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Scenario 1 : Mutable object like list

def a(l):
    l[0] = 1
    print("\nValue of l = {0} in a()".format(l))

def b(l):
    l = l + [9]
    print("\nValue of l = {0} in b()".format(l))

l = [0]

a(l)
print("\nValue of l = {0} after executing a()".format(l))
b(l)
print("\nValue of l = {0} after executing b()".format(l))

Output

Value of l = [1] in a()
Value of l = [1] after executing a()
Value of l = [1, 9] in b()
Value of l = [1] after executing b()

Questions

  • In the context of mutable objects, why is the modification done to l in b() not visible in global scope whereas it happens for a()?

Scenario 2 : Immutable object like integer

def a(l):
    l = 1
    print("\nValue of l = {0} in a()".format(l))
def b(l):
    l = l + 9
    print("\nValue of l = {0} in b()".format(l))

l = 0

a(l)
print("\nValue of l = {0} after executing a()".format(l))
b(l)
print("\nValue of l = {0} after executing b()".format(l))

Output

Value of l = 1 in a()
Value of l = 0 after executing a()
Value of l = 9 in b()
Value of l = 0 after executing b()

Questions

  • In the context of immutable objects, why is the modification done to l in both a() and b() not visible in the global scope?

I checked with many folks and they couldnt explain this. Can someone explain the fundamental concepts used in this example?

marked as duplicate by abarnert python Aug 3 '18 at 4:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • The premise is wrong. You are creating new local objects. In b, try using .append instead - the list is mutable, and that will modify the list in-place, as opposed to creating a new object. If you want to reference variables in the global namespace, you should use the global keyword at the top of your function. Python creates a separate space for local keywords within functions... I'll just write an answer. – Zizouz212 Aug 3 '18 at 3:53
  • 1
    The fundamental principle you’re missing is the difference between values and names. I’m not sure which question this is a duplicate of, but there are a few with great answers that explain it. Briefly, l[0] = is modifying the value that l names, but l =is just making l name a different value. That’s the difference between the first example and the other three examples. – abarnert Aug 3 '18 at 3:59
  • @Zizouz212 You mean to say l = l + [9] creates a new local object and l.append(9) doesnt ? Why is that? Will look forward for your answer. – GeorgeOfTheRF Aug 3 '18 at 4:00
  • I think the top few answers on the first linked duplicate will explain everything you're asking. Some of the others are closer questions to your question, but the answers aren't as good (which is why most of them ended up being closed as duplicates of the first one). – abarnert Aug 3 '18 at 4:06
  • The only thing missing is the fact that the + operator never modifies anything in Python, it always returns a new object. (Technically, you could write a class with an __add__ method that modifies self, but that would be confusing and deeply unpythonic.) So, l = l + [0] is just a special case of that general rule: l + [0] returns a new object, and then l = just assigns that new object to your local variable l, the same as if you'd written, say, l = 2. I can't find a dup that covers that part. – abarnert Aug 3 '18 at 4:08

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