48

I know vertical alignment is always asked about, but I don't seem to be able to find a solution for this particular example. I'd like the text centered within the element, not the element centered itself:

HTML:

<ul>
    <li><a href="">I would like this text centered vertically</a></li>
</ul>

CSS:

li a {
    width: 300px;
    height: 100px;
    margin: auto 0;
    display: block;
    background: red;
}

li a {
    width: 300px;
    height: 100px;
    margin: auto 0;
    display: block;
    background: red;
}
<ul>
    <li><a href="">I would like this text centered vertically</a></li>
</ul>

Is there really no CSS3 property for this? I'd be willing to add a <span> in but I really don't want to add any more markup than that.

Thanks!

83

According to the CSS Flexible Box Layout Module, you can declare the a element as a flex container (see figure) and use align-items to vertically align text along the cross axis (which is perpendicular to the main axis).

enter image description here

That is all you need to do is

display: flex;
align-items: center;

Browser support considerations

Chrome

display: -webkit-flex;
-webkit-align-items: center;

Firefox

Set layout.css.flexbox.enabled to true.

Alternatively you can still use

display: -moz-box;
-moz-box-align: center;

Just know that this is not css3-flexbox and that it will not wrap.

IE

Can someone check the IE syntax and add it here? You can try the syntax from Advanced cross-browser flexbox.

See this fiddle (Remember to set layout.css.flexbox.enabled to true if you're on FF.)

  • 1
    The line-height will only work if the text doesn't go onto a second line. Then you'd have a couple of issues ;-) – Alex Mar 2 '11 at 11:16
  • 1
    Yes, indeed, I'd like something that ha the flexibility to be multiple lines. Thanks – user623520 Mar 2 '11 at 11:18
  • Brilliant, thanks very much! I came so close to this a few hours ago and then went down a different track for some reason. Damn it. CSS3 to the rescue. Thanks! – user623520 Mar 2 '11 at 11:34
  • 9
    CAREFUL! this is not cross-browser! 30-50% of your user will see it in unintended by designer way (IE) – Jeffz Oct 13 '12 at 18:25
  • 1
    Dec 22, 2014, chrome v 39.0.2171.95 m, ff 34.0 both works fine just with display: flex; align-items: center;, IE 8 and 9 does not work, and does not look good, better define custom styles for them. – dav Dec 22 '14 at 16:56
51

You can also try

a {
  height:100px;
  line-height:100px;
}
  • This single line method was my first answer but if you read the first three comments you will see that the OP wants a general solution. – melhosseiny Jun 24 '13 at 22:25
  • 1
    Also doesn't work for anything that has a dynamic height – Bill Jan 14 '16 at 15:20
  • The problem with this is having 2 or more lines. The next line will go missing. – Radityo Ardi Oct 25 '16 at 6:53
  • If you have a multiline text, you can divide it in <span> tags and adjust your CSS to display them as block elements. Then, adjust line-height and padding-top of the <span> tags in the CSS to align them vertically. Unless you really need a dynamical solution, I guess it is the simpler cross-browser solution for the problem. – aldemarcalazans Aug 30 '17 at 20:54
12
li a {
width: 300px;
height: 100px;
display: table-cell;
vertical-align: middle;
margin: auto 0;
background: red;

}

  • I am very suprised this is the first use of table-cell I have seen on this post. Supported down to ie8. – Andrew Plummer Jun 15 '14 at 10:13
  • use text-align: center; to recover h.alignment @PeterX – RozzA Oct 1 '16 at 3:03
  • this is the only answer that worked for me - above accepted flex answer doesn't seem to center horizontally in FF even in 2016 – RozzA Oct 1 '16 at 3:11
  • This does align the text correctly, but the problem with this - using it for a link - is that the entire "cell" is now clickable. So (from this specific code), now the user could click anywhere inside the 300x100 area and it will go to the destination, which is an issue if the expectation is to have a text link, rather than an "image" or full area link. – ZeekLTK Feb 4 '19 at 16:30
5

You can try the display:inline-block and :after.Like this:

HTML

<ul>
    <li><a href="">I would like this text centered vertically</a></li>
</ul>

CSS

li a {
    width: 300px;
    height: 100px;
    margin: auto 0;
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
    background: red;  
}
li a:after {
  content:"";
  display: inline-block;
  width: 1px solid transparent;
  height: 100%;
  vertical-align: middle;
}

Please view the demo.

