4

I've got this simple model:

models.py

class Ping(models.Model):
    online = models.BooleanField()
    created = models.DateTimeField(db_index=True, default=timezone.now)

    def __str__(self):
        return f'{self.online}, {self.created}'

It gives me the following results:

mysql [lab]> SELECT * FROM myapp_ping;
+----+--------+----------------------------+
| id | online | created                    |
+----+--------+----------------------------+
|  1 |      1 | 2018-08-02 13:34:09.435292 |
|  2 |      1 | 2018-08-02 13:35:09.520200 |
|  3 |      0 | 2018-08-02 13:36:09.540638 |
|  4 |      0 | 2018-08-02 13:37:10.529783 |
|  5 |      1 | 2018-08-02 13:38:09.779012 |
|  6 |      1 | 2018-08-02 13:39:09.650365 |
|  7 |      1 | 2018-08-02 13:40:09.625543 |
|  8 |      1 | 2018-08-02 13:41:09.892196 |
|  9 |      1 | 2018-08-02 13:42:09.802186 |
| 10 |      1 | 2018-08-02 13:43:09.864551 |
| 11 |      1 | 2018-08-02 13:44:09.960962 |
| 12 |      1 | 2018-08-02 13:45:09.891947 |
| 13 |      0 | 2018-08-02 13:46:09.141727 |
| 14 |      0 | 2018-08-02 13:47:09.142030 |
| 15 |      0 | 2018-08-02 13:48:09.160942 |
| 16 |      0 | 2018-08-02 13:49:09.152879 |
| 17 |      0 | 2018-08-02 13:50:09.280246 |
| 18 |      1 | 2018-08-02 13:51:09.363184 |
| 19 |      1 | 2018-08-02 13:52:09.405863 |
| 20 |      1 | 2018-08-02 13:53:09.403251 |
+----+--------+----------------------------+
20 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Is there a way to get an output similar to this (the ranges in which online has been false):

Downtime:

from                | to                  | duration
2018-08-02 13:36:09 | 2018-08-02 13:37:10 | 1 minute and 1 second
2018-08-02 13:46:09 | 2018-08-02 13:50:09 | 4 minutes and 0 seconds

I'm not sure if this can be done with Django ORM or it will need a raw MySQL query to use something like CASE orIF statements?

Update: Wed 8 Aug 15:13:15 UTC 2018

So I've got a proof of concept for both solutions from @AKX answer:

models.py

class PingManager(models.Manager):
    def downtime_python(self):
        queryset = super().get_queryset().filter(created__gt=timezone.now() - timezone.timedelta(days=30))
        offline = False
        ret = []
        for entry in queryset:
            if not entry.online and not offline:
                offline = True
                _ret = {'start': str(entry.created)}
            if entry.online and offline:
                _ret.update({'end': str(entry.created)})
                ret.append(_ret)
                offline = False
        return ret

    def downtime_sql(self):
        queryset = super().get_queryset().filter(created__gt=timezone.now() - timezone.timedelta(days=30))
        offline = queryset.filter(online=False).order_by('created').first()
        last = queryset.order_by('created').last()
        ret = []
        if offline:
            online = queryset.filter(created__gt=offline.created, online=True).order_by('created').first()
            ret.append({'start': str(offline.created), 'end': str(online.created)})
            while True:
                offline = queryset.filter(created__gt=online.created, online=False).order_by('created').first()
                if offline:
                    online = queryset.filter(created__gt=offline.created, online=True).order_by('created').first()
                if (online and offline) and online.created < last.created:
                    ret.append({'start': str(offline.created), 'end': str(online.created)})
                    continue
                else:
                    break
        return ret

class Ping(models.Model):
    online = models.BooleanField()
    created = models.DateTimeField(db_index=True, default=timezone.now)
    objects = PingManager()

    def __str__(self):
        return f'{self.online}, {self.created}'

Questions:

  1. Should I create a static methods for this or the custom manger is the right solution here?

  2. Why such a huge difference between executions times if both calculations run in memory? Is there a way to improve and make it more pythonic the python equivalent method?

Test:

# python manage.py shell
Python 3.6.5 (default, Apr 10 2018, 17:08:37) 
Type 'copyright', 'credits' or 'license' for more information
IPython 6.5.0 -- An enhanced Interactive Python. Type '?' for help.

In [1]: from myapp.models import Ping

In [2]: Ping.objects.downtime_sql()[0]
Out[2]: 
{'start': '2018-07-13 16:32:16.009356+00:00',
 'end': '2018-07-13 16:33:15.942784+00:00'}

In [3]: Ping.objects.downtime_python()[0]
Out[3]: 
{'start': '2018-07-13 16:32:16.009356+00:00',
 'end': '2018-07-13 16:33:15.942784+00:00'}

In [4]: Ping.objects.downtime_sql() == Ping.objects.downtime_python()
Out[4]: True

In [5]: import timeit

In [6]: timeit.timeit(stmt=Ping.objects.downtime_python, number=1)
Out[6]: 5.720254830084741

In [7]: timeit.timeit(stmt=Ping.objects.downtime_sql, number=1)
Out[7]: 0.25946347787976265
  • 3
    I'm not sure even SQL case/if statements can get you that result, since the result rows depend on previous rows. This is easy to do procedurally in Python though. – AKX Aug 2 '18 at 14:52
  • How large is queryset in those methods? downtime_python() will need to load all of them from the database and "deserialize" them into models. – AKX Aug 8 '18 at 18:53
  • It's quite large, probes are running every minute so 30 days that's ~40256 – HTF Aug 8 '18 at 20:31
  • That's why it's so much slower, then. :D – AKX Aug 9 '18 at 7:28
4
+100

To expand on my comment:

I'm not sure even SQL case/if statements can get you that result, since the result rows depend on previous rows. This is easy to do procedurally in Python though.

