28

I am trying to implement a search method in a TreeSet. By using an iterator with a condtional I would like to be able to run through the set and print the object that matches the condition. However the way I am doing it at the moment is printing out the subsequent object rather than the current. This is what I have so far:

public void getDetails() {
        Iterator<Person> it = this.getPersonSet().iterator();
        System.out.println("Enter First Name");
        String first = in.next().toLowerCase();
        System.out.println("Enter Second Name");
        String last = in.next().toLowerCase();

        while (it.hasNext()) {
            if (it.next().getLast().toLowerCase().equals(last)) {
                Person p = it.next();
                System.out.println(p);
            }
        }

    }

Any help would be great

33

This is what you would want to do:

while (it.hasNext()) {
            Person p = it.next();
            if (p.getLast().toLowerCase().equals(last)) {
                System.out.println(p);
            }
        }
  • Thanks a lot, spot on :) – Robairto Mar 2 '11 at 1:34
  • Will this not skip the first object in the arraylist? :/ – Srujan Barai Feb 11 '17 at 11:23
  • 2
    @SrujanBarai - nope. (Literally yes ... it will "not skip it") – Stephen C Mar 30 '17 at 1:32
  • @StephenC oh yes, I implemented it and it is not skipping the first object, seems like iterator points to nothing at first and then next objects on it.next(); – Srujan Barai Mar 30 '17 at 5:50
  • So why would you expect it to skip the first object? That's not how iterators work ... at all. And if you are expecting the code in this answer to skip something, that's not what it is intended to do. (Perhaps you should ask your own Question, showing us your own version of this code, and explaining clearly what the problem is ...) – Stephen C Mar 30 '17 at 6:18
24

How do I refer to the current object in an iterator

For the record, the Iterator API does not allow you to do this. There is no notion of a "current" object. The Iterator.next() method gives you the next object ... and moves on.

(The ListIterator.previous() and ListIterator.next() methods are analogous. Note that in the ListIterator case, method behaviour is documented in terms of a cursor that denotes a position before / between / after elements in the sequence being iterated.)

The solution is to assign the result of calling it.next() to a temporary variable, as described by the accepted answer.


I don't know for sure why the designers didn't include the notion of a "current" object in the API, but I can think of a couple of reasons:

  • It would make a typical iterator object bigger; i.e. an extra field to hold the current object.
  • It would mean more 1 more method for an Iterator class to implement.
  • The notion of a current object does not fit well with the "cursor" model documented in the ListIterator interface ... and implied by the current Iterator design.
  • There is a minor issue of the Iterator "hanging onto" the current object, thereby preventing it from being GC'ed.
  • The large majority of iterator use-cases don't require a current object.
  • There are other ways to deal with this.

Sounds like a good call ...

  • I don't understand at all why there is no "current." A very basic use of this is any case where one would like to compare the current value and the next asynchronously. For example, if a list is modified, index might no longer point to where you want it to, so the obvious solution is an iterator.. though that doesn't allow for comparing of values. Erg. – Thumbz Mar 25 '14 at 23:28
  • @Thumbz - Well ... see my answer for reasons why "current" would be a bad idea in general. (It would be bad to break some use-cases just for the convenience of others.) And for your use-case, consider writing an iterator wrapper class which adds a getCurrent() method ... if that simplifies things for you. – Stephen C Mar 26 '14 at 0:03
  • 3
    If you'd look at the source code of an iterator, nothing of the second part of your answer is true. An iterator holds 2 variables: int cursor pointing to the next element and int lastRet pointing to the last element returned. Thus no extra field is needed. These are index numbers and not the objects itself thus an iterator does not in any way 'hang onto' the current object. The cursor model is used to explain the design of the iterator, not the other way around. And it's not because 90% wouldn't use it, you don't have to implement it. That's just bad design. – Didii Jul 18 '14 at 15:11
  • @Didii - that is for a specific iterator implementation. But consider how that approach works in a linked list ... or an iterator for a lazy stream. Sure, a current() method is easy for some kinds of iterators, but it has issues for others. You can't call "bad design" without considering all of the implementations and all of use-cases for Iterator. If you want to do this, please feel free to 1) do the research, and 2) set out your findings in another Answer. – Stephen C Jul 19 '14 at 0:06
3

If you need an existing implementation, you can use the ones from Google Guava or Apache Commons Collections.
The other answers are easier for your simple problem, but if you need to pass the iterator around and keep track of the last item returned by next(), these would help.

Here is an example using Guava with the OP's code (assumging Person indeed has a String toLowerCase() method):

import com.google.common.collect.PeekingIterator;
import static com.google.common.collect.Iterators.peekingIterator;

public void getDetails() {
    PeekingIterator<Person> it = peekingIterator(this.getPersonSet().iterator());
    System.out.println("Enter First Name");
    String first = in.next().toLowerCase();
    System.out.println("Enter Second Name");
    String last = in.next().toLowerCase();

    while (it.hasNext()) {
        // note the usage of peek() instead of next()
        if (it.peek().getLast().toLowerCase().equals(last)) {
            Person p = it.next();
            System.out.println(p);
        }
    }

}
  • It would be better to show a small example of how those iterators can be used in this specific case instead of simply linking to them. – Artjom B. Jan 31 '17 at 22:24
1

Hold the reference of the object in a separate var:

Person current = it.next();
current.methodOne();
current.methodTwo();

When you're done with the current value, re-assing it the next

...
// done? 
current = it.next();

In a loop looks like:

while( it.hasNext() ) { 
   Person current = it.next();
   current.doA();
   current.doB();
   current.doC();
 }
0

the next() method returns the current object, like this:

private class IterSinglyLinked implements SimpleIterator<T> {
    Element curr = head;        // next element to return

    public boolean hasNext() {
        return curr != null;
    }

    public T next() throws Exception {
        if (curr == null) throw new Exception("no more elements");
        T data = curr.data;
        curr = curr.next;
        return data;
    }
}

If it returns the next one rather than the current one, there will be no way to reach the very first one

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.