-text");
var text = textClass.text();
textClass.text("");
for (var i in text) {
  (function (char) {
    $(textClass).animate({
      opacity: 0.25
    }, 200, function() {
      $(textClass).append(text.charAt(char));
    });
  })(i)
}
p:not(:first-child) {
  display: none;
}

p {
  margin: 0 auto;
  font-size: 24px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div class="animate-text">
  <p class="first-text">HTML</p><br>
</div>

Alternatively, you can use new let or const syntax, which defines i for the scope of the block (Which essentially creates a closure around your if block.)

var textClass = $(".first-text");
var text = textClass.text();
textClass.text("");
for (const i in text) {
  $(textClass).animate({
    opacity: 0.25
  }, 200, function() {
    $(textClass).append(text.charAt(i));
  });
}
p:not(:first-child) {
  display: none;
}

p {
  margin: 0 auto;
  font-size: 24px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div class="animate-text">
  <p class="first-text">HTML</p><br>
</div>

  • thanks a lot for your answer, really helped me understand the logic behind my bug. – Code_Ninja Jul 30 '18 at 11:26
  • 1
    But why not const for the other two constants? They are not changing either – mplungjan Jul 30 '18 at 11:27
  • No problem @Code_Ninja. Javascript can get really nasty with closures, and the let/const syntax really helps clarify the scope of variables. I pretty much use them everywhere, and stray away from using var at all. – FrankerZ Jul 30 '18 at 11:28
  • 1
    @mplungjan He can certainly, and I would recommend doing that, but this was not the scope of the issue he encountered, so I tried to avoid changing code unnecessarily. – FrankerZ Jul 30 '18 at 11:28
2

You can either create a closure or use let or const to declare the variable i inside for loop which will preserve the current value of i in each iteration:

var textClass = $(".first-text");
var text = textClass.text();
textClass.text("");
for (const i in text) {
  $(textClass).animate({
    opacity: 0.25
  }, 200, function() {
    $(textClass).append(text.charAt(i));
  });
}
p:not(:first-child) {
  display: none;
}

p {
  margin: 0 auto;
  font-size: 24px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div class="animate-text">
  <p class="first-text">HTML</p><br>
</div>

  • i would use const when ever possible to indicate that the variable are not being changed anywhere else in the code – Endless Jul 30 '18 at 11:18
  • @Endless, thanks for the point....updated the question. – Mamun Jul 30 '18 at 11:23
  • ......sorry I mean updated the answer. – Mamun Jul 30 '18 at 11:35
1

Using the let and const instead of var you get a better scoping and do not need to create a closure. Also no need to keep doing $(textClass) - you can cache the object

const $textClass = $(".first-text");
const text = $textClass.text();
$textClass.text("");
for (let i in text) {
  $textClass.animate({
    opacity: 0.25
  }, 200, function() {
     $textClass.append(text.charAt(i));
  });
}
p:not(:first-child) {
  display: none;
}

p {
  margin: 0 auto;
  font-size: 24px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div class="animate-text">
  <p class="first-text">HTML</p><br>
</div>

  • 1
    thanks @mplungjan for the fix, it worked and I wonder whats the difference if I use var i or let i or const i. – Code_Ninja Jul 30 '18 at 11:20
  • Even though OP is wrapping his textClass in $() unnecessarily, it really doesn't cause any overhead. jQuery will see it as a jQuery object, and simply return it. – FrankerZ Jul 30 '18 at 11:23
  • It is still inelegant in my mind - there will be some cases where it does not and then you add overhead – mplungjan Jul 30 '18 at 11:25
1

It seems to have a variable declaration in your script.

var textClass = $(".first-text");
var text = textClass.text();
textClass.text("");
for (const i in text){
  $(textClass).animate({
    opacity: 0.25
  }, 200, function(){
    $(textClass).append(text.charAt(i));
  });
}

Please review the following JSFiddle link. http://jsfiddle.net/tp3juw54/19/

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.