16

What's the easiest way to flatten a multidimensional array ?

15

Using List::Flatten seems like the easiest:

use List::Flatten;

my @foo = (1, 2, [3, 4, 5], 6, [7, 8], 9);        
my @bar = flat @foo;  # @bar contains 9 elements, same as (1 .. 9)

Actually, that module exports a single simple function flat, so you might as well copy the source code:

sub flat(@) {
    return map { ref eq 'ARRAY' ? @$_ : $_ } @_;
}

You could also make it recursive to support more than one level of flattening:

sub flat {  # no prototype for this one to avoid warnings
    return map { ref eq 'ARRAY' ? flat(@$_) : $_ } @_;
}
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35

One level of flattening using map

$ref = [[1,2,3,4],[5,6,7,8]]; # AoA

@a = map {@$_} @$ref;         # flattens it

print "@a";                   # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
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  • I love it! Very elegant! – Younes Apr 23 '13 at 19:40
  • 6
    Worth nothing this only works if $ref is filled with arrayrefs. Won't work if it's a mix of scalars and arrayrefs. – Asmor Oct 28 '15 at 18:57
9

The easiest and most natural way, is to iterate over the values and use the @ operator to "dereference" / "unpack" any existing nested values to get the constituent parts. Then repeat the process for every reference value encountered.

This is similar to Viajayenders solution, but works for values not already in an array reference and for any level of nesting:

sub flatten {
  map { ref $_ ? flatten(@{$_}) : $_ } @_;
}

Try testing it like so:

my @l1 = [ 1, [ 2, 3 ], [[[4]]], 5, [6], [[7]], [[8,9]] ];
my @l2 = [ [1,2,3,4,5], [6,7,8,9] ];
my @l3 = (1, 2, [3, 4, 5], 6, [7, 8], 9);  # Example from List::Flatten

my @r1 = flatten(@l1);
my @r2 = flatten(@l1);
my @r3 = flatten(@l3);

if (@r1 ~~ @r2 && @r2 ~~ @r3) { say "All list values equal"; }
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  • Along the same lines, but iterative instead of recursive: @array=map { ref $_ eq 'ARRAY' ? @$_ : $_ } @array while grep ref $_ eq 'ARRAY', @array – hobbs Dec 3 '13 at 19:26
  • This answer would throw an exception if the array contains any non-array references. You only check if the value if a reference, not if the reference is an array reference. Providing a hash reference would result the error "Not an ARRAY reference". – 3limin4t0r Sep 18 at 18:24
3

if data is always like an example, I recommend List::Flatten too.

but data has more than 2 nested array, flat cant't work.

like @foo = [1, [2, [3, 4, 5]]]

in that case, you should write recursive code for it.

how about bellow.

sub flatten {
  my $arg = @_ > 1 ? [@_] : shift;
  my @output = map {ref $_ eq 'ARRAY' ? flatten($_) : $_} @$arg;
  return @output;
}

my @foo = (1, 2, [3, 4, 5, [6, 7, 8]], 9);
my $foo = [1, 2, [3, 4, 5, [6, 7, 8]], 9];
my @output = flatten @foo;
my @output2 = flatten $foo;
print "@output";
print "@output2";
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  • modified to shorten and accept array reference at first. – Yasuhiro Nakayama Mar 21 '17 at 8:21
  • Note that flatten will return an empty output when providing a list with a single scalar value or throws an error when providing a list with a single non-array reference. For example @input = (42) will result in an empty output (@{42} results in an empty list), while @input = ({ name => 'John Doe'}) will result in an error (@{{name => 'John Doe'}} results in "Not an ARRAY reference"). – 3limin4t0r Sep 18 at 18:05
2

The easiest way to flatten a multidimensional array when it includes: 1. arrays 2. array references 3. scalar values 4. scalar references

sub flatten {
   map { ref $_ eq 'ARRAY' ? flatten(@{$_}) :
         ref $_ eq 'SCALAR' ? flatten(${$_}) : $_
   } @_;
}

The other flatten sub answer crashes on scalar references.

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0

Something along the lines of:

my $i = 0;

while ($i < scalar(@array)) {
    if (ref @array[$i] eq 'ARRAY') {
        splice @array, $i, 1, @$array[$i];
    } else {
        $i++;
    }
}

I wrote it blindly, no idea if it actually works but you should get the idea.

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0

Same as Vijayender's solution but will work on mixed arrays containing arrayrefs and scalars.

$ref = [[1,2,3,4],[5,6,7,8],9,10];
@a = map { ref $_ eq "ARRAY" ? @$_ : $_ } @$ref;
print "@a"

Of course you can extend it to also dereference hashrefs:

@a = map { ref $_ eq "ARRAY" ? @$_ : ref $_ eq "HASH" ? %$_: $_ } $@ref;

or use grep to weed out garbage:

@a = map { @$_} grep { ref $_ eq 'ARRAY' } @$ref;

As of List::MoreUtils 0.426 we have an arrayify function that flattens arrays recursively:

@a = (1, [[2], 3], 4, [5], 6, [7], 8, 9);
@l = arrayify @a; # returns 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

It was introduced earlier but was broken.

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