24

Given the following class definitions:

public class BaseClass
{
    public string SomeProp1 { get; set; }
}

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public string SomeProp2 { get; set; }
}

How can I take a List<BaseClass> and convert it to a List<DerivedClass>?

In my real-world scenario BaseClass has a whole bunch of properties that I don't want to have to copy over one-by-one (and then remember to maintain if an additional property gets added).

Adding a parameterised constructor to BaseClass is not an option as this class is defined by a WCF service reference.

  • Doesn't WCF generate partial classes in proxy code? – DK. Feb 5 '09 at 16:12
  • At another glance, you didn't say if DerivedClass is only a functional extension on top of base or actually has to be a different data structure as it's suggested by the code sample. IMHO, in the 2nd case, "conversion" makes no sense. – DK. Feb 5 '09 at 16:17
26
List<DerivedClass> result = 
    listBaseClass.ConvertAll(instance => (DerivedClass)instance);

Actually ConvertAll is good when you need to create new objects based on the original, when you just need to cast you can use the following

List<DerivedClass> result = 
    listBaseClass.Cast<DerivedClass>().ToList();

If not all of the items in your list can be cast to DerivedClass then use OfType instead

List<DerivedClass> result =
    listBaseClass.OfType<DerivedClass>().ToList();
  • 1
    I'm going to regret tempting you back here, aren't I? ;) – Jon Skeet Feb 5 '09 at 15:53
  • 3
    "Does not appear to work", I'll bet you expect better bug reports from your users don't you? using System.Linq; Do you have that? – Peter Morris Feb 7 '09 at 17:13
  • Six years later...not sure why I thought this didn't work, but so long as every object in listBaseClass is an instance of DerivedClass it works perfectly. – Richard Ev Mar 6 '15 at 16:43
  • It's better to use .Cast<DerivedClass>() if it is a sub class, it reads better don't you think? Thanks for getting back to us though! – Peter Morris Mar 7 '15 at 12:43
  • Cast<T> actually returns an IEnumerable<T>, not List<T>, so this code won´t compile. – HimBromBeere Mar 1 '18 at 15:56
17

You can't convert the actual object, but it's easy to create a new list with the converted contents:

List<BaseClass> baseList = new List<BaseClass>(...);
// Fill it here...

List<DerivedClass> derivedList = baseList.ConvertAll(b => (DerivedClass) b);

Or if you're not using C# 3:

List<DerivedClass> derivedList = baseList.ConvertAll<DerivedClass>(delegate
    (BaseClass b) { return (DerivedClass) b; };

This assumes that the original list was actually full of instances of DerivedClass. If that's not the case, change the delegate to create an appropriate instance of DerivedClass based on the given BaseClass.

EDIT: I'm not sure why I didn't just post a LINQ solution:

List<DerivedClass> derivedList = baseList.Cast<DerivedClass>().ToList();
  • This doesn't seem to work. I think it's because you can't cast from a base class to a derived class? – Dan Bailiff Mar 27 '13 at 18:49
  • @DanBailiff: As stated in the answer: "This assumes that the original list was actually full of instances of DerivedClass." In that case, it does work. If you believe it doesn't, you'll need to give more details. – Jon Skeet Mar 27 '13 at 18:50
  • @Jon I think you are the Undisputed King of C# – gmail user Jul 5 '13 at 3:17
  • I personally like the LINQ solution best. – Luca Cremonesi Nov 23 '15 at 21:39
3

(repeated from here)

First - note that you can add constructors (and other code) to WCF classes - you just need to do it in a partial class (and leave the generated code alone).

It sounds like the type of the items in the list need to be changed - so we can't just cast. Reflection is an option, but is slow. Since you are using 3.5, we can perhaps write an Expression to do it for us more efficiently... along these lines, but using the second class too:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Linq.Expressions;
static class Program
{
    class Foo
    {
        public int Value { get; set; }
        public override string ToString()
        {
            return Value.ToString();
        }
    }
    class Bar : Foo {}
    static void Main()
    {
        List<Foo> foos = new List<Foo>();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) foos.Add(new Foo { Value = i });

        List<Bar> bars = foos.ConvertAll<Bar>(Clone<Foo, Bar>);
    }
    public static TTo Clone<TFrom, TTo>(this TFrom obj) where TTo : TFrom, new()
    {
        return ObjectExtCache<TFrom, TTo>.Convert(obj);
    }
    static class ObjectExtCache<TFrom, TTo> where TTo : TFrom, new()
    {
        private static readonly Func<TFrom, TTo> converter;
        static ObjectExtCache()
        {
            ParameterExpression param = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TFrom), "in");
            var bindings = from prop in typeof(TFrom).GetProperties()
                           where prop.CanRead && prop.CanWrite
                           select (MemberBinding)Expression.Bind(prop,
                               Expression.Property(param, prop));
            converter = Expression.Lambda<Func<TFrom, TTo>>(
                Expression.MemberInit(
                    Expression.New(typeof(TTo)), bindings), param).Compile();
        }
        public static TTo Convert(TFrom obj)
        {
            return converter(obj);
        }
    }
}
2
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Linq;

namespace ConsoleApplication22
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<BaseClass> source = new List<BaseClass>();
            source.Add(new DerivedClass { Name = "One" });
            source.Add(new BaseClass());
            source.Add(new DerivedClass { Name = "Three" });

            List<DerivedClass> result =
                new List<DerivedClass>(source.OfType<DerivedClass>());
            result.ForEach(i => Console.WriteLine(i.Name));
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

    public class BaseClass
    {
    }

    public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }

}

This code will not only convert, but also only include instances that ARE the derived class and exclude any that are not.

2

As others have suggested, if you have an instance of a List<BaseClass> you can convert it to a List<DerivedClass> using the ConvertAll method of List.

More generally, if you have anything that implements IEnumerable<T> (which doesn't have a ConvertAll method) you can use Linq's Cast to do the same thing:

IEnumerable<DerivedClass> result = listBaseClass.Cast<DerivedClass>();

If you need an a List back instead of an IEnumerable, you can just tack a call to ToList() on the end.

As Jon said, though, that's all assuming that all of the entries in listBaseClass are actually of type DerivedClass.

0

Just for the record, in case there is a constructor with parameters, you need to explicitly instantiate each item in the list.

Using OP example:

public class BaseClass
{
    public BaseClass (string param1)
    {
         Param1 = param1;
    }
    public string SomeProp1 { get; set; }
    public string Param1 { get; private set; }
}

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public DerivedClass (string param1) : base(param1){}
    public string SomeProp2 { get; set; }
}

In this case, the line of code should be something like:

List<DerivedClass> result = listBaseClass.ConvertAll(l=> new DerivedClass(l.Param1));

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