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As I reviewed lots of examples for "Decorator" design pattern, I just came up with sample which were mainly about changing a method that always return a string, or a method like cost() that aggregates numbers.

Is this really the only usage of Decorator design pattern?

Why I can't see a real sample or use case for such design pattern.

All I know it is used for Java IO API.

But I would like to have something else that printing a text. Something real. I searched so much, but I could not find a suitable sample.

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Decorator adds responsibilities for an object dynamically. Let's say we need to count the number of times an item is added to a Set (a kind of instrumentation detail). We have Set interface in java and we can implement a decorator to add the instrumentation behavior to an existing Set implementation like so.

public class InstrumentedSet<E> extends ForwardingSet<E> {
    private int addCount = 0;

    public InstrumentedSet(Set<E> s) {
        super(s);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean add(E e) {
        addCount++;
        return super.add(e);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean addAll(Collection<? extends E> c) {
        addCount += c.size();
        return super.addAll(c);
    }

    public int getAddCount() {
        return addCount;
    }

}

public class ForwardingSet<E> implements Set<E> {
    private final Set<E> s;

    public ForwardingSet(Set<E> s) {
        super();
        this.s = s;
    }

    @Override
    public int size() {
        return s.size();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isEmpty() {
        return s.isEmpty();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean contains(Object o) {
        return s.contains(o);
    }

    @Override
    public Iterator<E> iterator() {
        return s.iterator();
    }

    @Override
    public Object[] toArray() {
        return s.toArray();
    }

    @Override
    public <T> T[] toArray(T[] a) {
        return s.toArray(a);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean add(E e) {
        return s.add(e);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean remove(Object o) {
        return s.remove(o);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean containsAll(Collection<?> c) {
        return s.containsAll(c);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean addAll(Collection<? extends E> c) {
        return s.addAll(c);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean retainAll(Collection<?> c) {
        return s.retainAll(c);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean removeAll(Collection<?> c) {
        return s.removeAll(c);
    }

    @Override
    public void clear() {
        s.clear();
    }

}

There are lot more examples for Decorator pattern that you better take a look. For an instance, say you are developing Window based GUI application. You may need to add borders to the window, a scroll bar and so on. Some times you may need to add any combination of those. That is a good use of Decorator pattern as stated in the famous Design Patterns book [1] by Gamma. I would suggest you read this book [1] to find more about design patterns.

[1] https://www.amazon.com/Design-Patterns-Elements-Reusable-Object-Oriented/dp/0201633612

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