1

I have been struggling trying to develop my own singly linked list, I cant understand how a node is inserted at the end of a Linked List?

Here's the code:

class LinkedList
{
    private Node head;

    public void AddLast(int value)
    {
        if (head == null)
        {
            head = new Node();

            head.value = value;
            head.next = null;
        }
        else
        {
            Node temp = new Node();
            temp.value = value;

            Node current = head;

            while (current.next != null)
            {
                current = current.next;
            }

            current.next = temp;
        }
    }

    public void PrintAll() 
    {
        Node current = head;

        while (current != null)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(current.value);
            current = current.next;
        }

    }
}

Here is the main method

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        LinkedList list = new LinkedList();
        list.AddLast(3);
        list.AddLast(5);
        list.AddLast(4);
    }

1) I totally get the first part list.AddLast(3). Since head is null, we create a new node head and assign values to it.

2) When list.AddLast(5) is called, head is no more null, and thus we create a new temporary node, assign values to it. NOW we create a new node current which holds values of Head, it is to be noted Head.Next was null.

Now we iterate through current and place our temp node to current.Next.

3) Now, Upon calling list.AddLast(5) shouldn't the current be again overwritten with the contents of Head? which was Head.Value = 3 and Head.Next = Null.

So shouldn't it current.Value = 3 and Current.Next = Null? And if not then why?

  • Use BCL LinkedList<T> and you don't have to worry about it – TheGeneral Aug 6 '18 at 4:48
  • This works too but I don't get why, and I am learning to make my own. – Jameel Aslam Aug 6 '18 at 4:49
2
Node current = head;

When the above statement executes, current is assigned only the reference of head temporarily and not the value. So current only points to head at that moment. current.value will give you the value for head if executed after this statement.

while (current.next != null)
{
    current = current.next;
}

Now, when the above while loop executes, it iterates through the linked list and takes the current node to the last node in the linked list which will have current.next = null.

current.next = temp;

When the above statement executes, the new node is added to the last of the linked list.

  • So it points to that only? But will the changes in current effect in head? Aren't what you saying similar to this? int a = 2; int b = a; b = 4; Console.WriteLine(a); But the value of a here remains the same //2 – Jameel Aslam Aug 6 '18 at 5:40
  • You have given an example of value type variables but current i believe is a reference type variable. In case of value type the actual value is stored in the variable itself. In case of reference type variable, the variable doesn't contain the actual value but an address to a memory location where the actual value is present. So current = head does not set the actual value of current to value of head. Instead it changes the memory address stored in current to the memory address stored in head – Akshey Bhat Aug 6 '18 at 5:48
  • see this tutorialsteacher.com/csharp/… – Akshey Bhat Aug 6 '18 at 5:49
  • Thanks a lot, classes a reference types, structs are value types, totally forgot them. Thanks a looooooot. – Jameel Aslam Aug 6 '18 at 5:53
  • @JameelAslam You are welcome. Happy to help :) – Akshey Bhat Aug 6 '18 at 5:54
0

You create a new instance of LinkedList.

list.AddLast(3); --> head is null, you create a new Node and assign it to head.

list.AddLast(5); --> Create a new Node temp and assigns 5 to the value. Keep in mind that head's value = 3 and next is null. A new variable is created called current that points to head. The while then traverses the tree and if current's next is not null, then reassign current's next to that node. In this case, the while loop is not run because head's next is null, so all it does is just assign head.next to your current node. At this point we have head.value = 3, head.next = new Node(5, null);

list.AddLast(4); --> Same as above but the while loop now runs. It traverses all the way to find a Node that has no next value and assigns 4 to it. At this point we have head.value = 3, head.next = new Node(5, new Node(4, null))

0

There are oodles of implementations of linked lists. However for a simple singlely Linked list we think of it like thus

enter image description here

If i understand you correctly, this is the part you don't understand

// All this part of the method does is add the new value to the end of the list

// create node
Node temp = new Node();
// assign its value
temp.value = value;

// now we want to start with the head and follow 
// the chain until we find the last node
Node current = head;
// has it got a next element
while (current.next != null)
{
    // if so change current to next and look again
    current = current.next;
}

// yay no more nexts, lets add temp here
current.next = temp;

// you have effectively added your new element to the end of the list

On saying that another common implementation is to save the Last/Current Node in the class (just like you did with head).

In that case, instead of iterating through the chain we can reference that Node and just add to its next and update Last reference in the class. However when we have to remove the last item, we have to remember not only to null Last in the class but null its parents Next reference as well.

The only way to do this is once again iterate the chain.

To make that easier we can implement a doubly linked list so its easier to find its parent

enter image description here

Update

what I don't understand is that why isn't the link to next nodes lost when current who holds that info is updated every time with content of Head.

In the above, think of current as just a temporary variable, its sole job in life is just like a temporary marker of the next link in the chain,

When we call this

current = current.next;

All its doing its grabbing whats in current.next and holding on to it for the loop condition again. We can call this without destroying whats in current.next

On the last time, when we have found nothing in current.next i.e when the loop checks that current.next== null we can safely put our temp node into it current.next = temp; <== it was empty anyway

  • Thanks a lot TheGeneral for the explanation, what I don't understand is that why isn't the link to next nodes lost when current who holds that info is updated every time with content of Head. – Jameel Aslam Aug 6 '18 at 5:21
  • @JameelAslam updated, i hope this makes is clearer – TheGeneral Aug 6 '18 at 5:26

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