1

I saw a comment that said initialization of a char array with "\001" would put a nul as the first character. I have seen where \0 does set a nul.

The unedited comment:

char input[SIZE] = ""; is sufficient initialization. while ( '\001' == input[0]) doesn't do what you think it is doing if you have initialized input[SIZE] = "\001"; (which creates an empty-string with the nul-character as the 1st character.)

This program

#include <stdio.h>
#define SIZE 8
int main ( void) {
    char input[SIZE] = "\001";

    if ( '\001' == input[0]) {//also tried 1 == input[0]
        printf ( "octal 1\n\n");
    }
    else {
        printf ( "empty string\n");
    }
    return 0;
}

running on Linux, compiled with gcc, outputs:

octal 1

so the first character is 1 rather than '\0'.
Is this the standard behavior or just something with Linux and gcc? Why does it not set a nul?

6
  • 2
    I would say the referred comment is wrong. – Eugene Sh. Jul 30 '18 at 18:02
  • 1
    \0 by itself produces a NUL, but the standard behavior is for \001 to produce a character with numeric value 1, as you observed. (The general rule is that a backslash followed by one, two, or three octal digits is a single escape.) Please quote us the complete and unedited actual comment that you saw, with at least five lines of context above and below, and if possible provide a link to the entire program you are quoting. – zwol Jul 30 '18 at 18:02
  • There is a difference between '\001' and "\001" – Saeid Yazdani Jul 30 '18 at 18:04
  • @SaeidYazdani But it is not really relevant here – Eugene Sh. Jul 30 '18 at 18:05
  • Yes there is, @SaeidYazdani, and the OP gives every indication of understanding that. – John Bollinger Jul 30 '18 at 18:05
3

Is this the standard behavior or just something with Linux and gcc? Why does it not set a nul?

The behavior of the code you present is as required by the standard. In both string literals and integer character constants, octal escapes may contain one, two, or three digits, and the C standard specifies that

Each octal [...] escape sequence is the longest sequence of characters that can constitute the escape sequence.

(C2011, 6.4.4.4/7)

In this context it is additionally relevant that \0 is an octal escape sequence, not a special, independent code for the null character. The wider context of the above quotation will make that clear.

In the string literal "\001", the backslash is followed by three octal digits, and an octal escape can have three digits, therefore the escape sequence consists of the backslash and all three digits. The first character of the resulting string is the one with integer value 1.

If for some reason you wanted a string literal consisting of a null character followed by the decimal digits 0 and 1, then you could either express the null with a full three-digit escape,

"\00001"

or split it up like so:

"\0" "01"

C will join adjacent string literals to produce the wanted result.

0
3

I saw a comment that said initialization of a char array with "\001" would put a nul as the first character.

That comment was in error.

From 6.4.4.1 Integer constants, paragraph 3, emphasis mine:

An octal constant consists of the prefix 0 optionally followed by a sequence of the digits 0 through 7 only.

But what we are looking at here is not an integer constant at all. What we have here is, actually, an octal escape sequence. And that is defined as follows (in 6.4.4.4 Character constants):

octal-escape-sequence:
        \ octal-digit
        \ octal-digit octal-digit
        \ octal-digit octal-digit octal-digit

The definition -- both for integer constants as well as character constants -- is "greedy", as elaborated by paragraph 7:

Each octal or hexadecimal escape sequence is the longest sequence of characters that can constitute the escape sequence.

That means, if the first octal digit is followed by something that could be an octal digit, that next character is considered an octal digit belonging to that constant (to a maximum of three in the case of character constants -- not so for integer constants!).

Hence, your "\001" is, indeed, a character with the value 1.

Note that, while octal character constants run up to three characters maximum (making such a constant quite safe to use if padded with leading zeroes as necessary to get a length of three digits), hexadecimal character constants run as long as there are hexadecimal digits (potentially overflowing the char type they are meant to initialize).

4
  • The most important part is the uncited port70.net/~nsz/c/c11/n1570.html#6.4.4.4p7 – Eugene Sh. Jul 30 '18 at 18:10
  • That's what my last paragraph is paraphrasing, yes. (I didn't want to drag the formal "leaking" spec for hexadecimal-escape-sequence into this.) – DevSolar Jul 30 '18 at 18:12
  • The definition -- both for integer constants as well as character constants -- is "greedy" - is this an example of maximal munch rule? – Arkadiusz Drabczyk Jul 30 '18 at 18:26
  • @ArkadiuszDrabczyk: I am actually not sure if the C syntax definition as a whole is meant to be greedy; in the places I am aware of it making a difference, it's made explicit in the surrounding text. – DevSolar Jul 30 '18 at 18:28
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See http://c0x.coding-guidelines.com/6.4.4.4.html

Octal sequence is defined as:

  octal-escape-sequence:
            \ octal-digit
            \ octal-digit octal-digit
            \ octal-digit octal-digit octal-digit

and item 873:

The octal digits that follow the backslash in an octal escape sequence are taken to be part of the construction of a single character for an integer character constant or of a single wide character for a wide character constant.

also item 877:

Each octal or hexadecimal escape sequence is the longest sequence of characters that can constitute the escape sequence.

Therefore the behaviour is correct. "\001" should not have null byte at position 0.

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