6

The following are bare minimum examples (I know that e.g. UNICODE/_UNICODE should be defined) that I've found to work:

Linux:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
  char* str = "Rölf";
  printf("%s\n", str);
}

Windows:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <locale.h>

int main() {
  setlocale(LC_ALL, "");
  wchar_t* str = L"Rölf";
  wprintf(L"%s\n", str);
}

Now, I've read that one way of going about it is to basically "just use UTF-8/char everywhere and worry about platform-specific conversion when you do API calls".

And that would be great - have users provide char* as input for my library and "simply" convert that. So I've tried the following snippet based on this example (I've also seen it in variations elsewhere). If this would actually work, it would be amazing. But it doesn't:

  char* str = u8"Rölf";
  int len = mbstowcs(NULL, str, 0) + 1;
  wchar_t wstr[len];
  mbstowcs(wstr, str, len);
  wprintf(L"%s\n", wstr);

I've also stumbled across discussions about console fonts and whatnot being the cause of faulty rendering, so to demonstrate that this is not a console issue - the following doesn't work either (well - the L"" literal does. The converted u8 literal doesn't):

  MessageBoxW(NULL, wstr, L"Rölf", MB_OK);

enter image description here

Am I misunderstanding the conversion process? Is there a way to make to this work? (Without using e.g. ICU)

16
  • 1
    Which system requires (or even just benefits from having) UNICODE or _UNICODE defined? Aug 4, 2018 at 17:15
  • Wide characters use 2 or 4 bytes per character; UTF-8 is a multi-byte encoding. If you have C11 support on all relevant platforms (as it appears you do) then u8 etc may help. There is some support in standard C11 in the header §7.28 Unicode support <uchar.h>, but not all implementations support that, even if they support other parts of C11 (witness: macOS 10.13.6 does not have it). Aug 4, 2018 at 17:21
  • @JonathanLeffler Windows will use the ANSI versions for API calls you make if you don't define UNICODE. (Unless I guess you call the "wide" version explicitly like I did with MessageBoxW above) Also - as my question demonstrates, I'm not particularly familiar with Unicode. But there may be other reasons for why both MSDN and utf8everywhere recommend it.
    – AndyO
    Aug 4, 2018 at 17:35
  • Don't pay attention to "UTF8 everywhere" You can't use UTF8 with WinAPI functions. Aug 4, 2018 at 20:03
  • 1
    @BarmakShemirani: It's in the Wikipedia link I posted in a comment: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unicode_in_Microsoft_Windows#UTF-8 Aug 5, 2018 at 16:19

2 Answers 2

3

The mbstowcs function converts from a string encoded in the current locale's encoding to wchar_t[], not from UTF-8 (unless that encoding is UTF-8). On post-April-beta-2018 versions of Windows 10 or later, you actually can fix Windows to use UTF-8 as the encoding for plain char[] strings either as a global setting, or presumably by calling _setmbcp(65001). Older versions of Windows explicitly forbid this however for dubious historical reasons.

Anyway, you second version of the code which you called "Windows" should work on arbitrary systems if not for a bug in MSVC's wprintf that you worked around: they have the meanings of %ls and %s backwards for the wide stdio functions. In standard C, you need %ls to format a wchar_t[] string. But there's actually no reason to use wprintf there at all, and in fact wprintf is highly problematic because you can't mix it with byte-oriented stdio (doing so invokes undefined behavior). So better would be:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <locale.h>

int main() {
  setlocale(LC_ALL, "");
  wchar_t* str = L"Rölf";
  printf("%ls\n", str);
}

and this version should work correctly on Windows and standards-conforming C implementations, since for the byte-oriented printf functions, MSVC doesn't have the meaning of %s and %ls reversed.

If you really want to, you can also use a variant of your third version of the code, but you can't use mbstowcs to convert from UTF-8 to wchar_t. Instead you need to either:

  1. Assume wchar_t is Unicode-encoded, and convert from UTF-8 to Unicode codepoints with your own (or a third-party library's) UTF-8 decoder. But this is a bad assumption, because MSVC is also non-conforming in that it uses UTF-16 for wchar_t (C explicitly forbids "multi-wchar_t-characters because the mb/wc APIs are inherently incompatible with them), not Unicode codepoint values (equivalent to UTF-32).

  2. Convert from UTF-8 to uchar32_t (UTF-32) with your own (or a third-party library's) UTF-8 decoder, then use c32rtomb to convert to wchar_t[].

