38

Is it possible to set property on each element from List using LINQ.

for example:

var users = from u in context.Users where u.Name == "George" select u;

foreach (User us in users){
   us.MyProp = false;
}

Is it possible to make it cleaner ?

2
  • 1
    No, neither LINQ nor LINQ to SQL has set-based update capabilities.
    – Shiv Kumar
    Mar 2, 2011 at 9:19
  • 3
    How would you define cleaner? Shorter? Less use of constructs including indendtation? Fewer lines of code in your method? Mar 2, 2011 at 9:26

6 Answers 6

89

Or you can convert it to ToList() and use ForEach method.

users.ToList().ForEach(u => u.MyProp = false);

to update more than one properties

users.ToList().ForEach(u =>
                      {
                         u.property1 = value1;
                         u.property2 = value2;
                      });

Or like this

(from u in context.Users where u.Name == "George" select u).ToList()
.ForEach(u => u.MyProp = false);
5
  • +1 but this would void the benefits of deferred execution of IEnumerable<T>, but I imagine that this feature would bring an interesting amount of weird behaviors. The objects would be modified only when iterated over (!) Mar 2, 2011 at 9:40
  • @Johann Blais: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/05/18/… is a nice read
    – Anuraj
    Mar 2, 2011 at 9:44
  • I had this article in mind when I wrote my comment. A very nice read indeed. :) Mar 2, 2011 at 10:50
  • 1
    There's an error in your ForEach statement. .ForEach({ u => should be .ForEach( u => {
    – Niklas
    Jun 17, 2013 at 9:07
  • Would this approach perform better than to loop every element in a foreach loop and update them individually inside the loop? @Niklas Aug 2, 2019 at 9:02
4

You can create your own ForEach extension method:

public static IEnumerable<T> ForEach<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Action<T> action)
{
    foreach (var element in source)
    {
        action(element);
    }

    return source;
}

Then your code can be simplified to:

context.Users.Where(x => x.Name == "George").ForEach(u => u.MyProp = false);

EDIT: You could also yield return each item after the call to action() (no pun intended) to leave the deferred execution untouched.

9
  • 2
    wouldn't it be context.Users.Where(x => x.Name == "George").ForEach(u => u.MyProp = false);
    – Manatherin
    Mar 2, 2011 at 9:23
  • 6
    @Shiv: that is not correct. List<T> has a ForEach method, but IEnumerable<T> does not. Mar 2, 2011 at 9:28
  • 2
    @Shiv IEnumerable doesn't, a List<T> has ForEach though so .ToList could be used. Also the only time i've seen it with a ForAll is when it's made parallel
    – Manatherin
    Mar 2, 2011 at 9:29
  • @Shiv: Can you give a source for your comment? I just checked msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9eekhta0.aspx and don't seem to find such a method. We infact explicitly created such an extension in our framework!
    – Numan
    Mar 2, 2011 at 9:32
  • @Manatherin, your solution won't work, will it? ForEach is not a method on IEnumerable<T>.
    – Shiv Kumar
    Mar 2, 2011 at 9:33
3

What is cleaner is quite subjective. Personally, I find this approach hard to beat for clarity and simplicity:

foreach (User us in users.Where(u => u.Name == "George"))
{
   us.MyProp = false;
}
1

If you're interested in in-memory update, that is the database is not going to be updated then you could use

var users = (from u in context.Users where u.Name == "George" select u).ToList();
users.ForEach(u => u.MyProp = "Something");
3
  • 4
    I don't think IEnumerable contains a ForEach method.
    – Anuraj
    Mar 2, 2011 at 9:29
  • 1
    @Anuraj, missed the .ToList(). I've updated my code to include the query portion so it's clear
    – Shiv Kumar
    Mar 2, 2011 at 9:36
  • 1
    I think you need to remove the var users declaration too. Otherwise it won't compile.
    – Anuraj
    Mar 2, 2011 at 9:38
1

Looks dirty but if asked (just via select), I'll do it this way

var users = from u in context.Users where u.Name == "George" 
select new User() 
{
   prop1 = u.prop1,
   prop2 = u.prop2,
   prop3 = true // update like here
};

if you wish to use some other C# function, you can also use linq functions and work on IEnumerable type of lists.

var users = context.Users.Where(u => u.Name == "George").ToList()
    .Select(p => new User() 
    {
       prop1 = p.prop1,
       prop2 = p.prop2,
       prop3 = ComputeHash(p) // update like here
    });

Code above becomes IEnumerable because of the .ToList() prior to the .Select()

0

How about:

 context.Users.Where(u => u.Name == "George").Select(u => u.MyProp = false);
2
  • 2
    you can't change the value in the select statement
    – Manatherin
    Mar 2, 2011 at 9:31
  • 1
    @Manatherin: well in theory it can be done, but not like in this answer (and not in a way that would really make sense). Mar 2, 2011 at 9:42

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