  1. The obvious way is to just loop over Ping.objects.all() (or Ping.objects.iterator()) and keep track of the online variable to form the "streaks" you want. This has the downside that you really do need to loop over every object, which will eventually be slow (and/or exhaust your memory).
  2. A more complex way, which uses more queries but far less memory, is to find the first Ping object that is offline, then find the next (time-wise) Ping object that is again online -- that'll form one streak. Then rinse and repeat this until you run out of Ping objects to inspect.

Edit

So yeah, here's a (rather elegant, if you don't mind me saying) concrete implementation of method 2 (find the full test repo at https://github.com/akx/so51656477):

class PingQuerySet(models.QuerySet):
    def streaks(self):
        queryset = self.values_list('created', 'online').order_by('created')
        entry = queryset.first()
        while entry:
            next_entry = queryset.filter(created__gt=entry[0], online=(not entry[1])).first()
            yield (entry, next_entry)
            entry = next_entry

It's a generator of 2-tuples of tuples: ((start_timestamp, start_online), (end_timestamp, end_online) | None).

For instance, to get the up/down or down/up pairs in the last 10 days,

for start, end in Ping.objects.filter(created__gt=now() - timedelta(days=10)).streaks():
    print(start, end)

will print something like

[...snip...]

(datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 8, 10, 12, 943500), False) (datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 10, 10, 12, 943500), True)
(datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 10, 10, 12, 943500), True) (datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 11, 10, 12, 943500), False)
(datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 11, 10, 12, 943500), False) (datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 11, 40, 12, 943500), True)
(datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 11, 40, 12, 943500), True) (datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 12, 40, 12, 943500), False)
(datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 12, 40, 12, 943500), False) (datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 16, 40, 12, 943500), True)
(datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 16, 40, 12, 943500), True) (datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 17, 40, 12, 943500), False)
(datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 17, 40, 12, 943500), False) (datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 18, 10, 12, 943500), True)
(datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 18, 10, 12, 943500), True) (datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 19, 40, 12, 943500), False)
(datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 19, 40, 12, 943500), False) (datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 23, 10, 12, 943500), True)
(datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 8, 23, 10, 12, 943500), True) (datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 9, 0, 10, 12, 943500), False)
(datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 9, 0, 10, 12, 943500), False) (datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 9, 3, 10, 12, 943500), True)
(datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 9, 3, 10, 12, 943500), True) (datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 9, 3, 40, 12, 943500), False)
(datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 9, 3, 40, 12, 943500), False) (datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 9, 5, 10, 12, 943500), True)
(datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 9, 5, 10, 12, 943500), True) (datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 9, 5, 40, 12, 943500), False)
(datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 9, 5, 40, 12, 943500), False) (datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 9, 7, 10, 12, 943500), True)
(datetime.datetime(2018, 8, 9, 7, 10, 12, 943500), True) None

Some notes:

  • The last end value may be None, which means that the machine is still up or down (depending on the status value of the start tuple).
  • If you only care about the times when the machine was down, simply ignore the pairs where the start tuple's status value is True.
  • Since this is a generator, you can just stop iterating it when you've had enough data, and it won't query any further.
  • Since this is a QuerySet extension method, you can add other filters as you like (so long as they don't filter on online). For instance, if you had a host field, Ping.objects.filter(host='example.com').streaks().
| improve this answer | |
  • any chance you can provide some examples for both solutions? – HTF Aug 7 '18 at 14:29
  • Please see my update from Wed 8 Aug 15:13:15 UTC 2018, any comments much appreciated. – HTF Aug 8 '18 at 15:37
  • @HTF Okay, I've added an implementation of my own :) – AKX Aug 9 '18 at 13:04
2

You can use a @classmethod and then format the output the way you want, here I have an example:

from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta


class Ping(models.Model):
    online = models.BooleanField()
    created = models.DateTimeField(db_index=True, default=timezone.now)

    def __str__(self):
        return f'{self.online}, {self.created}'

    @classmethod
    def ping_online_duration(cls, is_online):
        first = cls.objects.filter(online=is_online).order_by('created').first()
        last = cls.objects.filter(online=is_online).order_by('created').last()
        return {
            'from': first.created.strftime('%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'),
            'to': last.created.strftime('%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'),
            'duration': (f'{relativedelta(last.created, first.created).minutes} minutes '
                         f'{relativedelta(last.created, first.created).seconds} seconds.')
        }

And you can call it like:

For on-line group:

Ping.ping_online_duration(True)

{'from': '2018-08-02 15:02:19',
 'to': '2018-08-02 15:03:02',
 'duration': '0 minutes 43 seconds'}

For off-line group:

Ping.ping_online_duration(False)

{'from': '2018-08-02 15:02:27',
 'to': '2018-08-02 15:03:01',
 'duration': '0 minutes 34 seconds'}

As I said before, you can format the output the way you need.

| improve this answer | |
  • I like this concept but the results will be wrong. It'll search for the first and last record where online is false: >>> relativedelta(last.created, first.created) relativedelta(days=+20, hours=+18, seconds=+59, microseconds=+988703) -> '0 minutes 59 seconds.'. Btw, why did you use classmethod method and not a staticmethod in this case? – HTF Aug 3 '18 at 12:32

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