  3. Use iconv (standard on POSIX systems; available as a third-party library on Windows) to convert directly from UTF-8 to wchar_t.


UTF8 option for Windows 10, version 1803+

enter image description here

16
  • Any reference for Windows 10 finally allowing and working properly with UTF-8 as codepage? Any linitations there? Aug 4, 2018 at 17:44
  • 1
    Windows 10 supports UTF8 for console programs only. The WinAPI functions only support UTF16, or ANSI. MultiByteToWideChar will convert from UTF8 to UTF16 Aug 4, 2018 at 20:02
  • 1
    "dubious historical reasons" - There's nothing dubious about that change breaking IsDBCSLeadByte. And a number of other API calls as well as CRT functions. Microsoft has (had?) a history of providing an unprecedented compatibility story, for developers and users alike. No matter how attractive flipping that switch may be to some, with the amount of unknown repercussions it's just not something you'd do lightly. The risks involved kept pushing this feature towards the bottom of the priority list. Aug 5, 2018 at 22:50
  • 1
    As for making IsDBCSLeadByte UTF-8 aware, without breaking the contract: That simply won't work. Your proposed solution breaks software that counts codepoints, for example, by moving through a byte stream a character at a time, skipping the following character in case of a lead byte. Aug 5, 2018 at 23:49
  • 1
    @IInspectable: As for IsDBCSLeadByte, the contract of that function is insufficient for counting characters, and it simply shouldn't be used. That doesn't mean supporting UTF-8 is "breaking its contract". Rather it's just exposing that the contract is not useful for what applications wanted to do with it. Aug 6, 2018 at 0:09
2

Thanks to Barmak Shemirani making me aware of MultiByteToWideChar, I've found a solution to this that is even C99 conform. (Which works on Windows 7 by the way)

Note that setlocale() is only necessary for console output to render correctly. I didn't use it to highlight that it doesn't seem to be needed for GUI-related API calls.

#define UNICODE
#define _UNICODE

#include <stdio.h>
#include <windows.h>
//#include <locale.h>

wchar_t* toWide(char* str) {
  int wchars_num = MultiByteToWideChar(CP_UTF8, 0, str, -1, NULL, 0);

  wchar_t* wstr = (wchar_t*)malloc(sizeof(wchar_t) * wchars_num);
  MultiByteToWideChar(CP_UTF8, 0, str, -1, wstr, wchars_num);

  return wstr;
}

int main() {
  // For output in console to render correctly - as far as the font allows anyway...
  //setlocale(LC_ALL, "");

  // PLATFORM-AGNOSTIC DATA STRUCTURE WITH UTF-8 TEXT
  // (Usually not directly next to the platform-specific API calls...)
  char* str = "Rölf";

  // PLATFORM-SPECIFIC TEXT HANDLING
  wchar_t* wstr = toWide(str);
  printf("%ls\n", wstr);

  MessageBox(NULL, wstr, L"Rölf", MB_OK);
  free(wstr);
}

The way I use it is that I declare a data structure to be filled by my users where all text is char* and assumed to be UTF-8. Then in my library, I use platform-specific UI APIs. And in the case of Windows, doing the above UTF-16 conversion is obviously necessary.

12
  • If you want to follow the idiotic recommendations from utf8everywhere then go ahead. Experienced Windows programmers use UTF16 only. There is legitimate usage for UTF8, for example saving files in UTF8 is easier and more compatible, web pages need UTF8 standard... Aug 5, 2018 at 0:50
  • 1
    @BarmakShemirani: There's nothing idiotic about utf8everywhere. If you want the core of your software to be clean and cross-platform, not full of Windows-specific madness, it's the right thing to do. Aug 5, 2018 at 1:00
  • @R.. WinAPI is platform specific to begin with. Adding UTF8 compatibility to these incompatible WinAPI functions doesn't make any sense. You can advocate cross platform tools, or separate the UI from worker threads... Otherwise system APIs have to use native encoding. Aug 5, 2018 at 3:40
  • @BarmakShemirani It absolutely makes sense if you're writing a platform-agnostic UI library. Makes its use more convenient if users can supply the data in UTF-8 regardless of the platform (for both the user and me, since I don't have to have manage duplicate data structures). Why does the precise point in time at which the conversion to UTF-16 happens get you riled up so much anyway? You even argue to separate the UI yourself. That's exactly what this approach does?
    – AndyO
    Aug 5, 2018 at 9:19
  • 1
    @AndyO Sure, that's perfectly legitimate for cross platform code. Your aim wasn't clear to me. Aug 5, 2018 at 13:19

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