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I have looked into the documentation for GRANT Found here(https://docs.aws.amazon.com/redshift/latest/dg/r_GRANT.html) and I was trying to see if there is a built-in function that can let me look at what level of accessibility I have in databases. Of course there is:

\dp and \dp mytablename

But this does not show what my account has access to. I would like to see ALL the schemas I have access to or user. Can anyone tell me if there is a command that can check my level of access in Postgres/Redshift (whether I have CREATE, USAGE privileges)? And if so, what would that command be? And same for the database (whether I have CREATE, TEMP, TEMPORARY privileges)

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Make sure you are familiar with the model that Postgres uses for users/roles: from the Postgres documentation

PostgreSQL manages database access permissions using the concept of roles. A role can be thought of as either a database user, or a group of database users, depending on how the role is set up. Roles can own database objects (for example, tables and functions) and can assign privileges on those objects to other roles to control who has access to which objects

So, you should be thinking in terms of "which roles is user X assigned, and to which objects do those roles have access (and what type of access)?" while keeping in mind that user X is also a role.

Also keep in mind that "schema" and "database" are namespaces, not objects. Tables and columns are the objects. Asking about schema/database rights is not going to be very useful because those are not the objects to which privileges are applied.

Try this experiment:

  1. Set up a test database, and create a new schema. Add a test table to the schema, and create a test user.
  2. Look at the content of pg_namespace, table_privileges, role_column_grants, column_privileges, role_table_grants.
  3. Grant USAGE on the schema to the test user. Look at those tables again.
  4. Grant SELECT to the table, and look at the same tables one more time.

You should notice that granting USAGE only added the test user to a namespace. Granting select should have applied permissions to the actual database object (the table).

You are probably looking for something like this:

select * from information_schema.role_table_grants

and possibly the other role_ tables:

information_schema.role_column_grants
information_schema.role_routine_grants
information_schema.role_table_grants
information_schema.role_udt_grants
information_schema.role_usage_grants
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  • i want user specific privilege on schema and databases not on tables like for tables we fetch such information using SELECT table_catalog, table_schema, table_name, privilege_type FROM information_schema.table_privileges WHERE grantee = username; i was trying to fetch same for schema and database – user9807549 Jul 31 '18 at 18:23
  • "schema" and "database" are namespaces, not objects. Tables and columns are the objects. Asking about schema/database rights is not going to be very useful because those are not the objects to which privileges are applied. Try this experiment: set up a test database, and create a new schema, and a test table, and a test user. now look at the content of pg_namespace, table_privileges, role_column_grants, column_privileges, role_table_grants. Now, grant USAGE on the schema to the test user. Look at those tables again. Now grant select to the table, and look at the same tables one more time. – Z4-tier Aug 1 '18 at 14:16
  • Now, with that said, you can certainly write SQL that will aggregate the contents of the tables i named in my answer/previous comment, just keep in mind the framework that Postgres uses for roles and privileges on database objects. – Z4-tier Aug 1 '18 at 14:25
  • thanks Z4-tier that was very helpful. They are not objects so i'll have retrieve it by querying the tables as you mentioned – user9807549 Aug 1 '18 at 15:50
  • Thanks, I added the comments to the answer itself. If this is what you were asking for, you should accept this answer. – Z4-tier Aug 1 '18 at 18:35

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