1

I'm trying to write simple DFT and IDFT functions which will be my core for future projects. Trouble means that IDFT returns different value from input value, and i can't understand, where is the mistake. Below my source code:

vector<double> input;
vector<double> result;
vector<complex<double>> output;

double IDFT(int n)
{
    double a = 0;
    double b = 0;
    int N = output.size();
    for(int k = 0; k < N; k++)
    {
        double value = abs(output[k]);
        a+= cos((2 * M_PI * k * n) / N) * value;
        b+= sin((2 * M_PI * k * n) / N) * value;
    }
    complex<double> temp(a, b);
    double result = abs(temp);
    result /= N;
    return result;
}
complex<double> DFT(double in, int k)
{
    double a = 0;
    double b = 0;
    int N = input.size();
    for(int n = 0; n < N; n++)
    {
        a+= cos((2 * M_PI * k * n) / N) * input[n];
        b+= -sin((2 * M_PI * k * n) / N) * input[n];
    }
    complex<double> temp(a, b);
    return temp;
}

int main()
{
    input.push_back(55);
    input.push_back(15);
    input.push_back(86);
    input.push_back(24);
    input.push_back(66);
    input.push_back(245);
    input.push_back(76);

    for(int k = 0; k < input.size(); k++)
    {
        output.push_back(DFT(input[k], k));
        cout << "#" << k << ":\t" << input[k] << " \t>> abs: " << abs(output[k]) << " >> phase: " << arg(output[k]) << endl;
    }
    for(int n = 0; n < output.size(); n++)
    {
        result.push_back(IDFT(n));
        cout << result[n] << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
  • 1
    If this is not just an educational exercise, why reinvent the wheel? – Ben Jones Aug 3 '18 at 20:21
  • fftw.org – Ben Jones Aug 3 '18 at 20:23
  • Maybe, if i decide to compile it for some microcontroller, i won't have problems with any additional libraries, and also, i must understand how it works in low level. – Roman Kulaha Aug 3 '18 at 20:26
  • 1
    Read about floating point arithmetic. – ZDF Aug 3 '18 at 20:26
  • Strongly recommend sourceforge.net/projects/kissfft - small, self contained, fast. – mtrw Aug 3 '18 at 20:31
1

Your inverse Fourier transform is obviously broken: you ignore the arguments of the complex numbers output[k].

It should look like this:

double IDFT(size_t n)
{
    const auto ci = std::complex<double>(0, 1);
    std::complex<double> result;
    size_t N = output.size();
    for (size_t k = 0; k < N; k++)
        result += std::exp((1. / N) * 2 * M_PI * k * n * ci) * output[k];
    result /= N;
    return std::abs(result);
}

Edit.

If you want to separate real and imaginary parts explicitly, you can use:

double IDFT(size_t n)
{
    double a = 0;
    size_t N = output.size();
    for (size_t k = 0; k < N; k++)
    {
        auto phase = (2 * M_PI * k * n) / N;
        a += cos(phase) * output[k].real() - sin(phase) * output[k].imag();
    }
    a /= N;
    return a;
}
  • 1
    In case the exp is confusing, this is equivalent to changing value to output[k].real() and output[k].imag() in OP's IDFT() accordingly. – Ben Jones Aug 3 '18 at 21:09
  • Thanks a lot, it works. – Roman Kulaha Aug 4 '18 at 5:36
  • Точнее, спасибо) – Roman Kulaha Aug 4 '18 at 5:37
-2

There is a library of Intel- IPP. It's offers you many functions with very high performance. It is very hard to write something that is more faster then their's functions. Try it: https://software.intel.com/en-us/intel-ipp

https://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/how-to-use-intel-ipp-s-1d-fourier-transform-functions

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.