5

In order to speed up data augmentation for training a neural network, I am trying to have some form of parallel processing for feeding my GPU with data. At the moment the limitation is how fast I generate augmented data, not how fast the GPU trains the network.

If I try to use multiprocessing=True with a generator, I get the following error with keras 2.2.0 in Python 3.6.6 under Windows 10 (v1083) 64-bit:

ValueError: Using a generator with use_multiprocessing=True is not supported on Windows (no marshalling of generators across process boundaries). Instead, use single thread/process or multithreading.

I found e.g. the following on GitHub so this is an expected behavior with keras under Windows. That link seemed to suggest moving to a sequence instead of a generator (even though the error message seems to suggest to use multithreading, but I also could not figure out how to use multithreading with keras instead of multi-processing - I may have overlooked it in the documentation, but I just did not find it). So, I used the the code below (modifying an example using a sequence), but that also achieves no speed-up or in the variant with use_multiprocessing=True just freezes up.

Am I missing something obvious here for how to get some form of parallel generator going?

Minimal (non-)working example:

from keras.utils import Sequence
from keras.models import Sequential
from keras.layers import Dense
from keras.utils import to_categorical
import numpy as np

class DummySequence(Sequence):

    def __init__(self, x_set, y_set, batch_size):
        self.x, self.y = x_set, y_set
        self.batch_size = batch_size

    def __len__(self):
        return int(np.ceil(len(self.x) / float(self.batch_size)))

    def __getitem__(self, idx):        
        batch_x = self.x[idx * self.batch_size:(idx + 1) * self.batch_size]
        batch_y = self.y[idx * self.batch_size:(idx + 1) * self.batch_size]

        return np.array(batch_x), np.array(batch_y)



x = np.random.random((100, 3))
y = to_categorical(np.random.random(100) > .5).astype(int)

seq = DummySequence(x, y, 10)

model = Sequential()
model.add(Dense(32, input_dim=3))
model.add(Dense(2, activation='softmax'))
model.compile(optimizer='rmsprop',
              loss='categorical_crossentropy',
              metrics=['accuracy'])

print('single worker')
model.fit_generator(generator=seq, 
                    steps_per_epoch = 100,
                    epochs = 2, 
                    verbose=2,
                    workers=1)
print('achieves no speed-up')
model.fit_generator(generator=seq, 
                    steps_per_epoch = 100,
                    epochs = 2, 
                    verbose=2,
                    workers=6,
                    use_multiprocessing=False)
print('Does not run')
model.fit_generator(generator=seq, 
                    steps_per_epoch = 100,
                    epochs = 2, 
                    verbose=2,
                    workers=6,
                    use_multiprocessing=True)
1

In combination with a sequence, using multi_processing=False and workers=e.g. 4 does work.

I just realized that in the example code in the question, I was not seeing the speed-up, because the data was being generated too fast. By inserting a time.sleep(2) this becomes evident.

class DummySequence(Sequence):
def __init__(self, x_set, y_set, batch_size):
    self.x, self.y = x_set, y_set
    self.batch_size = batch_size
def __len__(self):
    return int(np.ceil(len(self.x) / float(self.batch_size)))
def __getitem__(self, idx):        
    batch_x = self.x[idx * self.batch_size:(idx + 1) * self.batch_size]
    batch_y = self.y[idx * self.batch_size:(idx + 1) * self.batch_size]
    time.sleep(2)
    return np.array(batch_x), np.array(batch_y)

x = np.random.random((100, 3))
y = to_categorical(np.random.random(100) > .5).astype(int)

seq = DummySequence(x, y, 10)

model = Sequential()
model.add(Dense(32, input_dim=3))
model.add(Dense(2, activation='softmax'))
model.compile(optimizer='rmsprop',
              loss='categorical_crossentropy',
              metrics=['accuracy'])

print('single worker')
model.fit_generator(generator=seq, 
                    steps_per_epoch = 10,
                    epochs = 2, 
                    verbose=2,
                    workers=1)

print('achieves speed-up!')
model.fit_generator(generator=seq, 
                    steps_per_epoch = 10,
                    epochs = 2, 
                    verbose=2,
                    workers=4,
                    use_multiprocessing=False)

This produced on my laptop the following:

single worker
>>> model.fit_generator(generator=seq,
...                     steps_per_epoch = 10,
...                     epochs = 2,
...                     verbose=2,
...                     workers=1)
Epoch 1/2
 - 20s - loss: 0.6984 - acc: 0.5000
Epoch 2/2
 - 20s - loss: 0.6955 - acc: 0.5100

and

achieves speed-up!
>>> model.fit_generator(generator=seq,
...                     steps_per_epoch = 10,
...                     epochs = 2,
...                     verbose=2,
...                     workers=4,
...                     use_multiprocessing=False)
Epoch 1/2
 - 6s - loss: 0.6904 - acc: 0.5200
Epoch 2/2
 - 6s - loss: 0.6900 - acc: 0.5000

Important notes: You will probably want self.lock = threading.Lock() in __init___ and then with self.lock: in __getitem__. Try to do the absolute bare minimum required within the with self.lock:, as far as I understand it, that would be any reference to self.xxxx (multi-threading is prevent while the with self.lock: block is running).

Additionally, if you want multithreading to speed up calculations (i.e. CPU operations are the limit), do not expect any speed-up. The global-interpreter lock (GIL) will prevent that. Multithreading will only help you, if the limitation is in I/O operations. Apparently, to speed-up CPU computations we need true multiprocessing, which keras currently does not support on Windows 10. Perhaps it is possible to hand-craft a multi-processing generator (I have no idea).

1

I tested your proposal at my solution with GPU / CPU monitoring.

  1. There is some speed increase ~10% (440 sec vs. 550 sec) in my case
  2. The CPU uses only 1 core at time. GPU load is not above 22%

Looks like one core runs more efficient way with more workers assigned. However no true multiprocessing is enabled.

TF 2.0

Keras 2.2.4

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