1

I have the following situation:

interface AbstractState {...}
interface SubState {...}

interface NiceInterface {
  var currentState: AbstractState
  ...
}

Furthermore I have a class which implements this interface.

class Class : NiceInterface {
  override var currentState: AbstractState = SubState()
}

This implies that I have to write the following at every use of it in the class:

(currentState as SubState).doSomething()

Is there a way to avoid the "as SubState" part? Or some kind of smart way to do it?

Like with generics:

interface => val currentStates: List<out AbstractState>
class     => override val currentStates = ArrayList<SubState>()
0

To answer your question, I'll need first to explain how it works.
When you define

interface NiceInterface {
  var currentState: AbstractState
  ...
}

What Kotlin does for you is basically defining two methods, which in pseudo-Java may look like this:

interface NiceInterface {
   AbstractState getCurrentState();
   void setCurrentState(AbstractState state);
}

What you're trying to do is to overload method with the same signature, but different return type:

interface NiceInterface {
   @Override
   SubState getCurrentState();
   ...
}

Obviously that's not possible.

You don't specify what's your use case, but I might assume from your examples is that what you're really looking for is property delegation: https://kotlinlang.org/docs/reference/delegated-properties.html

  • 4
    "Obviously that's not possible" yes, it is, google "covariant return type". The problem is the setter. – Alexey Romanov Aug 2 '18 at 5:42
0

As Alexey Romanov said the problem with setter, so there is a workaround, replace var by val:

interface AbstractState {}
class SubState : AbstractState{}

interface NiceInterface {
    val currentState: AbstractState
}

class Class : NiceInterface {
    override val currentState: SubState by lazy {
        SubState()
    }
}

So now you don't need to cast:

currentState.doSomething()

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.