1

Given an array A of n integers, I want to find the ways of selecting ordered triplets. For eg.

A = [1, 2, 1, 1]
different ways are  (1, 2, 1), (1, 1, 1) and (2, 1, 1)
so the answer will be 3.

for A = [2, 2, 1, 2, 2]
different ways are (1, 2, 2), (2, 1, 2), (2, 2, 1) and (2, 2, 2)
so the answer will be 4 in this case

If all the numbers are unique then I have come up with a recurrence

f(n) = f(n-1) + ((n-1) * (n-2))/2
where f(3) = 1 and f(2) = f(1) = 0

I am having trouble when numbers are repeated. This needs to be solved in O(n) time and O(n) space.

  • I believe I have a partial solution, but for the life of me cannot figure out how to account for duplicates (in linear time) where the middle element is the offender: (1,X,1), (1,Y,1) where X and Y are equal but are not the same element. – Dillon Davis Jul 30 '18 at 19:16
  • For the other cases, first iterate over the array forward, recording the position of the first occurrence of each value. If an element isn't the first occurrence of its value, subtract (arr_length - curr_index - 1) from the total (skip iterating over the last two elements). These all would be duplicates where the offender is the first element. Next, repeat the process but iterating backwards, to record duplicates where the offending element is the last in the triplet. It occurs to me now that elements may get counted twice this way, so that's another problem that needs resolved. – Dillon Davis Jul 30 '18 at 19:23
  • 1
    Shouldn't the first example also return 4? You are missing (1, 1, 2). – Emil Jul 30 '18 at 19:37
  • 1
    @Emil No the triplet should be in same order as in array. for any triplet (a, b, c) a should be positioned before b and b before c – Abhishek Jha Jul 30 '18 at 19:44
  • 3
    how do you know that this can be solved in O(n) time? – juvian Jul 30 '18 at 19:57
1

The dynamic programming relation for the number of unique, ordered sets, from an array of size idx is:

DP[size of set][idx] = DP[size of set][idx-1] + DP[size of set - 1][idx-1] - DP[size of set - 1][ last_idx[ A[idx] - 1]

So, to calculate the number of ordered, unique sets of size LEN from an array of idx elements:

  • Take the number of ordered, unique sets of size LEN that can be created from an array of idx-1 elements
  • Add the number of ordered, unique sets that can be formed by adding element idx to the end of ordered, unique sets for size LEN-1
  • Don’t double count. Subtract the number of ordered, unique sets that can be formed by adding the PREVIOUS occurrence of element idx to the end of ordered, unique sets for size LEN-1.

This works because we are always counting unique sets as we go through the array. Counting unique the sets is based on the previous element counts of unique sets.

So, start with sets of size 1, then do size 2, then size 3, etc.

For unique, ordered sets of constant size LEN, my function takes O(LEN * N) memory and O(LEN * N) time. You should be able to reuse the DP array to reduce the memory to a constant independent of LEN, O(constant * N).

Here is the function.

    static int answer(int[] A) {
    // This example is for 0 <= A[i] <= 9.  For an array of arbitrary integers, use a proper
    //   HashMap instead of an array as a HashMap. Alternatively, one could compress the input array
    //   down to distinct, consecutive numbers. Either way max memory of the last_idx array is O(n).
    //   This is left as an exercise to the reader.
    final int MAX_INT_DIGIT = 10;
    final int SUBSEQUENCE_LENGTH = 3;
    int n = A.length;

    int[][] dp = new int[SUBSEQUENCE_LENGTH][n];
    int[] last_idx = new int[MAX_INT_DIGIT];
    Arrays.fill(last_idx, -1);

    // Init dp[0] which gives the number of distinct sets of length 1 ending at index i
    dp[0][0] = 1;
    last_idx[A[0]] = 0;

    for (int i = 1; i < n; i++) {
        if (last_idx[A[i]] == -1) {
            dp[0][i] = dp[0][i - 1] + 1;
        } else {
            dp[0][i] = dp[0][i - 1];
        }
        last_idx[A[i]] = i;
    }

    for (int ss_len = 1; ss_len < SUBSEQUENCE_LENGTH; ss_len++) {
        Arrays.fill(last_idx, -1);
        last_idx[A[0]] = 0;
        for (int i = 1; i < n; i++) {
            if (last_idx[A[i]] <= 0) {
                dp[ss_len][i] = dp[ss_len][i - 1] + dp[ss_len-1][i - 1];
            } else {
                dp[ss_len][i] = dp[ss_len][i - 1] + dp[ss_len-1][i - 1] - dp[ss_len-1][last_idx[A[i]] - 1];
            }
            last_idx[A[i]] = (i);
        }
    }

    return dp[SUBSEQUENCE_LENGTH-1][n - 1];
}

For [3 1 1 3 8 0 5 8 9 0] the answer I get is 62.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.