  • width: 1px solid transparent; -- did you mean border? Here's the tweak: codepen.io/anon/pen/asDGl – Jiskiras Oct 17 '13 at 22:42
  • 1
    highly underrated solution – Taruc Jan 12 '16 at 17:03
  • 3
    this solution doesn't support multi-line text & is therefore even less useful than the line-height trick – RozzA Oct 1 '16 at 2:56
2

Would using padding be OK for your needs?: http://jsfiddle.net/sm8jy/:

li {
    background: red;
    text-align:center;
}
li a {
    padding: 4em 0;
    display: block;
}
  • I'm affraid I require the height to be exactly 100px every time, regardless of number of lines, text-size, line-height etc. If we used 50px instead of 4em, this just adds 50px either side of the text. The height of the text is variable so the total height would never be uniform accross multiple list items. – user623520 Mar 2 '11 at 11:28
1

Here's the general solution using just CSS, with two variations. The first centers vertically in the current line, the second centers within a block element.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    <title>Insert title here</title>
</head>
<body>
    <ul>
        <li>
            line one
        </li>
        <li>
            <span style="display: inline-block; vertical-align: middle">line two dot one
                <br />
                line two dot two</span>
        </li>
        <li>
            line three
        </li>
    </ul>
    <div style="height: 200px; line-height: 200px; border-style: solid;">
            <span style="display: inline-block; vertical-align: middle; line-height: normal;">line two dot one
                <br />
                line two dot two</span>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

As I understand it, vertical-align applies only to inline-block elements, e.g., <img>. You have to change an element's display attribute to inline-block for it to work. In the example, the line height expands to fit the span. If you want to use a containing element, such as a <div>, set the line-height attribute to be the same as the height. Warning, you will have to specify line-height: normal on the contained <span>, or it will inherit from the containing element.

  • 1
    vertical-align applies to: 1) table cells; 2) inline elements; 3) inline-block elements. – steveax Jun 13 '12 at 19:27
1

You can also use inline-table alongside table-cell if you want to center your items vertically and horizontally. Below an example of using those display properties to make a menu:

.menu {
  background-color: lightgrey;
  height: 30px; /* calc(16px + 12px * 2) */
}

.menu-container {
  margin: 0px;
  padding: 0px;
  padding-left: 10px;
  padding-right: 10px;
  height: 100%;
}

.menu-item {
  list-style-type: none;
  display: inline-table;
  height: 100%;
}

.menu-item a {
  display: table-cell;
  vertical-align: middle;
  padding-left: 2px;
  padding-right: 2px;
  text-decoration: none;
  color: initial;
}

.text-upper {
  text-transform: uppercase;
}

.text-bold {
  font-weight: bold;
}
<header>
  <nav class="menu">
    <ul class="menu-container">
      <li class="menu-item text-upper text-bold"><a href="javascript:;">StackOverflow</a></li>
      <li class="menu-item"><a href="javascript:;">Getting started</a></li>
      <li class="menu-item"><a href="javascript:;">Tags</a></li>
    </ul>
  </nav>
</header>

It works by setting display: inline-table; to all the <li>, and then applying display: table-cell; and vertical-align: middle; to the children <a>. This gives us the power of <table> tag without using it.

This solution is useful if you do not know the height of your element.

The compatibilty is very good (relative to caniuse.com), with Internet Explorer >= 8.

0

with thanks to Vlad's answer for inspiration; tested & working on IE11, FF49, Opera40, Chrome53

li > a {
  height: 100px;
  width: 300px;
  display: table-cell;
  text-align: center; /* H align */
  vertical-align: middle;
}

centers in all directions nicely even with text wrapping, line breaks, images, etc.

I got fancy and made a snippet

li > a {
  height: 100px;
  width: 300px;
  display: table-cell;
  /*H align*/
  text-align: center;
  /*V align*/
  vertical-align: middle;
}
a.thin {
  width: 40px;
}
a.break {
  /*force text wrap, otherwise `width` is treated as `min-width` when encountering a long word*/
  word-break: break-all;
}
/*more css so you can see this easier*/

li {
  display: inline-block;
}
li > a {
  padding: 10px;
  margin: 30px;
  background: aliceblue;
}
li > a:hover {
  padding: 10px;
  margin: 30px;
  background: aqua;
}
<li><a href="">My menu item</a>
</li>
<li><a href="">My menu <br> break item</a>
</li>
<li><a href="">My menu item that is really long and unweildly</a>
</li>
<li><a href="" class="thin">Good<br>Menu<br>Item</a>
</li>
<li><a href="" class="thin">Fantastically Menu Item</a>
</li>
<li><a href="" class="thin break">Fantastically Menu Item</a>
</li>
<br>
note: if using "break-all" need to also use "&lt;br>" or suffer the consequences

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