5

This example works fine:

use File::Slurp qw(read_file);
local *File::Slurp::read_file = sub {
    return 'test';
};

warn File::Slurp::read_file('/root/test.txt'); # return 'test'

this one too:

use File::Slurp qw(read_file);
local *read_file = sub {
    return 'test';
};

warn read_file('/root/test.txt');   # return 'test'

but if I use full name of function in typeglob it doesn't work and attempt to read file:

use File::Slurp qw(read_file);
local *File::Slurp::read_file = sub {
    return 'test';
};

warn read_file('/root/test.txt');

Could anyone explain why I can not redefine subroutine by full namespace, File::Slurp::read_file, and use by short name?

In case of object method, it works fine:

use LWP::UserAgent;
local *LWP::UserAgent::get = sub {
    return HTTP::Response->new( undef, undef, undef, 'Hello world' );    
};

my $ua = LWP::UserAgent->new;
warn $ua->get()->content;
0

2 Answers 2

7

Your problem is caused by how the way export works. and how Perl assigns names to values. In Perl each name is a link to a value so sub read_line { ... } creates an anonymous subroutine reference and assigns it to the name &read_line

use File::Slurp qw(read_file);
local *File::Slurp::read_file = sub {
    return 'test';
};

In your first example you are overriding File::Slurp::read_file and then calling File::Slurp::read_file so you get your version of File::Slurp::read_file.

use File::Slurp qw(read_file);
local *read_file = sub {
    return 'test';
};

In your second example you are overriding your imported version of read_file and then calling that so you get your version of read_file

use File::Slurp qw(read_file);
local *File::Slurp::read_file = sub {
    return 'test';
};

In your third example the following happens:

use File::Slurp; does a *read_file = \&File::Slurp::read_file at compile time, which makes read_file point to the existing version of File::Slurp::read_file. Your code then assigns *File::Slurp::read_file a new sub ref, however this does not change read_file and it still points to the sub ref that File::Slurp::read_file originally pointed to. You then call read_file which is pointing to the original imported version of File::Slurp::read_file

In your fourth example Perl's method resolution system means that you are calling LWP::UserAgent::get so this is equivalent to your first example.

4
  • 1
    Good explanation, I might just add that the "imported version of read_file" (the OP called it "short name") is main::read_file, i.e. there's nothing really special about it - it's just a regular symbol table entry too, in the default package main.
    – haukex
    Commented Jul 31, 2018 at 11:34
  • I thought about that but decided that there was nothing in the examples to show if they where in the main:: package or in another package, so I wrote it without showing the package the symbol was imported into
    – JGNI
    Commented Jul 31, 2018 at 11:38
  • True. I just didn't want to leave the impression that there's something particularly "magic" about importing or about "short names" (stuff in the default/current package), hence my comment.
    – haukex
    Commented Jul 31, 2018 at 11:49
  • Fair enough :-)
    – JGNI
    Commented Jul 31, 2018 at 11:52
2

When a sub is exported its reference is written to the caller's symbol table. Then after the sub is redefined in the module the unqualified name in the caller still refers to the "old" one, that was Exported, and not the redefined one.

One clear fix is to explicitly alias the (unqualified) name in the calling package

*func = *{ Module::func } = sub { ... };

Then wrap this in a subroutine, from which all wanted namespaces can be taken care of

sub redefine_sub {
    my ($fqn, $code) = @_;

    no warnings 'redefine';  # these pragmas are lexical, and
    no strict 'refs';        # so stay scoped to this sub only

    *{ $fqn } = $code;

    # Redefine in caller
    my ($name) = $fqn =~ /.*::(.*)/;
    my $to_caller = caller() . '::' . $name;
    *{ $to_caller } = $code;
}

In the caller

use Module qw(func);

redefine_sub('Module::func', sub { ... });

(Original attempts, that didn't work well, have been removed)

4
  • Does this work for you if you replace Cwd with File::Slurp? Strangely, I cannot get it to work with File::Slurp.. Commented Jul 31, 2018 at 10:30
  • @HåkonHægland You are right, it doesn't -- thank you. It's much too late here so I'm removing this for now.
    – zdim
    Commented Jul 31, 2018 at 10:43
  • @HåkonHægland Edited to address that, thank you. I cannot see what in these modules makes that difference, and I find some more subtle behavior which I don't get. So the only fix I see is to explicitly set names in all needed namespaces.
    – zdim
    Commented Jul 31, 2018 at 19:11
  • @PaulSerikov Edited, and added a possibly reasonable way to do what you want
    – zdim
    Commented Aug 1, 2018 at 6:36

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