52

At the end of route function, when I do something like this.

res.send(JSON.stringify({...}));

I would like the content-type of response to be set as "text/plain", but it is "text/html". Is there way to set it explicitly? I search the document but no clue yet.

3 Answers 3

70

setHeader before sending: https://nodejs.org/api/http.html#http_response_setheader_name_value

res.setHeader('content-type', 'text/plain');
res.send(JSON.stringify({...}));
3
  • 6
    Given that this question is tagged with express, it's probably better to use res.type('txt'), or maybe res.set('content-type', 'text/plain') instead of res.setHeader, as the latter is technically from a different API (though express uses it internally, and thus it does still work). This doesn't strike me as enough problem to warrant a downvote, but I refer folks to an How to Answer[stackoverflow.com/a/61555719/313756] I just wrote for a a more thorough (and express-oriented) treatment.
    – lindes
    Commented May 2, 2020 at 7:24
  • 4
    This solution appears to be outdated. There is no setHeader. Just "set": expressjs.com/en/4x/api.html#res.set
    – Johann
    Commented Dec 6, 2020 at 11:40
  • 1
    @AndroidDev as the previous comment noted, setHeader is on the node api. nodejs.org/api/http.html#http_response_setheader_name_value Commented Dec 7, 2020 at 17:12
40

There are a few ways to achieve this, the cleanest/simplest of which is probably (assuming the use of express, based on the tag; see final answer option if not using expressjs):

res.type('txt');
res.send(JSON.stringify({...}));

That's using res.type, which gives a number of shorthands, as well as being able to set explicit mime types, e.g. (among many others):

res.type('.html')            // => 'text/html'
res.type('html')             // => 'text/html'
res.type('json')             // => 'application/json'
res.type('application/json') // => 'application/json'
res.type('png')              // => 'image/png'
res.type('mp3')              // => 'audio/mp3'

As of this writing, this is implemented in terms of res.set, which could also be called directly:

res.set('content-type', 'text/plain');
res.send(JSON.stringify({...}));

These are the officially documented ways of performing this functionality (except that also res.header is an alias for res.set). However, it appears that the response objects are derived from http.ServerResponse, and thus also have (and use, in the implementation) the setHeader method from that, which has the same usage as res.set, without quite all of the same functionality as res.set (some checks aren't done, etc.)... But it does get the basic job done, and so it's entirely possible one might find code in the wild that would solve your this question's goals as (especially if it's not an express application, but using the http package, instead):

res.setHeader('Content-Type', 'text/plain');
res.send(JSON.stringify({...}));

(As a side-note: per RFC 7230 (formerly in RFC 2616), the header names are case insensitive. That said, the Content-Type capitalization is what's used in RFC 7231, which defines its meaning and usage, and is what res.type will use. That said, I've seen at least some examples of res.set being used with all-lower-case header names, so I thought I'd show that both are possible.)

2
  • Nothing of this works. Express just keeps sending text/html for no apparent reason whatsoever. Commented Feb 8, 2023 at 5:41
  • Well, I'm guessing there's some sort of reason, though I absolutely can believe that it may not be apparent. That said, without knowing a whole lot more about your situation, it's difficult for me to know what to suggest. Have you tried this in an isolated test environment? (Like, did Express stop supporting this, or is it something else you're doing? Narrowing that down will be helpful for troubleshooting... though you might want to ask it as its own question -- and go through stackoverflow.com/help/minimal-reproducible-example ... which might even be enough to solve it!)
    – lindes
    Commented Feb 8, 2023 at 17:30
8

You can try res.set to set a Content-Type header, like so:

res.set('content-type', 'text/plain');
res.send(JSON.stringify({...}));
0

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